O'Reilly logo

Office 2007 Bible by Lisa A. Bucki, Gavin Powell, Michael R. Irwin, Peter G. Aitken, Michael R. Groh, Cary N. Prague, Faithe Wempen, Herb Tyson, John Walkenbach

Stay ahead with the world's most comprehensive technology and business learning platform.

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required

Working with Chart Data

After you create a chart, you might want to change the data range on which it is based, or how this data is plotted. The following sections explain how you can do this.

Plotting by rows versus by columns

By default, the columns of the datasheet form the data series. However, if you want, you can switch the data around so that the rows form the series. Figures 23-31 and 23-32 show the same chart plotted both ways so that you can see the difference.

Figure 23-31. A chart with the columns representing the series.

Figure 23-32. A chart with the rows representing the series.

Note

What does the term data series mean? Take a look at Figures 23-31 and 23-32. Notice that there is a legend next to each chart that shows what each color (or shade of gray) represents. Each of these colors, and the label associated with it, is a series. The other variable (the one that is not the series) is plotted on the chart’s horizontal axis.

To switch back and forth between plotting by rows and by columns, click the Switch Row/Column button on the Chart Tools Design tab.

Tip

A chart can carry a very different message when you arrange it by rows versus by columns. For example, in Figure 23-31, the chart compares the quarters. The message here is about improvement—or lack thereof—over ...

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, interactive tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required