O'Reilly logo

Microsoft SQL Server 2012 Internals by Bob Beauchemin Kalen Delaney Conor Cunningham, Jonathan Kehayias, Benjamin Nevarez, and Paul S. Randal

Stay ahead with the world's most comprehensive technology and business learning platform.

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required

SQL Server B-tree indexes

In SQL Server, most indexes are organized using a B-tree structure (see Figure 7-1). In fact, in this chapter, any reference to any kind of index without qualifying it indicates a B-tree index. The term B-tree stands for “balanced tree,” and SQL Server uses a special kind called B+ trees (pronounced “b-plus trees”). The difference between B-trees and B+ trees isn’t really relevant for this discussion of the way SQL Server indexes are managed, so the difference will be ignored. Index structures are referred to as simply B-trees. Unlike a normal tree, B-trees are always inverted, with their root (a single page) at the top and their leaf level at the bottom. The existence of intermediate levels depends on multiple factors. ...

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, interactive tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required