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Model Driven Engineering for Distributed Real-Time Embedded Systems 2009: Advances, Standards, Applications and Perspectives

Book Description

Model-based development methods, and supporting technologies, can provide the techniques and tools needed to address the dilemma between reducing system development costs and time, and developing increasingly complex systems. This book provides the information needed to understand and apply model-drive engineering (MDE) and model-drive architecture (MDA) approaches to the development of embedded systems. Chapters, written by experts from academia and industry, cover topics relating to MDE practices and methods, as well as emerging MDE technologies. Much of the writing is based on the presentations given at the Summer School "MDE for Embedded Systems" held at Brest, France, in September 2004.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. Title Page
  3. Copyright
  4. Chapter Summary
  5. Chapter 1: Model Transformation: A Survey of the State of the Art
    1. 1.1. Model-driven engineering
    2. 1.2. Model transformation
      1. 1.2.1. Definitions
      2. 1.2.2. Taxonomy
    3. 1.3. Model transformation languages
    4. 1.4. Model transformation activities
    5. 1.5. Conclusion
    6. 1.6. Acknowledgements
    7. 1.7. Bibliography
  6. Chapter 2: Model-Based Code Generation
    1. 2.1. Introduction
    2. 2.2. The model-driven architecture (MBA) process
    3. 2.3. The automated approach to code generation
    4. 2.4. Domain modeling
    5. 2.5. The executable UML (xUML) formalism
    6. 2.6. System generation
    7. 2.7. Executable UML to code mappings
    8. 2.8. Conclusions
    9. 2.9. Bibliography
  7. Chapter 3: Testing Model Transformations: A Case for Test Generation from Input Domain Models
    1. 3.1. Introduction
    2. 3.2. Challenges for testing systems with large input domains
      1. 3.2.1. Large set of input data
      2. 3.2.2. Configurable systems
      3. 3.2.3. Grammarware and model transformations
      4. 3.2.4. Testing challenges
    3. 3.3. Selecting test data in large domains
      1. 3.3.1. Category partition
      2. 3.3.2. Combinatorial interaction testing
    4. 3.4. Metamodel-based test input generation
      1. 3.4.1. Metamodel coverage criteria
      2. 3.4.2. Model and object fragments for test adequacy criteria
      3. 3.4.3. Discussion
      4. 3.4.4. Automatic synthesis of test models
    5. 3.5. Conclusion
    6. 3.6. Acknowledgements
    7. 3.7. Bibliography
  8. Chapter 4: Symbolic Execution-Based Techniques for Conformance Testing
    1. 4.1. Context
      1. 4.1.1. Conformance testing: an introduction
      2. 4.1.2. Conformance relation
      3. 4.1.3. An overview of the approach
    2. 4.2. Input output symbolic transition systems
      1. 4.2.1. Data types
        1. 4.2.1.1. Syntax
        2. 4.2.1.2. Semantics
      2. 4.2.2. Input/output symbolic transition systems
      3. 4.2.3. Semantics
    3. 4.3. Symbolic execution
    4. 4.4. Conformance testing for IOSTS
      1. 4.4.1. Test purposes
      2. 4.4.2. Preliminary definitions and informal description
      3. 4.4.3. Inference rules
    5. 4.5. Concluding remarks
      1. 4.5.1. Choosing test purposes
      2. 4.5.2. Implementation issues
    6. 4.6. Bibliography
  9. Chapter 5: Using MARTE and SysML for Modeling Real-Time Embedded Systems
    1. 5.1. Introduction
    2. 5.2. Background
      1. 5.2.1. UML profiling capabilities
      2. 5.2.2. SysML and MARTE modeling capabilities
    3. 5.3. Scenarios of combined usage
      1. 5.3.1. Defining architecture frameworks
      2. 5.3.2. Requirements engineering
      3. 5.3.3. System-level design integration
      4. 5.3.4. Engineering/quantitative analysis
    4. 5.4. Combination Strategies
      1. 5.4.1. Issues
      2. 5.4.2. Strategies
    5. 5.5. Related work
    6. 5.6. Conclusion
    7. 5.7. Acknowledgements
    8. 5.8. Bibliography
  10. Chapter 6: Software Model-Based Performance Analysis
    1. 6.1. Introduction
    2. 6.2. Performance models
      1. 6.2.1. Queuing network models
      2. 6.2.2. Layered queuing network model
    3. 6.3. Software model with performance annotations
      1. 6.3.1. Performance domain model
      2. 6.3.2. Source model example
    4. 6.4. Mapping from software to performance model
    5. 6.5. Using a pivot language: Core Scenario Model (CSM)
    6. 6.6. Case study performance model
    7. 6.7. Conclusions
    8. 6.8. Acknowledgements
    9. 6.9. Bibliography
  11. Chapter 7: Model Integration for Formal Qualification of Timing-Aware Software Data Acquisition Components
    1. 7.1. Introduction
    2. 7.2. System modeling
      1. 7.2.1. Acquisition system modeling
      2. 7.2.2. Case study
      3. 7.2.3. Formal modeling techniques
        1. 7.2.3.1. System behavior modeling
        2. 7.2.3.2. Context description
        3. 7.2.3.3. Timing observers
    3. 7.3. Variation points modeling
      1. 7.3.1. Variation points definition
      2. 7.3.2. CDL implementation
    4. 7.4. Experiments and results
      1. 7.4.1. Tools
      2. 7.4.2. Experimentations
    5. 7.5. Conclusion
    6. 7.6. Bibliography
  12. Chapter 8: SoC/SoPC Development using MDD and MARTE Profile
    1. 8.1. Introduction
    2. 8.2. Related works
    3. 8.3. MOPCOM process and models
    4. 8.4. Application
    5. 8.5. System analysis
      1. 8.5.1. Requirement analysis
      2. 8.5.2. Functional analysis
      3. 8.5.3. Action language
    6. 8.6. Abstract modeling level
    7. 8.7. Execution modeling level
      1. 8.7.1. The platform independent model/application model in EML
      2. 8.7.2. The platform model in EML
      3. 8.7.3. The platform specific model/allocation model in EML
      4. 8.7.4. Analysis model
    8. 8.8. Detailed modeling level
      1. 8.8.1. Platform model
      2. 8.8.2. Allocation model
    9. 8.9. Tooling Support
      1. 8.9.1. Process validation through metamodeling with Kermeta
      2. 8.9.2. Model transformation and generation with MDWorkbench platform
    10. 8.10. HDL Code Generation
      1. 8.10.1. VHDL code generation
      2. 8.10.2. Rhapsody integration
    11. 8.11. Conclusion
    12. 8.12. Acknowledgements
    13. 8.13. Bibliography
  13. List of Authors
  14. Index