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Patient-Centered E-Health

Book Description

Patient-Centered E-Health presents the perspective of a distinct form of e-health that is patient-focused, patient-aware, and patient-active. This must-have book for researchers, educators, and healthcare practitioners addresses the characteristics of the e-health domain through a user-centered design, providing foundational topics in areas such as patient-centered design methods and e-health marketing.

Table of Contents

  1. Copyright
  2. List of Reviewers
  3. Foreword
  4. Preface
      1. Trends That Drive Patient-Centered E-Health
      2. Patient-Focused E-Health
      3. Patient-Active E-Health
      4. Patient-Empowered E-Health
      5. How PCEH Contributes to Research and Practice
      6. Organization of the Book
    1. REFERENCES
  5. Acknowledgment
  6. I. Foundations
    1. I. Towards Patient-Centered Care: The Role of E-Health in Enabling Patient Access to Health Information
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. BACKGROUND
        1. Healthcare Delivery Systems and Health IS
        2. The Patient-Centered Care Initiative
      4. E-HEALTH
        1. Requirements for Patient-Centered E-Health
          1. Infrastructure
          2. Privacy and Security
          3. Usability
          4. Business Goals and Operations
          5. Collaboration
          6. Access
      5. FUTURE TRENDS AND RESEARCH DIRECTIONS
      6. CONCLUSION
      7. REFERENCES
    2. II. Patient-Centered E-Health Design
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. APPLYING UCD TO DESIGN OF PATIENT-CENTERED E-HEALTH
        1. Inquiring Research Methods: Understanding What Users Want
          1. Contextual Inquiry
          2. Ethnographic Study / Field Observation
          3. Focus Groups
          4. Questionnaire Surveys
          5. Other Inquiring Methods
        2. Inspection Design Methods: What the Analyst Can See
          1. Heuristic Evaluation
          2. Cognitive Walkthrough
          3. Other Inspection Methods
          4. Usability Testing Methods
          5. Think-Aloud Protocol
          6. Question-Asking Protocol
        3. Prototyping Methods
          1. Paper Prototypes
        4. Case Study: Paper Prototyping in Developing a Personal Health Record (PHR)
          1. The Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires Experience
      4. CONCLUSION
      5. REFERENCES
    3. III. Connecting with Ourselves and Others Online: Psychological Aspects of Online Health Communication
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. THEORIES OF COMPUTER MEDIATED COMMUNICATION
      4. SELF-DISCLOSURE
        1. Health-Related Self-Disclosure
        2. Writing and Health
      5. SELF-PERCEPTION: HOW WE VIEW OURSELVES
      6. SELF-REGULATION THROUGH TEXT: REHEARSING AND REPROCESSING
      7. HEALTH-RELATED SELF-PRESENTATION: TURNING TEXT INTO A SOCIAL ACT
        1. Self-Presentation
        2. Strategic Self-Presentation
      8. LOWERING THRESHOLDS FOR HELP-SEEKING
      9. GROUP PROCESSES: IMPLICATIONS FOR SELF-HELP
      10. IMPLICATIONS FOR HEALTH-SERVICES
        1. Patient-Centeredness Face-to-Face
        2. CMC in Facilitating Patient-Centeredness
      11. CHALLENGES AND FUTURE RESEARCH
      12. CONCLUDING REMARKS
      13. REFERENCES
      14. ENDNOTES
    4. IV. Personal Health Records: Patients in Control
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. BACKGROUND
        1. Privacy and Security
        2. Electronic Medical Records and Electronic Health Records
        3. Personal Health Information Management
        4. Approaches to the PHR
      4. DATA QUALITY CONCERNS
      5. SOCIAL CONCERNS
      6. CONCLUSION
      7. REFERENCES
    5. V. Disability Determinations and Personal Health Records
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
          1. Chapter Overview
      3. PROBLEM: APPLYING FOR SSA DISABILITY BENEFITS
        1. Controversy: A Provider-Centered National Health Information Network
          1. Health Information Technology Policy Recommendations
          2. Building a National Health Information Network
        2. Recommendation: Room at the NHIN for Consumers with Disabilities
      4. FUTURE TRENDS
      5. CONCLUSION
      6. REFERENCES
    6. VI. E-Health Marketing
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. WHAT IS E-HEALTH MARKETING?
      4. WHO WILL USE PCEH?
      5. THE PCEH MARKETING MIX
        1. Product
        2. Place
        3. Price
        4. Promotion
        5. Personalization
          1. Levels of Personalization
          2. Information Prescriptions
        6. Participation
          1. E-Mail
          2. Blogs
          3. Wikis
          4. Virtual Environments and Simulation
        7. Peer-to-Peer
          1. Discussion Forums
          2. Social Networking Sites
          3. Viral Marketing
          4. Patients' Ratings of Their Healthcare Providers
        8. Predictive Modeling
      6. SUMMARY
      7. REFERENCES
    7. VII. Privacy Management of Patient-Centered E-Health
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. BACKGROUND
        1. Perspectives on Privacy
        2. Value of Privacy
      4. PRIVACY FRAMEWORK
        1. Privacy Theories
        2. Privacy Principles
        3. Model of Privacy Management
        4. Example of Privacy Management Model
      5. FUTURE TRENDS
      6. CONCLUSION
      7. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
      8. REFERENCES
      9. ENDNOTES
    8. VIII. Trust in Patient-Centered E-Health
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. TRUST
      4. DISPOSITION TO TRUST
        1. Trusting Beliefs
        2. Cognitive Processes
        3. Institution-Based Trust
      5. PATIENT-CENTERED E-HEALTH INITIATIVES
          1. Medical Content Aggregators
          2. Trust in Aggregation Vendors
          3. Trust in Content Authors
          4. Online Communities
          5. Trust in Community Vendor
          6. Trust in Group Members
          7. Patient-Physician Portals
          8. Trust in Portal Vendors
          9. Trust in Healthcare Provider
      6. FUTURE TRENDS
      7. CONCLUSION
      8. REFERENCES
    9. IX. Involving Patients and the Public in E-Health Research
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. BACKGROUND
      4. HOW TO INVOLVE CONSUMERS IN E-HEALTH RESEARCH
      5. WHEN TO INVOLVE CONSUMERS IN E-HEALTH RESEARCH
      6. PRINCIPLES TO GUIDE CONSUMER INVOLVEMENT
      7. CONSUMER INVOLVEMENT IN THE DESIGN AND EVALUATION OF AN INTERNET-BASED TOOL FOR DIABETES SELF-MANAGEMENT
      8. CONCLUSION
      9. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
      10. REFERENCES
  7. II. Applications
    1. X. Using Interaction Design to Improve Usability of a PHR User Interface Based on Visual Elements
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
        1. Interaction Design
        2. Visual Design
        3. A PHR user Interface Based On Visual Elements
      3. INTERACTION DESIGN APPROACH TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF A VISUAL-BASED PHR: A CASE STUDY
        1. Methods
        2. Study Design
        3. Statistical Analysis
      4. RESULTS
        1. Participants' Background
        2. User Performance
        3. Analysis of the Process Data
        4. Design Recommendations
        5. User Satisfaction
      5. CONCLUSION
      6. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
      7. REFERENCES
    2. XI. Healthcare Quality and Cost Transparency Using Web-Based Tools
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. BACKGROUND
      4. TRENDS, ISSUES, AND CONTROVERSIES
        1. Quality and Cost in the Healthcare Decision Process
        2. Consumer Empowerment
        3. Web-Based Quality and Cost Tool Compatibility
      5. PATIENT COMPATILITY: CONSIDERATIONS TO ENHANCE EASE-OF-USE AND VALUE
        1. User-Centered Design Methods
        2. Preferred Task Style
        3. Compatibility With Existing Task Practices
        4. Compatibility With Prior Experience
        5. Compatibility With Values
      6. CONCLUSION
      7. REFERENCES
    3. A. FOCUS GROUP PROTOCOL OUTLINE
    4. XII. Perceptions of E-Health in Rural Communities
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. RELEVANT CHARACTERISTICS OF RURAL RESIDENTS
        1. Health Risk Assessments
        2. Feedback from Nonparticipants
      4. IMPORTANT DIMENSIONS IN RURAL RESIDENTS' PERCEPTIONS OF E-HEALTH
        1. Prior Experience with e-Health Web Sites
        2. E-Health Value
        3. Understanding the Unique Needs of Rural Residents
        4. Communicating E-Health Web Site Purpose and Services
        5. E-Health and Healthcare Advertising Do Not Mix
        6. Web Site Content and Language is Important
        7. Reputation of Sponsoring Organization is Important
        8. Security and Privacy Issues
        9. E-Health Web Site Trustworthiness and Confidentiality
        10. Usability of the E-Health User Interface
        11. Technological Infrastructure Issues and Constraints
        12. Appreciation of Interest in Rural Communities
        13. Summary
      5. DISCUSSION
        1. Limitations
      6. CONCLUSION
      7. REFERENCES
    5. XIII. Assessing a Patient-Centered E-Health Approach to Chronic Disease Self-Management
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. BACKGROUND
      3. INTRODUCTION
      4. PART ONE: CONSIDERATIONS FOR A PATIENT-CENTRED APPROACH
      5. PART TWO: IMPLICATIONS OF THE ISSUES EXAMINED
        1. Background to the Case Study
        2. The ICT Tool
        3. Methodology
      6. RESULTS
          1. The Evidence-Based Approach to Chronic Illness
          2. The Doctor-Patient Relationship
          3. Collaboration and Communication with E-Health
      7. CONCLUSION
      8. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
      9. REFERENCES
    6. XIV. Incompatible Images: Asthmatics' Non-Use of an E-Health System for Asthma Self-Management
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. BACKGROUND
      4. CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK
      5. METHOD
      6. AWEB'S TRANSLATION OF ASTHMA
      7. ASTHMATICS' PERFORMANCE OF ASTHMA
        1. Four Asthma Realities
        2. Good and Bad Passages
        3. An Economy of Passages
      8. DISCUSSION
        1. A Turn to the User
        2. Implications for E-Health Design
      9. CONCLUSION
      10. REFERENCES
    7. XV. Exploring the Technology Adoption Needs of Patients Using E-Health
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. PRIOR RESEARCH
        1. Usefulness
        2. Ease of Use
        3. Trust
        4. Privacy
        5. Personalization
      4. METHOD
        1. Participants
        2. Data Collection
        3. Data Analysis Procedures
        4. Traditional Analysis of Think-Aloud Data
        5. Analysis of Adaptive Usability and Knowledge Centered Data
      5. DATA ANALYSIS
      6. RESULTS
        1. Usefulness
        2. Ease of Use
        3. Trust
        4. Privacy
        5. Personalization
      7. DISCUSSION
      8. CONCLUSION
      9. REFERENCES
    8. B.
    9. C.
    10. D.
    11. E.
    12. F.
    13. G.
    14. XVI. Predicting Patients' Use of Provider-Delivered E-Health: The Role of Facilitating Conditions
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. BACKGROUND
      4. RESEARCH MODEL AND HYPOTHESES
        1. BI Toward Use
        2. Prior Use of Offline Services
        3. Structural Need
        4. Model Predictiveness
      5. RESEARCH METHOD
        1. Procedure
      6. RESULTS
        1. Construct Validation
        2. Hypothesis Tests
      7. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION
      8. FUTURE RESEARCH DIRECTIONS
      9. CONCLUSION
      10. REFERENCES
      11. ENDNOTE
  8. Compilation of References
  9. About the Contributors