You are previewing MORE JOEL ON SOFTWARE: Further Thoughts on Diverse and Occasionally Related Matters That Will Prove of Interest to Software Developers, Designers, and Managers, and to Those Who, Whether by Good Fortune or Ill Luck, Work with Them in Some Capacity.

MORE JOEL ON SOFTWARE: Further Thoughts on Diverse and Occasionally Related Matters That Will Prove of Interest to Software Developers, Designers, and Managers, and to Those Who, Whether by Good Fortune or Ill Luck, Work with Them in Some Capacity

  1. Title Page
  2. Dedication
  3. CONTENTS
  4. JOEL, APRESS, BLOGS, AND BLOOKS
  5. ABOUT THE AUTHOR
  6. part one: Managing People
    1. one: MY FIRST BILLG REVIEW
    2. two: FINDING GREAT DEVELOPERS
      1. Where are all those great developers?
      2. Can I get them anyway?
      3. To the mountain, Jeeves!
      4. Internships
      5. Build the community (*hard)
      6. Employee referrals: may be slippery when wet
      7. A field guide to developers
    3. three: A FIELD GUIDE TO DEVELOPERS
      1. Private offices
      2. The physical workspace
      3. Toys
      4. The social life of developers
      5. What am I working on?
      6. Can I identify with the company?
      7. One thing that programmers don't care about
    4. four: THREE MANAGEMENT METHODS (INTRODUCTION)
    5. five: THE COMMAND AND CONTROL MANAGEMENT METHOD
    6. six: THE ECON 101 MANAGEMENT METHOD
    7. seven: THE IDENTITY MANAGEMENT METHOD
      1. Conclusion
  7. part two: Advice to Potential Programmers
    1. eight: THE PERILS OF JAVASCHOOLS
    2. nine: TALK AT YALE
    3. ten: ADVICE FOR COMPUTER SCIENCE COLLEGE STUDENTS
      1. Learn how to write before graduating
      2. Learn C before graduating
      3. Learn microeconomics before graduating
      4. Don't blow off non-CS classes just because they're boring
      5. Take programming-intensive courses
      6. Stop worrying about all the jobs going to India
      7. No matter what you do, get a good summer internship
  8. part three: The Impact of Design
    1. eleven: FONT SMOOTHING, ANTI-ALIASING, AND SUBPIXEL RENDERING
    2. twelve: A GAME OF INCHES
    3. thirteen: THE BIG PICTURE
    4. fourteen: CHOICES = HEADACHES
    5. fifteen: IT'S NOT JUST USABILITY
      1. Some examples
      2. Designing social software
      3. Marketing social interfaces
      4. A new field
    6. sixteen: BUILDING COMMUNITIES WITH SOFTWARE
  9. part four: MANAGING LARGE PROJECTS
    1. seventeen: MARTIAN HEADSETS
    2. eighteen: WHY ARE THE MICROSOFT OFFICE FILE FORMATS SO COMPLICATED? (AND SOME WORKAROUNDS)
    3. nineteen: WHERE THERE'S MUCK, THERE'S BRASS
  10. part five: Programming Advice
    1. twenty: EVIDENCE-BASED SCHEDULING
      1. 1. Break 'er down
      2. 2. Track elapsed time
      3. 3. Simulate the future
      4. Obsessive-compulsive disorder not required
      5. 4. Manage your projects actively
      6. Scope creep
      7. While we're at it
      8. Summary
      9. P.S.
    2. twenty-one: STRATEGY LETTER VI
      1. Limited-memory, limited-CPU environments
      2. A portable programming language
      3. High interactivity and UI standards
    3. twenty-two: CAN YOUR PROGRAMMING LANGUAGE DO THIS?
    4. twenty-three: MAKING WRONG CODE LOOK WRONG
      1. An example
      2. A general rule
      3. I'm Hungary
      4. More reading
  11. part six: Starting a Software Business
    1. twenty-four: FOREWORD TO ERIC SINK ON THE BUSINESS OF SOFTWARE
    2. twenty-five: FOREWORD TO MICRO-ISV: FROM VISION TO REALITY
    3. twenty-six: HITTING THE HIGH NOTES
      1. But wait, there's more!
      2. But wait, there's even more!
  12. part seven: Running a Software Business
    1. twenty-seven: BIONIC OFFICE
      1. Bottom line it for me
    2. twenty-eight: UP THE TATA WITHOUT A TUTU
    3. twenty-nine: SIMPLICITY
    4. thirty: RUB A DUB DUB
    5. thirty-one: TOP TWELVE TIPS FOR RUNNING A BETA TEST
    6. thirty-two: SEVEN STEPS TO REMARKABLE CUSTOMER SERVICE
      1. 1. Fix everything two ways
      2. 2. Suggest blowing out the dust
      3. 3. Make customers into fans
      4. 4. Take the blame
      5. 5. Memorize awkward phrases
      6. 6. Practice puppetry
      7. 7. Greed will get you nowhere
      8. 8. (Bonus!) Give customer service people a career path
  13. part eight: Releasing Software
    1. thirty-three: PICKING A SHIP DATE
    2. thirty-four: CAMELS AND RUBBER DUCKIES
      1. Some economic theory
  14. part nine: Revising Software
    1. thirty-five: FIVE WHYS
    2. thirty-six: SET YOUR PRIORITIES
  15. INDEX
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JOEL, APRESS, BLOGS, AND BLOOKS

"A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away . . ." Well, actually it was late in 2000, during Apress's first full year of operation. We were a tiny little computer book publisher then, with little name recognition, and we planned to publish only a handful of books that year—roughly as many books for that whole year as Apress now publishes in a single month.

I was learning the hard way about how to be a publisher and probably spending way too much time looking at web sites and programming than I should have in response to that. Anyway, one day I came across this web site called Joel on Software, which was run by a guy with strong opinions and an unusual, clever writing style, along with a willingness to take on ...

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