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Office 2007 Bible by Lisa A. Bucki, Gavin Powell, Michael R. Irwin, Peter G. Aitken, Michael R. Groh, Cary N. Prague, Faithe Wempen, Herb Tyson, John Walkenbach

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Understanding Cells and Ranges

A cell is a single element in a worksheet that can hold a value, some text, or a formula. A cell is identified by its address or reference, which consists of its column letter and row number. For example, cell D12 is the cell in the fourth column and the twelfth row.

A group of cells is called a range. You designate a range address by specifying its upper-left cell address and its lower-right cell address, separated by a colon.

Here are some examples of range addresses:

C24A range that consists of a single cell.
A1:B1Two cells that occupy one row and two columns.
A1:A100100 cells in column A.
A1:D416 cells (four rows by four columns).
C1:C1048576An entire column of cells; this range also can be expressed as C:C.
A6:XFD6An entire row of cells; this range also can be expressed as 6:6.
A1:XFD1048576All cells in a worksheet.

Selecting ranges

To perform an operation on a range of cells in a worksheet, you must first select the range. For example, if you want to make the text bold for a range of cells, you must select the range and then choose Home Font Bold (or press Ctrl+B).

When you select a range, the cells appear highlighted. The exception is the active cell, which remains its normal color. Figure 14-12 shows an example of a selected range (B5:C11) in a worksheet. ...

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