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Modern Control System Theory and Design, 2nd Edition

Book Description

The definitive guide to control system design

Modern Control System Theory and Design, Second Edition offers the most comprehensive treatment of control systems available today. Its unique text/software combination integrates classical and modern control system theories, while promoting an interactive, computer-based approach to design solutions. The sheer volume of practical examples, as well as the hundreds of illustrations of control systems from all engineering fields, make this volume accessible to students and indispensable for professional engineers.

This fully updated Second Edition features a new chapter on modern control system design, including state-space design techniques, Ackermann's formula for pole placement, estimation, robust control, and the H method for control system design. Other notable additions to this edition are:

  • Free MATLAB software containing problem solutions, which can be retrieved from The Mathworks, Inc., anonymous FTP server at ftp://ftp.mathworks.com/pub/books/shinners

  • Programs and tutorials on the use of MATLAB incorporated directly into the text

  • A complete set of working digital computer programs

  • Reviews of commercial software packages for control system analysis

  • An extensive set of new, worked-out, illustrative solutions added in dedicated sections at the end of chapters

  • Expanded end-of-chapter problems--one-third with answers to facilitate self-study

  • An updated solutions manual containing solutions to the remaining two-thirds of the problems

Superbly organized and easy-to-use, Modern Control System Theory and Design, Second Edition is an ideal textbook for introductory courses in control systems and an excellent professional reference. Its interdisciplinary approach makes it invaluable for practicing engineers in electrical, mechanical, aeronautical, chemical, and nuclear engineering and related areas.

Table of Contents

  1. Coverpage
  2. Titlepage
  3. Copyright
  4. Dedication
  5. Contents
  6. Preface
  7. 1 General Concept of Control-System Design
    1. 1.1. Introduction
    2. 1.2. Open-Loop Control Systems
    3. 1.3. Closed-Loop Control Systems
    4. 1.4. Human Control Systems
    5. 1.5. Modern Control-System Applications with a Preview of the Future
    6. 1.6. Illustrative Problems and Solutions
    7. Problems
    8. References
  8. 2 Mathematical Techniques for Control-System Analysis
    1. 2.1. Introduction
    2. 2.2. Review of Complex Variables, Complex Functions, and the s Plane
    3. 2.3. Review of Fourier Series and Fourier Transform
    4. 2.4. Review of the Laplace Transform
    5. 2.5. Useful Laplace Transforms
    6. 2.6. Important Properties of the Laplace Transform
    7. 2.7. Inversion by Partial Fraction Expansion
    8. 2.8. Application of MATLAB to Control Systems
    9. 2.9. Inversion with Partial Fraction Expansion Using MATLAB
    10. 2.10. Laplace-Transform Solution of Differential Equations
    11. 2.11. Transfer-Function Concept
    12. 2.12. Transfer Functions of Common Networks
    13. 2.13. Transfer Functions of Systems
    14. 2.14. Signal-Flow Graphs and Mason’s Theorem
    15. 2.15. Reduction of the Signal-Flow Graph
    16. 2.16. Application of Mason’s Theorem and the Signal-Flow Graph to Multiple-Feeback Systems
    17. 2.17. Disturbance Signals in Feedback Control Systems
    18. 2.18. Operational Amplifiers
    19. 2.19. Simulation Diagrams
    20. 2.20. Review of Matrix Algebra
    21. 2.21. State-Variable Concepts
    22. 2.22. State-Variable Diagram
    23. 2.23. Transformation Between the State-Space Form and the Transfer Function Form using MATLAB
    24. 2.24. Digital Computer Evaluation of the Time Response
    25. 2.25. Obtaining the Transient Response of Systems Using MATLAB
    26. 2.26. State Transition Matrix
    27. 2.27. Total Solution of the State Equation
    28. 2.28. Evaluation of the State Transition Matrix from an Exponential Series
    29. 2.29. Summary
    30. 2.30. Illustrative Problems and Solutions
    31. Problems
    32. References
  9. 3 State Equations and Transfer-Function Representation of Physical Linear Control-System Elements
    1. 3.1. Introduction
    2. 3.2. State Equations of Electrical Networks
    3. 3.3. Transfer-Function and State-Variable Representation of Typical Mechanical Control-System Devices
    4. 3.4. Transfer-Function and State-Variable Representation of Typical Electromechanical Control-System Devices
    5. 3.5. Transfer-Function and State-Variable Representation of Typical Hydraulic Devices
    6. 3.6. Transfer-Function Representation of Thermal Systems
    7. 3.7. A Generalized Approach for Modeling—the Principles of Conservation and Analogy
    8. 3.8. Illustrative Problems and Solutions
    9. Problems
    10. References
  10. 4 Second-Order Systems
    1. 4.1. Introduction
    2. 4.2. Characteristic Responses of Second-Order Control Systems
    3. 4.3. Relation Between Location of Roots in the s-Plane and the Transient Response
    4. 4.4. State-Variable Signal-Flow Graph of a Second-Order System
    5. 4.5. What is the Best Damping Ratio to Use?
    6. 4.6. Modeling the Transfer Functions of Control Systems
    7. 4.7. Illustrative Problems and Solutions
    8. Problems
    9. References
  11. 5 Performance Criteria
    1. 5.1. Introduction
    2. 5.2. Stability
    3. 5.3. Sensitivity
    4. 5.4. Static Accuracy
    5. 5.5. Transient Response
    6. 5.6. Performance Indices
    7. 5.7. Zero-Error Systems
    8. 5.8. The ITAE Performance Criterion for Optimizing the Transient Response
    9. 5.9. Other Practical Considerations
    10. 5.10. Illustrative Problems and Solutions
    11. Problems
    12. References
  12. 6 Techniques for Determining Control-System Stability
    1. 6.1. Introduction
    2. 6.2. Determining the Characteristic Equation using Conventional and State-Variable Methods
    3. 6.3. Routh—Hurwitz Stability Criterion
    4. 6.4. Mapping Contours From the s-Plane to the F(s)-Plane
    5. 6.5. Nyquist Stability Criterion
    6. 6.6. Nyquist Diagrams Using MATLAB
    7. 6.7. Bode-Diagram Approach
    8. 6.8. Bode Diagrams Using MATLAB
    9. 6.9. Digital Computer Programs for Obtaining the Open-Loop and Closed-Loop Frequency Responses and the Time-Domain Response
    10. 6.10. Nichols Chart
    11. 6.11. Nichols Chart Using MATLAB
    12. 6.12. Relationship between Closed-Loop Frequency Response and the Time-Domain Response
    13. 6.13. Closed-Loop Frequency Bandwidth and Cutoff Frequency
    14. 6.14. Root-Locus Method for Negative-Feedback Systems
    15. 6.15. Root Locus of Time-Delay Factors
    16. 6.16. Root-Locus Method for Positive-Feedback Systems
    17. 6.17. Root-Locus Method for Control Systems Using MATLAB
    18. 6.18. Digital Computer Program for Obtaining the Root Locus
    19. 6.19. Control Systems Containing Multiple Gain Margins
    20. 6.20. Comparison of the Nyquist Diagram, Bode Diagram, Nichols Chart, and Root Locus for 12 Commonly Used Transfer Functions
    21. 6.21. Commercially Available Software Packages for Computer-Aided Control-System Design
    22. 6.22. What is the “Best” Stability Analysis Technique? Guidelines for using the Analysis Techniques Presented
    23. 6.23. Illustrative Problems and Solutions
    24. Problems
    25. References
  13. 7 Linear Control-System Compensation and Design
    1. 7.1. Introduction
    2. 7.2. Cascade-Compensation Techniques
    3. 7.3. Minor-Loop Feedback-Compensation Techniques
    4. 7.4. Proportional-Plus-Integral-Plus Derivative (PID) Compensators
    5. 7.5. Example for the Design of a Second-Order Control System
    6. 7.6. Compensation and Design using the Bode-Diagram Method
    7. 7.7. Approximate Methods for Preliminary Compensation and Design using the Bode Diagram
    8. 7.8. Compensation and Design using the Nichols Chart
    9. 7.9. Compensation and Design using the Root-Locus Method
    10. 7.10. Tradeoffs of using Various Cascade-Compensation Methods and Minor-Loop Feedback
    11. 7.11. Illustrative Problems and Solutions
    12. Problems
    13. References
  14. 8 Modern Control-System Design using State-Space, Pole Placement, Ackermann’s Formula, Estimation, Robust Control, and H∞ Techniques
    1. 8.1. Introduction
    2. 8.2. Pole-Placement Design using Linear-State-Variable Feedback
    3. 8.3. Controller Design using Pole Placement and Linear-State-Variable Feedback Techniques
    4. 8.4. Controllability
    5. 8.5. Observability
    6. 8.6. Ackermann’s Formula for Design using Pole Placement
    7. 8.7. Estimator Design in Conjunction with the Pole Placement Approach using Linear-State-Variable Feedback
    8. 8.8. Combined Compensator Design Including a Controller and an Estimator for a Regulator System
    9. 8.9. Extension of Combined Compensator Design Including a Controller and an Estimator for Systems Containing a Reference Input
    10. 8.10. Robust Control Systems
    11. 8.11. An Introduction to H∞ Control Concepts
    12. 8.12. Foundations of H∞ Control Theory
    13. 8.13. Linear Algebraic Aspects of Control-System Design Computations
    14. 8.14. Illustrative Problems and Solutions
    15. Problems
    16. References
  15. Appendix A Laplace-Transform Table
  16. Appendix B Proof of the Nyquist Stability Criterion
  17. Answers to Selected Problems
  18. Index