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Migrating to IPv6: A Practical Guide to Implementing IPv6 in Mobile and Fixed Networks by Marc Blanchet

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Steps

Instructions are given for FreeBSD 5.2, Linux RedHat 8 and Windows XP in this chapter. Note the following:

  • An IPv6 address has 128 bits and is written in hexadecimal notation with ‘:’ as separator between the 8 fields of 16 bits each.
  • The IPv6 address ‘::1’ is the equivalent of the IPv4 127.0.0.1 loopback address.
  • IPv6 addresses starting with ‘fe80::’ are link-local addresses automatically assigned to all IPv6-enabled interfaces. Link-local addresses provide ready to use addresses for subnet scope communications. The last 4 fields of the address contains a slightly modified version of the link-layer (MAC) address of the interface.
  • The ‘subnet mask’ in IPv6 is fixed to /64. For every IPv6 address configured on physical interfaces such as Ethernet, ‘/64’ is appended at the end of the address to show the subnet mask.

Enabling IPv6 on N2 and N3

The first step is to enable IPv6 on the operating system of N2 and N3 and verify it is working. The following sub-sections show how to do this for each operating system.

FreeBSD

In FreeBSD, IPv6 is enabled by setting the ipv6_enable variable to yes in the /etc/rc.conf configuration file.

# cat /etc/rc.conf
ipv6_enable=yes

While not necessary, it is simpler for this exercise to reboot FreeBSD after enabling IPv6.

Pinging to the loopback (::1) is a good way to see that basic IPv6 is working.

% ping6 ::1

Reply packets should now be seen on the screen.

To verify the IPv6 addresses on an interface, use ifconfig <interface_name>.

% ifconfig ...

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