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Mobile Design and Development

Cover of Mobile Design and Development by Brian Fling Published by O'Reilly Media, Inc.
  1. Mobile Design and Development
    1. SPECIAL OFFER: Upgrade this ebook with O’Reilly
    2. Preface
      1. Who This Book Is For
      2. How This Book Is Organized
      3. Conventions Used in This Book
      4. Using Code Examples
      5. How to Contact Us
      6. Safari® Books Online
      7. Acknowledgments
    3. 1. A Brief History of Mobile
      1. In the Beginning
      2. The Evolution of Devices
    4. 2. The Mobile Ecosystem
      1. Operators
      2. Networks
      3. Devices
      4. Platforms
      5. Operating Systems
      6. Application Frameworks
      7. Applications
      8. Services
    5. 3. Why Mobile?
      1. Size and Scope of the Mobile Market
      2. The Addressable Mobile Market
      3. Mobile As a Medium
      4. The Eighth Mass Medium: What’s Next?
      5. Ubiquity Starts with the Mobile Web
    6. 4. Designing for Context
      1. Thinking in Context
      2. Taking the Next Steps
    7. 5. Developing a Mobile Strategy
      1. New Rules
      2. Summary
    8. 6. Types of Mobile Applications
      1. Mobile Application Medium Types
    9. 7. Mobile Information Architecture
      1. What Is Information Architecture?
      2. Mobile Information Architecture
      3. The Design Myth
    10. 8. Mobile Design
      1. Interpreting Design
      2. The Mobile Design Tent-Pole
      3. Designing for the Best Possible Experience
      4. The Elements of Mobile Design
      5. Mobile Design Tools
      6. Designing for the Right Device
      7. Designing for Different Screen Sizes
    11. 9. Mobile Web Apps Versus Native Applications
      1. The Ubiquity Principle
      2. When to Make a Native Application
      3. When to Make a Mobile Web Application
    12. 10. Mobile 2.0
      1. What Is Mobile 2.0?
    13. 11. Mobile Web Development
      1. Web Standards
      2. Designing for Multiple Mobile Browsers
      3. Device Plans
      4. Markup
      5. CSS: Cascading Style Sheets
      6. JavaScript
    14. 12. iPhone Web Apps
      1. Why WebKit?
      2. What Makes It a Mobile Web App?
      3. Markup
      4. CSS
      5. JavaScript
      6. Creating a Mobile Web App
      7. Web Apps As Native Apps
      8. PhoneGap
      9. Tools and Libraries
    15. 13. Adapting to Devices
      1. Why Is Adaptation a “Necessity”?
      2. Strategy #1: Do Nothing
      3. Strategy #2: Progressive Enhancement
      4. Strategy #3: Device Targeting
      5. Strategy #4: Full Adaptation
      6. What Domain Do I Use?
      7. Taking the Next Step
    16. 14. Making Money in Mobile
      1. Working with Operators
      2. Working with an App Store
      3. Add Advertising
      4. Invent a New Model
    17. 15. Supporting Devices
      1. Having a Device Plan
      2. Device Testing
      3. Desktop Testing
      4. Usability Testing
    18. 16. The Future of Mobile
      1. The Opportunity for Change
    19. Index
    20. About the Author
    21. Colophon
    22. SPECIAL OFFER: Upgrade this ebook with O’Reilly
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Ubiquity Starts with the Mobile Web

We have endured years of bold and usually unfulfilled claims that come from the tech sector. We’ve been promised that the Web will make our lives easier, but aren’t we seeing the opposite reaction? Our lives are becoming so infused with information that it becomes overwhelming and even stressful just to keep up—an increasing problem called information overload.

The problem: the Web of today is wide, but not deep. Although we have access to enormous amounts of information, the majority of it isn’t meaningful. It lacks depth and value for our lives. For example, according to an October 2008 Nielson report, the average person in the United States looks at 76 web pages per day, spending an average of 55 seconds per page. The short duration suggests short information-gathering tasks, idle browsing, or a more severe problem with the Web: distrust.

Web content expert Gerry McGovern describes it this way:

People are more skeptical about content online than offline. People basically view the Internet as a dumping ground for content. There’s some great stuff, sure. However, it is vastly outweighed by badly written, out-of-date, inaccurate, and sometimes deliberately misleading content.

With the mobile web, however, we see a quite different picture. We still see short, simple tasks that one might expect given the mobility of the user, but with a far higher number of page views per visit, each with longer session times. People don’t just bounce around from site ...

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