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Mobility Models for Next Generation Wireless Networks: Ad Hoc, Vehicular and Mesh Networks

Book Description

Mobility Models for Next Generation Wireless Networks: Ad Hoc, Vehicular and Mesh Networks provides the reader with an overview of mobility modelling, encompassing both theoretical and practical aspects related to the challenging mobility modelling task. It also:

  • Provides up-to-date coverage of mobility models for next generation wireless networks

  • Offers an in-depth discussion of the most representative mobility models for major next generation wireless network application scenarios, including WLAN/mesh networks, vehicular networks, wireless sensor networks, and opportunistic networks

  • Demonstrates the practices for designing effective protocol/applications for next generation wireless networks

  • Includes case studies showcasing the importance of properly understanding fundamental mobility model properties in wireless network performance evaluation

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. Series Page
  3. Title Page
  4. Copyright
  5. Dedication
  6. List of Figures
  7. List of Tables
  8. About the Author
  9. Preface
    1. Audience
    2. Book Overview
    3. How To Use This Book
  10. Acknowledgments
  11. Part One: Introduction
    1. Chapter 1: Next Generation Wireless Networks
      1. 1.1 WLAN and Mesh Networks
      2. 1.2 Ad Hoc Networks
      3. 1.3 Vehicular Networks
      4. 1.4 Wireless Sensor Networks
      5. 1.5 Opportunistic Networks
      6. References
    2. Chapter 2: Modeling Next Generation Wireless Networks
      1. 2.1 Radio Channel Models
      2. 2.2 The Communication Graph
      3. 2.3 The Energy Model
      4. References
    3. Chapter 3: Mobility Models for Next Generation Wireless Networks
      1. 3.1 Motivation
      2. 3.2 Cellular vs. Next Generation Wireless Network Mobility Models
      3. 3.3 A Taxonomy of Existing Mobility Models
      4. 3.4 Mobility Models and Real-World Traces: The CRAWDAD Resource
      5. 3.5 Basic Definitions
      6. References
  12. Part Two: "General-Purpose" Mobility Models
    1. Chapter 4: Random Walk Models
      1. 4.1 Discrete Random Walks
      2. 4.2 Continuous Random Walks
      3. 4.3 Other Random Walk Models
      4. 4.4 Theoretical Properties of Random Walk Models
      5. References
    2. Chapter 5: The Random Waypoint Model
      1. 5.1 The RWP Model
      2. 5.2 The Node Spatial Distribution of the RWP Model
      3. 5.3 The Average Nodal Speed of the RWP Model
      4. 5.4 Variants of the RWP Model
      5. References
    3. Chapter 6: Group Mobility and Other Synthetic Mobility Models
      1. 6.1 The RPGM Model
      2. 6.2 Other Synthetic Mobility Models
      3. References
    4. Chapter 7: Random Trip Models
      1. 7.1 The Class of Random Trip Models
      2. 7.2 Stationarity of Random Trip Models
      3. 7.3 Examples of Random Trip Models
      4. References
  13. Part Three: Mobility Models for WLAN and Mesh Networks
    1. Chapter 8: WLAN and Mesh Networks
      1. 8.1 WLAN and Mesh Networks: State of the Art
      2. 8.2 WLAN and Mesh Networks: User Scenarios
      3. 8.3 WLAN and Mesh Networks: Perspectives
      4. 8.4 Further Reading
      5. References
    2. Chapter 9: Real-World WLAN Mobility
      1. 9.1 Real-World WLAN Traces
      2. 9.2 Features of WLAN Mobility
      3. References
    3. Chapter 10: WLAN Mobility Models
      1. 10.1 The LH Mobility Model
      2. 10.2 The KKK Mobility Model
      3. 10.3 Final Considerations and Further Reading
      4. References
  14. Part Four: Mobility Models for Vehicular Networks
    1. Chapter 11: Vehicular Networks
      1. 11.1 Vehicular Networks: State of the Art
      2. 11.2 Vehicular Networks: User Scenarios
      3. 11.3 Vehicular Networks: Perspectives
      4. 11.4 Further Reading
      5. References
    2. Chapter 12: Vehicular Networks: Macroscopic and Microscopic Mobility Models
      1. 12.1 Vehicular Mobility Models: The Macroscopic View
      2. 12.2 Vehicular Mobility Models: The Microscopic View
      3. 12.3 Further Reading
      4. References
    3. Chapter 13: Microscopic Vehicular Mobility Models
      1. 13.1 Simple Microscopic Mobility Models
      2. 13.2 The SUMO Mobility Model
      3. 13.3 Integrating Vehicular Mobility and Wireless Network Simulation
      4. References
  15. Part Five: Mobility Models for Wireless Sensor Networks
    1. Chapter 14: Wireless Sensor Networks
      1. 14.1 Wireless Sensor Networks: State of the Art
      2. 14.2 Wireless Sensor Networks: User Scenarios
      3. 14.3 WSNs: Perspectives
      4. 14.4 Further Reading
      5. References
    2. Chapter 15: Wireless Sensor Networks: Passive Mobility Models
      1. 15.1 Passive Mobility in WSNs
      2. 15.2 Mobility Models for Wildlife Tracking Applications
      3. 15.3 Modeling Movement Caused by External Forces
      4. References
    3. Chapter 16: Wireless Sensor Networks: Active Mobility Models
      1. 16.1 Active Mobility of Sensor Nodes
      2. 16.2 Active Mobility of Sink Nodes
      3. References
  16. Part Six: Mobility Models for Opportunistic Networks
    1. Chapter 17: Opportunistic Networks
      1. 17.1 Opportunistic Networks: State of the Art
      2. 17.2 Opportunistic Networks: User Scenarios
      3. 17.3 Opportunistic Networks: Perspectives
      4. 17.4 Further Reading
      5. References
    2. Chapter 18: Routing in Opportunistic Networks
      1. 18.1 Mobility-Assisted Routing in Opportunistic Networks
      2. 18.2 Opportunistic Network Mobility Metrics
      3. References
    3. Chapter 19: Mobile Social Network Analysis
      1. 19.1 The Social Network Graph
      2. 19.2 Centrality and Clustering Metrics
      3. 19.3 Characterizations of Human Mobility
      4. 19.4 Further Reading
      5. References
    4. Chapter 20: Social-Based Mobility Models
      1. 20.1 The Weighted Random Waypoint Mobility Model
      2. 20.2 The Time-Variant Community Mobility Model
      3. 20.3 The Community-Based Mobility Model
      4. 20.4 The SWIM Mobility Model
      5. 20.5 The Self-Similar Least Action Walk Model
      6. 20.6 The Home-MEG Model
      7. 20.7 Further Reading
      8. References
  17. Part Seven: Case Studies
    1. Chapter 21: Random Waypoint Model and Wireless Network Simulation
      1. 21.1 RWP Model and Simulation Accuracy
      2. 21.2 Removing the Border Effect
      3. 21.3 Removing Speed Decay
      4. 21.4 The RWP Model and “Perfect Simulation”
      5. References
    2. Chapter 22: Mobility Modeling and Opportunistic Network Performance Analysis
      1. 22.1 Unicast in Opportunistic Networks
      2. 22.2 Broadcast in Opportunistic Networks
      3. References
  18. Appendix A: Elements of Probability Theory
    1. A.1 Basic Notions of Probability Theory
    2. A.2 Probability Distributions
    3. A.3 Markov Chains
    4. References
  19. Appendix B: Elements of Graph Theory, Asymptotic Notation, and Miscellaneous Notions
    1. B.1 Asymptotic Notation
    2. B.2 Elements of Graph Theory
    3. B.3 Miscellaneous Notions
    4. References
  20. Index