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Multi-Agent Systems for Education and Interactive Entertainment

Book Description

The increased sophistication of the multi-agent software now becoming available is allowing much more sophisticated learning scenarios to be attempted.  This has caused interest in the role of artificial intelligence in interactive systems to grow in recent years. Increasingly powerful consumer hardware makes research-level AI usable in real-world games and/or immersive learning environments.Multi-Agent Systems for Education and Interactive Entertainment: Design, Use and Experience presents readers with a rich collection of ideas from researchers who are exploring the complex tradeoffs that must be made in designing agent systems for education and interactive entertainment. This book aims to provide a mixture of relevant theoretical and practical understanding of the use of multi-agent systems in educational and entertainment research, together with practical examples of the use of such systems in real application scenarios.  

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. Title Page
  3. Copyright Page
  4. Editorial Advisory Board and List of Reviewers
    1. EDITORIAL ADVISORY BOARD
    2. LIST OF REVIEWERS
  5. Preface
  6. Acknowledgment
  7. Section 1: Teaching Agent-Based Systems within Computing
    1. Chapter 1: MAgICS
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION AND MOTIVATION
      3. RELATED WORK
      4. THE MAGICS FRAMEWORK
      5. IMPLEMENTING MAGICS: A PILOT STUDY
      6. DISCUSSION AND FUTURE RESEARCH DIRECTIONS
      7. CONCLUSION
    2. Chapter 2: An Intelligent Agents and Multi-Agent Systems Course Involving NetLogo
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. THE PRACTICAL DIMENSION OF AMAS COURSES
      4. THE INTELLIGENT AGENTS COURSE
      5. AN AGENT SIMULATION ENVIRONMENT
      6. EXTENDING NETLOGO FOR BDI-LIKE AGENTS
      7. EXTENDING NETLOGO WITH FIPA-LIKE MESSAGE PASSING
      8. THE TAXI TRANSPORTATION PROBLEM AS COURSEWORK ASSIGNMENT
      9. CONCLUSIONS AND FUTURE WORK
    3. Chapter 3: Adapting Rewards to Encourage Creativity
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. BACKGROUND
      4. DESCRIPTION OF SEREBRO
      5. MULTIAGENT SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE FOR REWARD ALLOCATION
      6. EVALUATION AND RESULTS
      7. CONCLUSION AND FUTURE WORK
    4. Chapter 4: A Multiagent Approach to Teaching Complex Systems Development
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. MAS FRAMEWORK
      4. AGENT LIBRARY
      5. ARCHITECTURES
      6. EVALUATION
      7. CONCLUSION
  8. Section 2: Teaching Agent-Based Systems beyond Computing
    1. Chapter 5: Introducing AI and IA into a Non Computer Science Graduate Programme
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. THE CONTEXT: A MASTER’S PROGRAMME IN TECHNOLOGY, INNOVATION AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP
      4. DESIGN OF THE COURSE
      5. TEACHING ADMINISTRATION, COORDINATION AND COHERENCE
      6. MOTIVATION: CAPTURING THE STUDENTS’ INTEREST
      7. DELIVERY
      8. COURSEWORK ASSIGNMENT
      9. DISCUSSION
      10. CONCLUSION
    2. Chapter 6: Introducing Multiagent Systems to Undergraduates through Games and Chocolate
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. MULTIAGENT SYSTEMS FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS
      4. ISSUES IN USING SCIENCE FICTION AND GAMES
      5. THE BIG PICTURE: PHILOSOPHICAL, ETHICAL AND SOCIAL ISSUES
      6. FEEDBACK AND LESSONS LEARNED
      7. SUMMARY AND RELATED COURSEWORK
      8. Appendix I: Detailed Syllabus
  9. Section 3: Using Agent Systems in Educational and Training Contexts: Educational Uses of Multi-User Virtual Environments
    1. Chapter 7: Survey of Educational Multi-User Virtual Environments and Agents
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. CURRENT USE OF MUVES: FOCUSING ON TRAINING AND EDUCATION
      4. ISSUES WITH MUVES
      5. AGENTS
      6. CONCLUSION
    2. Chapter 8: A Comparative Study of Platforms for Multi-User Virtual Environments
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. BACKGROUND
      4. CHOOSING THE RIGHT AGENT-PLATFORM: A SET OF METRICS
      5. AGENT PLATFORM COMPARISONS
      6. CONCLUSION
  10. Section 4: Using Agent Systems in Educational and Training Contexts: Specific Issues and Solutions
    1. Chapter 9: Agents with a Theory of Mind in Virtual Training
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. THEORIES OF THEORY OF MIND
      4. AGENTS WITH A THEORY OF MIND
      5. PROGRAMMING AGENTS WITH A THEORY OF MIND
      6. ILLUSTRATION: AN IMPLEMENTATION OF THE TRAINING SCENARIO
      7. RELATED WORK
      8. CONCLUSION
    2. Chapter 10: Computers Can Feel Too
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. COMPUTER MEDIATED COMMUNICATION AND EMOTIONS
      4. EMOTIONS, LEARNING AND AGENTS
      5. EXISTING EMOTIONAL AGENTS
      6. REQUIREMENTS FOR FUTURE INTELLIGENT EMOTIONAL AGENTS
      7. A GENERIC MODEL FOR INTELLIGENT EMOTIONAL AGENTS FOR E-LEARNING
      8. CONCLUSION
    3. Chapter 11: Scenario Authoring by Domain Trainers
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. BACKGROUND
      4. THE ISSUES
      5. ADDRESSING THE ISSUES
      6. EVALUATING USABILITY
      7. FUTURE WORK
      8. SUMMARY AND CONCLUSION
    4. Chapter 12: Crafting a Personalised Agent-Oriented Mobile E-Learning Platform for Adaptive Third Level Education
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. RELATED WORK
      4. PERSONALISED AGENT-BASED MOBILE LEARNING PLATFORM
      5. METHODOLOGY AND APPROACH
      6. FUNCTIONALITY
      7. CONCLUSION AND FUTURE WORK
    5. Chapter 13: How to Build up Recommender Agents, Step by Step
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. AUTONOMY & INTROSPECTION: RECOMMENDATION TECHNIQUES
      4. DECISION
      5. NEGOTIATION BY AUCTIONS
      6. FINAL TA COURSE WORK ASSIGNMENT AND CONCLUSIONS
  11. Compilation of References
  12. About the Contributors