O'Reilly logo

Microsoft Office® Access 2007 Inside Out by John Viescas and Jeff Conrad

Stay ahead with the world's most comprehensive technology and business learning platform.

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required

Using Linked Tables in a Desktop Database

Your first foray into the world of shared applications will most likely involve copying your completed database to a file server and instructing users to open the database from the server. That’s basically not a good idea because Access doesn’t run on the server—it runs on each user’s desktop. If you have several users sharing a database file, the copy of Access running on each user computer has to load all your "code" definitions—the queries, forms, reports, macros, and modules—over the network. If one user applies a sort or filter to a form and then closes it, Access will try to save the changed definition in the copy on the server, and it might run into locking or corruption problems if another user ...

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, interactive tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required