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Multihop Wireless Networks: Opportunistic Routing by Ming Li, Wenjing Lou, Kai Zeng

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8.1 System Model

In this chapter, we consider the local MGOR scenario as in the example in Figure 8.1. Assume node S, i.e., the sender, is forwarding a packet to a remote destination D. S can transmit the packet at k different rates R1, R2, …, Rk. Each rate corresponds to a communication range, within which the nodes can receive the packet sent by S with some non-negligible probability, which is larger than a threshold, e.g., 0.1. The available next-hop node set images/c08_I0001.gif (1 ≤ jk) of node S under a particular transmission rate Rj is defined as all the nodes in the communication range of S that are closer to D than S. We denote the nodes in images/c08_I0002.gif as images/c08_I0003.gif, where images/c08_I0004.gif. In a similar way to geographic routing (Karp and Kung 2000; Lee et al. 2005; Seada et al. 2004), we assume S is aware of the location information of itself, its one-hop neighbors and the destination D. Define the packet advancement as images/c08_I0005.gif in Equation (8.1), which is the Euclidian distance between the sender and destination (d(S, D)) minus the Euclidian ...

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