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Mobile Design and Development

Cover of Mobile Design and Development by Brian Fling Published by O'Reilly Media, Inc.
  1. Mobile Design and Development
    1. SPECIAL OFFER: Upgrade this ebook with O’Reilly
    2. Preface
      1. Who This Book Is For
      2. How This Book Is Organized
      3. Conventions Used in This Book
      4. Using Code Examples
      5. How to Contact Us
      6. Safari® Books Online
      7. Acknowledgments
    3. 1. A Brief History of Mobile
      1. In the Beginning
      2. The Evolution of Devices
    4. 2. The Mobile Ecosystem
      1. Operators
      2. Networks
      3. Devices
      4. Platforms
      5. Operating Systems
      6. Application Frameworks
      7. Applications
      8. Services
    5. 3. Why Mobile?
      1. Size and Scope of the Mobile Market
      2. The Addressable Mobile Market
      3. Mobile As a Medium
      4. The Eighth Mass Medium: What’s Next?
      5. Ubiquity Starts with the Mobile Web
    6. 4. Designing for Context
      1. Thinking in Context
      2. Taking the Next Steps
    7. 5. Developing a Mobile Strategy
      1. New Rules
      2. Summary
    8. 6. Types of Mobile Applications
      1. Mobile Application Medium Types
    9. 7. Mobile Information Architecture
      1. What Is Information Architecture?
      2. Mobile Information Architecture
      3. The Design Myth
    10. 8. Mobile Design
      1. Interpreting Design
      2. The Mobile Design Tent-Pole
      3. Designing for the Best Possible Experience
      4. The Elements of Mobile Design
      5. Mobile Design Tools
      6. Designing for the Right Device
      7. Designing for Different Screen Sizes
    11. 9. Mobile Web Apps Versus Native Applications
      1. The Ubiquity Principle
      2. When to Make a Native Application
      3. When to Make a Mobile Web Application
    12. 10. Mobile 2.0
      1. What Is Mobile 2.0?
    13. 11. Mobile Web Development
      1. Web Standards
      2. Designing for Multiple Mobile Browsers
      3. Device Plans
      4. Markup
      5. CSS: Cascading Style Sheets
      6. JavaScript
    14. 12. iPhone Web Apps
      1. Why WebKit?
      2. What Makes It a Mobile Web App?
      3. Markup
      4. CSS
      5. JavaScript
      6. Creating a Mobile Web App
      7. Web Apps As Native Apps
      8. PhoneGap
      9. Tools and Libraries
    15. 13. Adapting to Devices
      1. Why Is Adaptation a “Necessity”?
      2. Strategy #1: Do Nothing
      3. Strategy #2: Progressive Enhancement
      4. Strategy #3: Device Targeting
      5. Strategy #4: Full Adaptation
      6. What Domain Do I Use?
      7. Taking the Next Step
    16. 14. Making Money in Mobile
      1. Working with Operators
      2. Working with an App Store
      3. Add Advertising
      4. Invent a New Model
    17. 15. Supporting Devices
      1. Having a Device Plan
      2. Device Testing
      3. Desktop Testing
      4. Usability Testing
    18. 16. The Future of Mobile
      1. The Opportunity for Change
    19. Index
    20. About the Author
    21. Colophon
    22. SPECIAL OFFER: Upgrade this ebook with O’Reilly


WebKit is about as modern a browser as it gets, supporting nearly every approved web standard we have; the only other browser engine that comes close is the Trident browsing engine used in many of Opera’s browsers. The challenge with today’s browsers is for the first time, desktop browser makers are ahead of the W3C, implementing standards that are being discussed by the W3C working groups but not yet finalized. My hope would be that by the time you read this book, the specifications for HTML5 or XHTML2 (as well as CSS3) will have been finalized, but I’m not going to hold my breath. The debate and discussion of these new standards has been going on for ages, and innovation simply can’t wait for the final specification to be handed down. This means that browser makers are moving forward implementing what and how they think is the best way to go about it, then reporting their findings back to the working groups—WebKit included.


When the HTML standard was published in 1990, it was designed for formatting and laying out elements on the screen contextually. For the most part, it was logical, but there were some exceptions that made parsing it quirky. For instance, the open line-break tag <br> did not need to be closed.

A few years later, the similar XML syntax standard for marking up data semantically came out. Because the structure and content of the data is unknown, XML is much stricter about its structure.

Though the two formats look syntactically similar, they have different ...

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