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Mobile Robots for Dynamic Environments

Book Description

For several decades now, mobile robots have been integral to the development of new robotic systems for new applications, even in nontechnical areas. Mobile robots have already been developed for such uses as industrial automation, medical care, space exploration, demining operations, surveillance, entertainment, museum guides and many other industrial and non-industrial applications. In some cases these products are readily available on the market. A considerable amount of literature is also available; not all of which pertains to technical issues, as listed in the chapters of this book and its companion. Readers will enjoy this book and its companion and will utilize the knowledge gained with satisfaction and will be assisted by its content in their interdisciplinary work for engineering developments of mobile robots, in both old and new applications. This book and its companion can be used as a graduate level course book or a guide book for the practicing engineer who is working on a specific problem which is described in one of the chapters. The companion volume for this book, Designs and Prototypes of Mobile Robots, is also available from Momentum Press.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. Halftitle
  3. Title
  4. Contributing Authors
  5. Contents
  6. Preface
  7. 1. Underwater robots: a fascinating challenge
    1. 1.1 Introduction
    2. 1.2 Biomorfic fin propulsion
    3. 1.3 Biomorfic fin actuation
    4. 1.4 Biomorfic integrated fin-actuator systems: a case study
    5. 1.5 Conclusion
    6. 1.6 References
  8. 2. A novel Lighter Than Air Vehicle – Flying Octopus
    1. 2.1 Introduction
    2. 2.2 The design of Flying Octopus – a bio-inspired design
      1. 2.2.1 Design considerations
      2. 2.2.2 The design
      3. 2.2.3 The wire-driven flapping wing
    3. 2.3 Modeling and simulation
      1. 2.3.1 Wing kinematics
      2. 2.3.2 Propulsion model
      3. 2.3.3 Propulsion simulation
    4. 2.4 Motion control
      1. 2.4.1 Wing flapping motion
      2. 2.4.2 Flying Octopus motion control
    5. 2.5 Prototype and experiment testing
      1. 2.5.1 Flying Octopus prototype
      2. 2.5.2 Indoor experiments
    6. 2.6 Conclusions
    7. 2.7 References
  9. 3. Visual attitude estimation and stabilization of flying robots
    1. 3.1 Unmanned Aerial Vehicles
    2. 3.2 Attitude estimation with vision
    3. 3.3 Quadrotor UAV modeling and control
    4. 3.4 Robot design and manufacturing
    5. 3.5 Experiments
    6. 3.6 Closure
    7. 3.7 Acknowledgment
    8. 3.8 References
  10. 4. Robot swarms: dynamics and control
    1. 4.1 Introduction
    2. 4.2 Agent dynamics
      1. 4.2.1 Fully actuated agent model
      2. 4.2.2 Non-holonomic agent dynamics
      3. 4.2.3 Simplified or high-level agent models
    3. 4.3 Problem definitions
      1. 4.3.1 Aggregation and social foraging
      2. 4.3.2 Formal control and swarm tracking
      3. 4.3.3 Source seeking
    4. 4.4 Control design approaches
      1. 4.4.1 Artificial potential functions
      2. 4.4.2 Neighborhood topologies
      3. 4.4.3 Gradient-based, lyapunov, and sliding mode methods
      4. 4.4.4 Adaptive control approaches
      5. 4.4.5 Other nonlinear methods
    5. 4.5 Swarm robotic applications
      1. 4.5.1 Static coverage
      2. 4.5.2 Dynamic coverage
      3. 4.5.3 Cooperative target localization and tracking
    6. 4.6 Concluding remarks
    7. 4.7 References
  11. 5. Mobile robots for earth exploration: applications, technologies and image processing techniques for navigation
    1. 5.1 Introduction
    2. 5.2 Applications of robots for earth explorations
      1. 5.2.1 Volcanic explorations
      2. 5.2.2 Meteorite search
      3. 5.2.3 Search and rescue
      4. 5.2.4 Humanitarian demining
      5. 5.2.5 Underground explorations
      6. 5.3 Related technologies
      7. 5.3.1 Sun synchronous robots
      8. 5.3.2 Traversability analysis
      9. 5.3.3 Localization and map building
      10. 5.3.4 Traction control
    3. 5.4 Current challenges
    4. 5.5 A road detection and obstacle avoidance method of using a stereo camera for autonomous navigation
      1. 5.5.1 Related works and overview
      2. 5.5.2 Drivable surface detection outline
      3. 5.5.3 Drivable surface detection setup
      4. 5.5.4 Obstacle detection
      5. 5.5.5 Control of the robotic platform
      6. 5.5.6 Final considerations
    5. 5.6 Conclusions and future work
    6. 5.7 References
  12. Adpage
  13. Backcover