You are previewing Network Topology in Command and Control.
O'Reilly logo
Network Topology in Command and Control

Book Description

Over the past decade, the Command and Control (C2) field has been making a transformation from top-down, directive command to Network Centric Operations (NCO), peer-to-peer negation, self-synchronization, and agility. As the terms NCO and NEC suggest, C2 systems are regarded as networks, rather than a hierarchy. Accordingly, it is appropriate to view the C2 process and C2 systems through the lens of network theory. Network Topology in Command and Control: Organization, Operation, and Evolution aims to connect the fields of C2 and network science. Featuring timely research on topics pertaining to the C2 network evolution, security, and modeling, this publication is ideal for reference use by students, academicians, and security professionals in the fields of C2 and network science.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. Title Page
  3. Copyright Page
  4. Book Series
  5. Editorial Advisory Board and List of Reviewers
    1. List of Reviewers
  6. Foreword
    1. FROM COMBAT ADVANTAGE TO PREPAREDNESS FOR UNDEFINED CONNECTIVITY
  7. Preface
    1. INTRODUCTION
    2. STATE OF THE ART
    3. ANALYSIS FRAMEWORK
    4. ADVANCES TO STATE OF THE ART
    5. FUTURE RESEARCH DIRECTIONS
    6. CONCLUSION
    7. REFERENCES
  8. Acknowledgment
  9. Chapter 1: De-Conflicting Civil-Military Networks
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. CLOUD COMPELLER
    3. INTRODUCTION
    4. CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK
    5. MANAGING THE LIBYAN THEATER: OPERATION UNIFIED PROTECTOR AND CIVILIAN ORGANIZATIONS
    6. LESSONS LEARNED AND CONCEPTUAL ANALYSIS
    7. CONCLUSION
    8. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
    9. REFERENCES
    10. KEY TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
    11. ENDNOTES
    12. APPENDIX
  10. Chapter 2: Shaping Comprehensive Emergency Response Networks
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. EMERGENCY AND COMMUNITY
    4. EMERGENCY RESPONSE NETWORKS
    5. FUTURE RESEARCH DIRECTIONS
    6. CONCLUSION
    7. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
    8. REFERENCES
    9. ADDITIONAL READING
    10. KEY TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
    11. ENDNOTES
    12. APPENDIX
  11. Chapter 3: Networked Operations
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. BACKGROUND
    4. MILITARY NETWORK PARAMETERS
    5. FUTURE RESEARCH DIRECTIONS
    6. CONCLUSION
    7. REFERENCES
    8. ADDITIONAL READING
    9. KEY TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
    10. APPENDIX
  12. Chapter 4: Modelling Command and Control in Networks
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. BACKGROUND
    4. MODELING C2 IN NETWORKS
    5. FUTURE RESEARCH DIRECTIONS
    6. CONCLUSION
    7. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
    8. REFERENCES
    9. ADDITIONAL READING
    10. KEY TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
    11. APPENDIX
  13. Chapter 5: Formalized Ontology for Representing C2 Systems as Layered Networks
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. ONTOLOGY ENGINEERING
    4. DOMAIN AND SCOPE OF ONTOLOGY
    5. FORMALIZATION OF ONTOLOGY
    6. CASE STUDY: 9-11 REVISITED
    7. RELATED WORK
    8. CONCLUSION
    9. FURTHER RESEARCH
    10. REFERENCES
    11. ADDITIONAL READING
    12. KEY TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
    13. APPENDIX
  14. Chapter 6: Modeling C2 Networks as Dependencies
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. OVERVIEW OF MODELING C2 NETWORKS AS INTER-CONNECTED NETWORKS
    3. MODELING C2 NETWORK VIA DEPENDENCIES
    4. DEPENDENCY AND CONSEQUENCE PROPAGATION
    5. APPLICATIONS OF DEPENDENCY BASED NETWORK ANALYSIS
    6. CONCLUSION
    7. REFERENCES
    8. KEY TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
    9. ENDNOTES
    10. APPENDIX
  15. Chapter 7: Dynamical Network Structures in Multi-Layered Networks
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. STOCHASTIC ACTOR-BASED MODELS FOR NETWORK DYNAMICS
    4. A NEW PRINCIPLE TO EVALUATE NETWORKS: COVERING
    5. INVESTIGATIONS INTO CHARACTERISTICS OF DYNAMICALLY CHANGING NETWORKS
    6. STOCHASTIC ACTOR-BASED MODELS FOR MULTI-LAYERED NETWORKS
    7. CONCLUSION
    8. FUTURE RESEARCH DIRECTIONS
    9. TECHNICAL REMARKS ABOUT COVERING AND W-COVERING
    10. REFERENCES
    11. KEY TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
    12. APPENDIX
  16. Chapter 8: Improving C2 Effectiveness Based on Robust Connectivity
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. THE INFORMATION AGE COMBAT MODEL
    4. APPLICATION FOR PRACTITIONERS
    5. CONCLUSION
    6. REFERENCES
    7. ADDITIONAL READING
    8. KEY TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
    9. APPENDIX
  17. Chapter 9: C2, Networks, and Self-Synchronization
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. NETWORK TOPOLOGY AND PROBLEM TYPE
    4. EDGE ORGANIZATIONS
    5. SELF-SYNCHRONIZATION
    6. A “FLOCKING” EXAMPLE
    7. SELF-SYNCHRONIZATION AND AGILITY
    8. CONCLUSION
    9. FUTURE RESEARCH DIRECTIONS
    10. REFERENCES
    11. KEY TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
    12. APPENDIX
  18. Chapter 10: Complex Adaptive Information Networks for Defence
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. INFORMATION SHARING NETWORK STRUCTURE AT LEVEL 1
    4. SELF-SYNCHRONIZATION IN THE COGNITIVE DOMAIN AT LEVEL 2
    5. SELF-SYNCHRONIZATION IN THE PHYSICAL DOMAIN AT LEVEL 3
    6. CONCLUSION
    7. REFERENCES
    8. KEY TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
    9. ENDNOTES
    10. APPENDIX
  19. Chapter 11: Cyber Security in Tactical Network Infrastructure for Command and Control
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. CHALLENGING ENVIRONMENTS
    4. THE EVOLUTION OF TACTICAL COMMUNICATIONS
    5. THE FUTURE OF TACTICAL COMMUNICATIONS
    6. DISCUSSION
    7. CONCLUSION
    8. REFERENCES
    9. ADDITIONAL READING
    10. KEY TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
    11. APPENDIX
  20. Chapter 12: Smart Surveillance Systems
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. RELATED WORK
    4. ASPECTS OF SENSOR AND OPERATOR SURVEILLANCE SYSTEMS
    5. CASE AIS-SYSTEM
    6. CONCLUSION
    7. FUTURE RESEARCH DIRECTIONS
    8. REFERENCES
    9. KEY TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
    10. APPENDIX
  21. Compilation of References
  22. About the Contributors