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Modern MIDI

Book Description

In the last five years, the environment in which the Musical Instrument Digital Interface (MIDI) specification works and the tools that communicate via MIDI have changed dramatically. Modern MIDI: Sequencing and Performing Using Traditional and Mobile Tools gives you all the tools you need to properly and effectively use MIDI in a modern setting, while still incorporating vintage MIDI gear. Exploring typical workflows and techniques for both the studio and the performing environment, this book helps you navigate the changes that mobile computing has made to the way the music producers and engineers work with MIDI.

If you’re a MIDI user seeking to increase your efficiency and productivity while still gaining an understanding of the fundamentals of MIDI, or a music professional looking to incorporate your mobile devices into your creative process, this is the book for you. Modern MIDI shows you how to implement the necessary components to use MIDI on your iPad, Android phone, or laptop.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. Title
  3. Copyright
  4. CONTENTS
  5. Dedication
  6. Acknowledgments
  7. 1 Introduction to MIDI
    1. 1. MIDI Is Everywhere
    2. 2. MIDI Is Incapable of Making Sound by Itself
    3. 3. It Is Possible to Successfully Use MIDI without Knowing Anything about It
    4. 4. Famous People Use MIDI
    5. 5. MIDI Isn’t Just for Music
    6. 6. MIDI’s Magic Number Is 128
    7. 7. The Key to Using MIDI Is Being a Skilled Musician
    8. 8. MIDI Is a Huge Time Saver/Waster
    9. 9. The Differences between Digital Audio and MIDI Are Fewer and Fewer
    10. 10. MIDI Has Changed Very Little in the Past 30 Years
    11. MIDI Data
    12. Types of MIDI Messages
    13. Channel Mode Messages (Subset of Control Change Messages)
    14. System Messages
    15. System Common Messages
    16. System Real-Time Messages
    17. System Exclusive Messages
    18. MIDI Controllers and Subprotocols
    19. CS-10 Controller Assignments
    20. Understanding Parts per Quarter Note
    21. Binary Numbers
    22. Reading Binary
    23. MIDI Files
    24. General MIDI
    25. GS and XG
    26. GM 2
    27. Running Status
    28. Summary
  8. 2 MIDI Hardware
    1. Five-pin DIN MIDI Cables
    2. USB
    3. FireWire
    4. Ethernet
    5. PCI Cards
    6. Wireless (WiFi)
    7. Hardware Devices
    8. Local MIDI Settings
    9. Global Settings
    10. Local Control
    11. Hardware Configurations
    12. Summary
  9. 3 Mobile MIDI
    1. iPad Apps
    2. iPad Instruments
    3. Making Connections
    4. Connecting Wirelessly
    5. Audio MIDI Setup
    6. Example App/AC-7 Core
    7. Third Party Software
    8. MIDI on Android
    9. MIDI/OSC Control
    10. Musical Instrument Apps
    11. Loop/Sequencer/Sample Apps
    12. Multi-Track Recording Apps
    13. MIDI Considerations when Choosing Instrument Apps
    14. Controllers and Control Surfaces
    15. Sequencers and DAWs
    16. MIDI Utilities
  10. 4 Recording MIDI
    1. Different Entry Methods
    2. Live Performance
    3. Troubleshooting MIDI Inputs
    4. Project Settings
    5. Key Signature
    6. Exercise
    7. Tempo
    8. Conductor Track
    9. Click Track
    10. Exercises
    11. Sounds
    12. Exercises
    13. Latency
    14. Keep the MIDI Path as Simple as Possible
    15. Keep Your MIDI Device Drivers Up to Date
    16. Use a Reliable Audio Device with Pro-Quality Drivers
    17. Use Your DAW’s Feature Set to Manage Latency
    18. Templates
    19. Additional Controllers
    20. Examples
    21. Downloading MIDI Files
    22. Alternative Performance Techniques
    23. How Triggering Works
    24. Percussion Tracks
    25. Summary
  11. 5 Editing MIDI
    1. Basic Tools and Manual Editing
    2. Quantization
    3. Notation Editors
    4. Advanced and Unique Tools
    5. Basic Tools and Manual Editing
    6. Survey of Typical Tools
    7. Typical Editing Workflow
    8. Example 1
    9. Example 2
    10. Example 3
    11. Additional Editing
    12. Quantization
    13. Note Value
    14. Strength and Sensitivity
    15. Swing
    16. Randomization
    17. Groove Quantization
    18. Examples
    19. Notation
    20. Working with Notation
    21. Note Entry
    22. Editing
    23. Advanced and Unique Tools
    24. Alternate Storage
    25. Transformation Tools
    26. Making MIDI Musical
    27. Imitation Is the Truest Form of Flattery
    28. Comparisons
    29. Groove Quantize
    30. Tempo Changes
    31. Envelopes
    32. Built-In Envelopes
    33. Track Automation
    34. Effects
  12. 6 Mixing
    1. Level Adjustment
    2. Overall Level
    3. Placement in the Stereo Field
    4. Effects
    5. Graphic Equalizer
    6. Parametric Equalizer
    7. Time-Based Effects
    8. Automation
    9. Example—Sculpting Sound Sources
    10. Note
  13. 7 Using MIDI Live
    1. Traditional Setups
    2. MIDI Control
    3. DJs and Electronic Artists
    4. DAWs and Sequencers
    5. MIDI Mapping
    6. OSC
    7. Controllerism
    8. Expressive Control
  14. 8 Music Theory Primer
    1. The Elements of Music
    2. Musical Texture
    3. Music Notation
    4. Ledger Lines
    5. The Musical Alphabet
    6. The Grand Staff
    7. The Piano Keyboard
    8. Sharps and Flats
    9. The Five Accidentals
    10. Note Values
    11. Time Signatures
    12. Notation Protocol
    13. Counting Beats
    14. Ties
    15. Dotted Notes
    16. Sixteenth Notes
    17. Compound and Simple Meter
    18. Duple, Triple, and Quadruple Time
    19. Musical Road Maps
    20. Major Scales
    21. Key Signatures
    22. The Circle of Fifths
    23. Magic Seven
    24. Interval Summary
    25. Summary of Triad Construction
    26. Chord Symbol Protocol for Triads
    27. The Harmonic System
    28. Chord Progressions
  15. 9 Interviews
    1. John Swihart
    2. George Strezov
    3. Dr. Noize
    4. C. J. Drummeler
    5. Jonathan Hillman
    6. Matt Moldover
    7. Kenny Bergle
    8. Jay Smith
    9. John Staskevich—Highly Liquid
  16. 10 History of MIDI
    1. MIDI—The Early Days
    2. The First MIDI Instruments
    3. MIDI—Early Computers
    4. MIDI Interfaces
    5. MIDI—GM and the Web
    6. MIDI—Implementation Charts
    7. Drum Machines
    8. Software Instruments
    9. MIDI—Mobile Revolution
    10. Sequential Circuits Prophet 600
    11. Roland Jupiter–6
    12. Yamaha DX7
    13. Akai S900
    14. E-mu Virtuoso 2000
    15. Fairlight CMI (Series I–III)
    16. Akai MPC60
    17. Sequential Circuits Studio 440
  17. 11 Exploring the Future of MIDI
    1. Known MIDI Issues
    2. HD–MIDI
    3. HD–MIDI vs. OSC
  18. 12 Appendix
    1. Introduction
    2. All Pages
    3. Page 1: Basic Information, MIDI Timing and Synchronization, and Extensions Compatibility?
    4. Pages 2 and 3: Control Number Information
    5. MIDI Messages
    6. General MIDI 1, 2, and Lite Specifications
    7. General MIDI 2 (GM2)
    8. GM2 Specification Update 1.1
    9. GM2 Specification Update 1.2
    10. GM2 Features
    11. GM2 Developer Information
    12. General MIDI “Lite” (GML)
    13. GM Lite vs. SP-MIDI
    14. GM Lite vs. GM1
    15. GM Lite Features
    16. GM Lite Developer Information
    17. Computer Audio Comes of Age
    18. MIDI: Let’s Share the ‘Secret’
    19. White Paper: Comparison of MIDI and OSC
    20. Notes
  19. Index