O'Reilly logo

Office 2007 Bible by Lisa A. Bucki, Gavin Powell, Michael R. Irwin, Peter G. Aitken, Michael R. Groh, Cary N. Prague, Faithe Wempen, Herb Tyson, John Walkenbach

Stay ahead with the world's most comprehensive technology and business learning platform.

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required

Controlling the Worksheet View

As you add more information to a worksheet, you may find that navigating and locating what you want gets more difficult. Excel includes a few options that enable you to view your sheet, and sometimes multiple sheets, more efficiently. This section discusses a few additional worksheet options at your disposal.

Zooming in or out for a better view

Normally, everything you see on-screen is displayed at 100 percent. You can change the zoom percentage from 10 percent (very tiny) to 400 percent (huge). Using a small zoom percentage can help you to get a bird’s-eye view of your worksheet to see how it’s laid out. Zooming in is useful if your eyesight isn’t quite what it used to be and you have trouble deciphering tiny type. Zooming doesn’t change the font size, so it has no affect on printed output.

Cross-Ref

Excel contains separate options for changing the size of your printed output. (Use the controls in the Page Layout Scale To Fit group on the Ribbon.)

Figure 14-5 shows a window zoomed to 10 percent and a window zoomed to 400 percent.

Figure 14-5. You can zoom in or out for a better view of your worksheets.

You can easily change the zoom factor of the active worksheet by using the Zoom slider located on the right end of the status ...

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, interactive tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required