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Overcoming the Five Dysfunctions of a Team: A Field Guide for Leaders, Managers, and Facilitators

Book Description

In the years following the publication of Patrick Lencioni's best-seller The Five Dysfunctions of a Team, fans have been clamoring for more information on how to implement the ideas outlined in the book. In Overcoming the Five Dysfunctions of a Team, Lencioni offers more specific, practical guidance for overcoming the Five Dysfunctions-using tools, exercises, assessments, and real-world examples. He examines questions that all teams must ask themselves: Are we really a team? How are we currently performing? Are we prepared to invest the time and energy required to be a great team? Written concisely and to the point, this guide gives leaders, line managers, and consultants alike the tools they need to get their teams up and running quickly and effectively.

Table of Contents

  1. Copyright
  2. WHY A FIELD GUIDE?
  3. I. Getting Clear on the Concept
    1. 1. THE CASE FOR TEAMWORK
      1. 1.1. A QUICK OVERVIEW OF THE MODEL
    2. 2. TWO IMPORTANT QUESTIONS
      1. 2.1. Question #1: Are we really a team?
        1. 2.1.1. Question #1: Are we really a team?
        2. 2.1.2. Question #2: Are we ready for heavy lifting?
  4. II. Overcoming the Five Dysfunctions of a Team
    1. 3. OVERCOMING DYSFUNCTION #1
      1. 3.1. BUILDING TRUST
        1. 3.1.1. Defining Trust
        2. 3.1.2. The Difficulty of Vulnerability-Based Trust
      2. 3.2. TOOLS AND EXERCISES
        1. 3.2.1. The Personal Histories Exercise
        2. 3.2.2. Behavioral Profiling
          1. 3.2.2.1. Advice on Administering the MBTI
          2. 3.2.2.2. Maintaining Momentum
    2. 4. OVERCOMING DYSFUNCTION #2
      1. 4.1. MASTERING CONFLICT
        1. 4.1.1. The Inevitability of Discomfort
        2. 4.1.2. The Fear of Personal Conflict
      2. 4.2. TOOLS AND EXERCISES
        1. 4.2.1. Conflict Profiling
        2. 4.2.2. Conflict Norming
        3. 4.2.3. Mining for Conflict
        4. 4.2.4. Real-Time Permission
        5. 4.2.5. Meetings and Conflict
        6. 4.2.6. Conflict Resolution Obstacles
    3. 5. OVERCOMING DYSFUNCTION #3
      1. 5.1. ACHIEVING COMMITMENT
        1. 5.1.1. Buy-In
        2. 5.1.2. Clarity
      2. 5.2. TOOLS AND EXERCISES
        1. 5.2.1. Commitment Clarification
        2. 5.2.2. Cascading Communication
        3. 5.2.3. Committing to Key Principles
        4. 5.2.4. Thematic Goals
    4. 6. OVERCOMING DYSFUNCTION #4
      1. 6.1. EMBRACING ACCOUNTABILITY
      2. 6.2. TOOLS AND EXERCISES
        1. 6.2.1. Team Effectiveness Exercise
        2. 6.2.2. Meetings and Accountability
    5. 7. OVERCOMING DYSFUNCTION #5
      1. 7.1. FOCUSING ON RESULTS
        1. 7.1.1. Distractions
          1. 7.1.1.1. Distraction #1: Ego
          2. 7.1.1.2. Distractions #2 and #3: Career Development and Money
          3. 7.1.1.3. Distraction #4: My Department
        2. 7.1.2. The Team #1 Dilemma
      2. 7.2. TOOLS AND EXERCISES
        1. 7.2.1. Scoreboard
  5. III. Answering Questions and Anticipating Problems
    1. 8. COMMON QUESTIONS
      1. 8.1. How long does it take to build a team?
        1. 8.1.1. How long does it take to build a team?
      2. 8.2. How many people should be on a team?
      3. 8.3. How likely is it that you'll have to lose (remove) a member of the team in order to make progress?
      4. 8.4. How much can be accomplished during a two-day off-site session?
      5. 8.5. If I'm a manager of the team, should I use an outside consultant or facilitator?
    2. 9. OBJECTIONS FROM PARTICIPANTS
      1. 9.1. "We can't take two whole days out of the office!"
        1. 9.1.1. "We can't take two whole days out of the office!"
      2. 9.2. "But we have real work to do!"
        1. 9.2.1.
          1. 9.2.1.1. Adrenaline Addiction
      3. 9.3. "These touchy-feely sessions are nonsense!"
      4. 9.4. "This is just another flavor of the month. Next quarter we'll be on to something new."
    3. 10. OBSTACLES TO AVOID
      1. 10.1. The leader isn't truly committed to building a team.
        1. 10.1.1. The leader isn't truly committed to building a team.
      2. 10.2. Team members are holding back.
      3. 10.3. Someone is dominating the session.
      4. 10.4. Team members are geographically dispersed and don't spend much time together.
      5. 10.5. A top performer isn't interested in or committed to the team-building process.
      6. 10.6. A team member reports to two different teams.
  6. IV. Building the Team
    1. 11. TEAM-BUILDING ROAD MAP
      1. 11.1. TIME LINE
    2. 12. THE INITIAL OFF-SITE
      1. 12.1. Overview and Assessment (one or two hours)
        1. 12.1.1. Overview and Assessment (one or two hours)
          1. 12.1.1.1. Overview of the Five Dysfunctions (around half an hour)
          2. 12.1.1.2. Review of Team Assessment Report Results (about one hour)
      2. 12.2. Building Trust (two to four hours)
        1. 12.2.1.
          1. 12.2.1.1. Personal Histories Exercise (around fifteen minutes)
          2. 12.2.1.2. Behavioral Profile Exercise (around two to four hours)
          3. 12.2.1.3. Trust Review
      3. 12.3. Mastering Conflict (one or two hours)
        1. 12.3.1.
          1. 12.3.1.1. Conflict Profiling (around thirty to sixty minutes)
          2. 12.3.1.2. Conflict Norming (around thirty minutes)
          3. 12.3.1.3. Conflict Resolution Obstacles (around thirty to sixty minutes)
      4. 12.4. Achieving Commitment (two to six hours)
        1. 12.4.1.
          1. 12.4.1.1. Clarification of Team and Organizational Principles
      5. 12.5. Embracing Accountability (one or two hours)
        1. 12.5.1.
          1. 12.5.1.1. Team Effectiveness Exercise
      6. 12.6. Focusing on Results (one hour)
        1. 12.6.1.
          1. 12.6.1.1. Establishment of a Team Scoreboard
      7. 12.7. Off-Site Wrap-Up and Follow-Up
        1. 12.7.1.
          1. 12.7.1.1. Commitment Clarification
          2. 12.7.1.2. Cascading Communication
          3. 12.7.1.3. Initial Off-Site Follow-Up
    3. 13. TOOLS AND EXERCISES IN DETAIL
      1. 13.1. PRELIMINARY WORK
        1. 13.1.1. Review of the Online Team Assessment
      2. 13.2. PRELIMINARY WORK
        1. 13.2.1. Review of the Short-Form Team Assessment
      3. 13.3. TEAM ASSESSMENT
      4. 13.4. INDIVIDUAL SCORING
      5. 13.5. BUILDING TRUST
        1. 13.5.1. Personal Histories Exercise
      6. 13.6. BUILDING TRUST
        1. 13.6.1. Behavioral Profiling
      7. 13.7. MASTERING CONFLICT
        1. 13.7.1. Conflict Profiling
      8. 13.8. MASTERING CONFLICT
        1. 13.8.1. Conflict Norming
      9. 13.9. MASTERING CONFLICT
        1. 13.9.1. Conflict Resolution Model
      10. 13.10. MASTERING CONFLICT
        1. 13.10.1. Conflict Resolution Exercise
      11. 13.11. MASTERING CONFLICT
        1. 13.11.1. Depth-Frequency Conflict Model
      12. 13.12. MASTERING CONFLICT
        1. 13.12.1. Thomas-Kilmann Model
      13. 13.13. ACHIEVING COMMITMENT
        1. 13.13.1. Commitment Clarification
      14. 13.14. ACHIEVING COMMITMENT
        1. 13.14.1. Cascading Communication
      15. 13.15. ACHIEVING COMMITMENT
        1. 13.15.1. Clarification of Team Principles
      16. 13.16. ACHIEVING COMMITMENT
        1. 13.16.1. Clarification of Organizational Principles
      17. 13.17. ACHIEVING COMMITMENT
        1. 13.17.1. Establishment of Thematic Goal
          1. 13.17.1.1. The Challenge of Deprioritization
          2. 13.17.1.2. The Specialist's Dilemma
          3. 13.17.1.3. Determining the Length of the Period
      18. 13.18. EMBRACING ACCOUNTABILITY
        1. 13.18.1. Team Effectiveness Exercise
      19. 13.19. FOCUSING ON RESULTS
        1. 13.19.1. Establishment of Team Scoreboard
      20. 13.20. FOLLOW-UP
        1. 13.20.1. Initial Off-Site Follow-Up
  7. GLOSSARY OF TERMS
  8. RESOURCES
    1. 13.21. MBTI®
      1. 13.21.1. Thomas-Kilmann Conflict Mode Instrument
      2. 13.21.2. Social Style Model™
    2. 13.22. DiSC®
      1. 13.22.1. Insights
      2. 13.22.2. RightPath Profiles®
      3. 13.22.3. TRI—Temperament Research Institute
  9. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
  10. About the Author