Cover by Brian Fling

Stay ahead with the world's most comprehensive technology and business learning platform.

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required

O'Reilly logo

Strategy #2: Progressive Enhancement

In Chapter 11, I talked about the concept of progressive enhancement, or the technique of using web techniques in a layered fashion to allow anyone with any web browser to access your content, regardless of the browser’s capabilities. This is actually our second multiserving strategy.

Though progressive enhancement is normally thought of as a development strategy, it can also be used as an adaptation strategy as well, going through each of the three steps of multiserving. Similar to “doing nothing,” this approach assumes that the browser will be smart enough to detect, adapt, and deliver the right experience, but in this strategy we design a site to have several fallback points, supporting a larger number of devices and not requiring support of media queries.

For example, take Figure 13-3, where we can see our presentations layered on one another. At the bottommost level, we have a rich CSS3-based experience for our Class A browsers, including support for media queries. Above it, we have good CSS2 support, for Class B browsers, and so on, until we get to the top level, or our last fallback position of no styling whatsoever, for our Class F browsers. In this case, as long as our markup is semantically coded, it should still be usable on any device that can render HTML.

Using a progressive enhancement technique to establish several fallbacks to our presentation

Figure 13-3. Using a progressive enhancement technique to establish several fallbacks ...

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, interactive tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required