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Nikon D3200 Digital Field Guide by Alan Hess

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Concert Photography

Concert photography is really tough and incredibly rewarding. Most concerts take place in dark halls or bars with fast-moving action and constantly changing lights. This makes it very difficult for the camera’s built-in meter to get an accurate reading of the light. Combining this with the limited amount of time available to shoot (usually only during the first three songs) and a limited area to shoot from makes concert photography extremely challenging.

Many midsized and larger venues do not allow cameras and frown on concert photography. If this is a type of photography you are interested in, start small and work your way up. Start with local bands in your area and grow a portfolio, then you can start to contact bigger venues and bigger bands. One method to gain access is to contact the venue directly and see if it needs a photographer for any shows. Another is to directly contact the band or the band’s publicist and offer to shoot the show for them. A third method is to shoot at events that allow photography, such as local festivals or street fairs. Building a portfolio allows you to show management at venues and bands what you can do. Approach every band and concert as if you are shooting for a music magazine, even if it is just some friends at a local club.

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8.7 Photographing at a club in Los Angeles allowed me to get really close to the stage. While ...

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