Cover by Gary A. Donahue

Safari, the world’s most comprehensive technology and business learning platform.

Find the exact information you need to solve a problem on the fly, or go deeper to master the technologies and skills you need to succeed

Start Free Trial

No credit card required

O'Reilly logo

Chapter 40. GAD’s Maxims

Over the years I’ve been in the industry, it has become apparent to me that there are certain driving forces in the IT universe. These forces are evident in just about all aspects of life, but their application is never more evident than it is in IT.

In every situation where an engineer does not get to do what she wants to do—or worse, in her eyes, to do what she believes is right—these forces come into play. I believe that if more people understood them, there would be less conflict between engineers and their superiors.

My initials are GAD, and people often call me by that acronym. It is with the utmost humility that I present to you GAD’s Maxims.

Maxim #1

The driving forces of network design are summarized here:

  • Politics

  • Money

  • The right way to do it

Note

GAD’s Maxim #1: Network designs are based on politics, money, and the right way to do it—in that order.

Figure 40-1 shows it all in a nutshell. The idea is simple, really. Engineers want to “do it the right way,” which is usually considered best practice. To do whatever it is “the right way,” money will be required. To get money, someone will have to be adept at politics. To put it another way, if you want to do it the right way, you need money, and the only way to get money is through politics. I can hear your voices in my head as you read this, groaning, “I hate politics.” The truth is, you don’t hate politics—you hate dirty politics. There is a distinct difference between the two.

Let’s take a closer look at ...

Find the exact information you need to solve a problem on the fly, or go deeper to master the technologies and skills you need to succeed

Start Free Trial

No credit card required