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Open Text Metastorm ProVision® 6.2 Strategy Implementation

Book Description

Create and implement a successful business strategy for improved performance throughout the whole enterprise

  • Fully understand the key benefits of implementing a business strategy

  • Utilize features like the integrated repository and ProVision® frameworks

  • Obtain real insights from practitioners in the field on the best strategic approaches

  • Ultimately design a successful strategy for deploying ProVision®

  • In Detail

    Open Text ProVision® (formerly known as Metastorm ProVision®) is an Enterprise Architecture (EA) solution allowing for effective planning and decision making throughout the enterprise. It enables an organization to have a central repository of information about the business, reducing organizational risks and better optimizing business resources.

    Implemented well, it enables better and more actionable decisions exactly when you need them.

    This book combines theory and practice to provide a step- by- step guide to building a successful customer- centric model of your business. The approach is simple and down to earth, and along the way, with various real-world examples, you will learn how to make a business case, use a framework, and adopt a methodology with Open Text ProVision®.

    This book draws on the experience of ProVision® experts around the world. By combining theory with practice from the field you can avoid common mistakes and develop a successful customer centric strategy for implementing ProVision®. Each chapter builds on the previous one to give you the confidence to implement a central repository, dealing with both the technical and human issues that you might face.

    Learn from real world business cases to think beyond the technical aspects of strategy implementation and enable better business decisions with Open Text ProVision®.

    Table of Contents

    1. Open Text Metastorm ProVision® 6.2 Strategy Implementation
      1. Open Text Metastorm ProVision® 6.2 Strategy Implementation
      2. Credits
      3. Foreword
      4. About the Author
      5. About the Reviewers
      6. www.PacktPub.com
        1. Support files, eBooks, discount offers and more
          1. Why Subscribe?
          2. Free Access for Packt account holders
          3. Instant Updates on New Packt Books
      7. Preface
        1. About this book
        2. What this book covers
        3. Conclusion
        4. What you need for this book
        5. Who this book is for
        6. Conventions
        7. Reader feedback
        8. Customer support
          1. Errata
          2. Piracy
          3. Questions
      8. 1. Designing a Strategy
        1. Why choose ProVision®
          1. Personal context
          2. Time
          3. Responsibility
          4. Scope
            1. Project scope
            2. Enterprise scope
          5. Business context
            1. Recommendation
        2. Strategy
          1. The business case
          2. The framework and methodology
          3. The toolset
          4. Governance
        3. Implementation
          1. Lists
          2. Building your lists
          3. Who is responsible for initially gathering the information
          4. How do you name objects
          5. Who ensures that the object is maintained
          6. Where is the object stored
          7. What is the publishing process for models
          8. How much detail does the object require
          9. How do you move the information from another system to ProVision®
        4. Project management methodology
          1. Build sequence
            1. Customers
            2. Products and services
            3. Critical processes
            4. Critical elements
              1. Actors
              2. Business rules
              3. Computer systems
              4. Data
              5. Events
              6. Facilities
              7. Gear (equipment)
            5. Goals
        5. Next phase
        6. Leverage
          1. Sample development program
        7. Summary
      9. 2. Making a Business Case
        1. The benefits of moving to a central repository
          1. Designed to scale
            1. Object
            2. Link
            3. Model
            4. Notebook and file
            5. Repository
          2. Store once, reuse many times
          3. Working collaboratively
          4. Architecture or design
            1. TOGAF9
            2. Federal Enterprise Architecture
              1. Evidence
          5. Open Text Metastorm's unique strengths
            1. Open Text Metastorm BPM
            2. The competitive advantage
          6. Better decisions now
          7. Case study: Sandra's story
        2. Summary
      10. 3. Using a Framework
        1. What is a business framework
          1. How frameworks can confuse
          2. Making sense of frameworks
        2. Enterprise Designer framework
          1. How to read this section
          2. Seven elements A—G
            1. Actor
              1. Naming convention
              2. Permitted objects
              3. Permitted models
              4. Relationships
              5. Comments
            2. Business rules
              1. Naming convention
              2. Permitted objects
              3. Permitted models
              4. Relationships
              5. Comments
            3. Computer system
              1. Naming convention
              2. Permitted objects
              3. Permitted models
              4. Relationships
              5. Comments
            4. Data
              1. Naming convention
              2. Permitted objects
              3. Permitted models
              4. Relationships
              5. Comments
            5. Event
              1. Naming convention
              2. Permitted objects
              3. Permitted models
              4. Relationships
              5. Comments
            6. Facility
              1. Naming convention
              2. Permitted objects
              3. Permitted models
              4. Relationships
              5. Comments
            7. Gear
              1. Naming convention
              2. Permitted objects
              3. Permitted models
              4. Relationships
              5. Comments
          3. Ten processes H—Q
            1. Process
              1. Naming convention
              2. Permitted objects
              3. Permitted models
              4. Relationships
              5. Comments
          4. Receivables and services
            1. R—Receivable
              1. Naming convention
              2. Permitted objects
              3. Permitted models
              4. Relationships
              5. Comments
            2. S—Service or product
              1. Naming convention
              2. Permitted objects
              3. Permitted models
              4. Relationships
              5. Comments
          5. Customers and clients
            1. Markets
            2. Organizations
              1. Naming convention
              2. Permitted objects
              3. Permitted models
              4. Relationships
              5. Comments
          6. Five goals V—Z
            1. Goals
              1. Naming convention
              2. Permitted objects
              3. Permitted models
              4. Relationships
              5. Comments
        3. Comparing level 1 and level 2 frameworks
          1. ArchiMate framework
          2. ArchiMate and Enterprise Designer objects comparison
            1. Business actor
              1. Enterprise Designer
            2. Business role
              1. Enterprise Designer
            3. Business collaboration
              1. Enterprise Designer
            4. Business interface
              1. Enterprise Designer
            5. Business object
              1. Enterprise Designer
            6. Business Process
              1. Enterprise Designer
            7. Business function
              1. Enterprise Designer
            8. Business interaction
              1. Enterprise Designer
            9. Business event
              1. Enterprise Designer
            10. Business service
              1. Enterprise Designer
            11. Representation
              1. Enterprise Designer
            12. Meaning
              1. Enterprise Designer
            13. Value
              1. Enterprise Designer
            14. Product
              1. Enterprise Designer
            15. Contract
              1. Enterprise Designer
          3. What Enterprise Designer has that ArchiMate doesn't
          4. What ArchiMate has that Enterprise Designer doesn't
          5. Conclusion
        4. Comparing level 1 and level 3 frameworks
          1. eTOM (enhanced Telecom Operations Map)
            1. Is it a service or a process?
            2. Consistent framework
            3. Deliverable models
        5. Summary
      11. 4. Adopting a Methodology
        1. What is a methodology
        2. Project #1—building the high-level model
          1. Preparation
          2. Customer model
          3. Steps
          4. Tips
          5. Product and Service model
            1. Steps
            2. Tips
          6. Critical Customer Product model
            1. Steps
            2. Tips
        3. Project #2—building workflow models
          1. Critical Process model
            1. Steps
            2. Tips
          2. Workflow model
            1. Steps
            2. Tips
            3. Steps
            4. Tips
        4. Project #3—building System Interaction models
        5. Project #4—building Business Class models
        6. Project #5—building Organization models
          1. Other critical elements
            1. Business Rule models
            2. Steps
            3. Tips
            4. Event models
        7. Case study—the consultant's view
        8. Summary
      12. 5. Implementing Effective Governance
        1. What is governance
        2. Who needs to be involved
          1. Motorola change process
        3. Agile Management
          1. Governance and leadership
          2. Measurement
          3. Do the minimum
          4. The client is part of the team
          5. Have daily stand-up meetings
          6. Keep it simple
          7. Trust the team
          8. Work in pairs
        4. Modeling a governance structure with ProVision®
          1. Policies and procedures
            1. No need for everything
            2. Linking to other sources
            3. Visualize information
          2. Processes
        5. What if there is no governance
          1. Four steps
            1. Six step process
              1. Agenda
              2. Position
              3. Fact find/feel find
              4. Present
              5. Pause
              6. Open
        6. Summary
      13. 6. Understanding the Toolset
        1. ProVision® features and functionality
          1. Sharing models without Knowledge Exchange®
          2. Visio or ProVision
          3. Everything is an object
          4. Model and grid
          5. Model and interpret
          6. Model and simulate
          7. Model and execute
        2. Modeling, not configuration management
        3. Summary
      14. 7. Obtaining Buy-in
        1. Top 10 tips for process modeling
          1. #1 Identify and engage the process owner
          2. #2 Talk to the people who deal with errors
          3. #3 Capture the current "What" in detail but not the "How"
          4. #4 Reduce moments of truth
          5. #5 Reduce handoffs
          6. #6 Eliminate non-essential checking
          7. #7 Focus on high-volume processes
          8. #8 Implement the right process for right now
          9. #9 Use the 10 Enterprise Designer processes
          10. #10 Don't automate a broken process
          11. #11 Bonus tip—model backwards
        2. Using Appreciative Inquiry to engage staff
          1. Conversation about Appreciative Inquiry
        3. Distinguishing between change and transformation
        4. Understanding the outside-in (customer-centric) approach
          1. B2Me
        5. Summary
      15. A. References