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Mediatization and Sociolinguistic Change

Book Description

This volume brings together a range of approaches to the role of media in processes of sociolinguistic change. Its 17 chapters and five section commentaries examine the impact of mediatization on language use and ideologies from five complementary perspectives: media influence on linguistic structure, media engagement in interaction, change in mass and new media language, language-ideological change, and the role of media for minority languages.

Table of Contents

  1. linguae & litterae
  2. Title Page
  3. Copyright Page
  4. Table of Contents
  5. Section I: Framing the issues
    1. Mediatization and sociolinguistic change. Key concepts, research traditions, open issues
      1. 1 Introduction
      2. 2 From language change to sociolinguistic change
      3. 3 The ‘media’ in sociolinguistics
      4. 4 From media to mediation and mediatization
      5. 5 Media influence on language change: Theme I
      6. 6 Media engagement in interactional practice: Theme II
      7. 7 Change in mass-mediatized and digitally mediated language: Theme III
      8. 8 Enregisterment of change in media discourse: Theme IV
      9. 9 Mediatized spaces for minoritized languages: Theme V
      10. Acknowledgements
      11. References
    2. Mediatization. A panorama of media and communication research
      1. 1 Introduction
      2. 2 A fundamental understanding of mediatization
      3. 3 The development of mediatization research and theory
      4. 4 Combining the institutionalist and social-constructivist tradition
      5. 5 Mediatization research and sociolinguistics
      6. References
    3. Sociolinguistic change, vernacularization and broadcast British media
      1. 1 Introduction
      2. 2 Language change, social change and sociolinguistic change
      3. 3 Five dimensions of sociolinguistic change
      4. 4 Standardization as a sociolinguistic change
      5. 5 Vernacularization and destandardization
      6. 6 Vernacularization through broadcast British media: Research agenda
      7. References
  6. Section II: Media influence on language change
    1. Does mediated language influence immediate language?
      1. 1 Introduction
      2. 2 Direct influence from writing on speech in Denmark?
      3. 3 Direct influence from writing on speech in Norway?
      4. 4 Indirect influence from writing on speech in Denmark?
      5. 5 Indirect influence from writing on speech in Norway?
      6. 6 Direct influence from broadcast media on speech?
      7. 7 Indirect influence from broadcast media on speech in Denmark?
      8. 8 Indirect influence from broadcast media on speech in Norway?
      9. 9 Summary and conclusion
      10. References
    2. Media models, ‘the shelf’, and stylistic variation in East and West. Rethinking the influence of the media on language variation and change
      1. 1 Introduction
      2. 2 Language variation and change and the influence of the media
        1. 2.1 Position A: The broadcast media promote language standardization
        2. 2.2 Position B: The broadcast media do not affect systemic linguistic change
        3. 2.3 Position C: The media may be involved in some “off the shelf” changes
      3. 3 What is media influence? The view from mass communicationstudies
        1. 3.1 From “media effects” to “active audiences”
        2. 3.2 Evidence for media influence on social behavior, cognition, and individuals
        3. 3.3 Modeling media influence
      4. 4 Extrapolating models of media influence to sociolinguistics
        1. 4.1 General implications
        2. 4.2 The broadcast media as a stylistic “shelf” for language variation
      5. 5 Hearing features “on the shelf”? Phrasal pitch in Kagoshima Japanese and Tokyo Japanese media models
        1. 5.1 Accent and tone in Kagoshima Japanese
        2. 5.2 Kagoshima – sociolinguistic context
        3. 5.3 The media and phrasal pitch change in Japanese (Study 1)
        4. 5.4 The media and Prosodic Subordination in Japanese (Study 2)
      6. 6 Indexical fields and social meaning of pitch patterning in Japanese
      7. 7 Taking features “right off the shelf”? Rapid consonant change in Glasgow and “Mockney” media models
        1. 7.1 Rapid consonant diffusion in the UK and media influence
        2. 7.2 Glasgow – sociolinguistic context
        3. 7.3 Consonant change and media influence in Glasgow
        4. 7.4 Media models and community norms: From Mockney to Jockney?
        5. 7.5 Style, stance and media “influence”
      8. 8 Emerging themes on speech in the community and speech on the (media) “shelf”: Perspectives from East and West
      9. 9 Concluding remarks
      10. References
    3. The media influence on language change in Japanese sociolinguistic contexts
      1. 1 Introduction
        1. 1.1 Standard Japanese, television Japanese, and the media
        2. 1.2 Is the media impact a sociolinguistic myth in Japan?
      2. 2 Evidence from survey results: The apparent-time paradigm and the real-time paradigm
        1. 2.1 Surveys of Yoshio Mase and Yoneichi Ono
          1. 2.1.1 Accentual change surveys of Mase (1981, 1996)
          2. 2.1.2 The pitch-accent system of Japanese dialects
          3. 2.1.3 Standardization of a Tokyo type accent area, Odagiri, Nagano
          4. 2.1.4 Standardization in an accentless area, Ikawa, Shizuoka
          5. 2.1.5 Standardization of lexical accent in Sapporo, Hokkaido
        2. 2.2 Standardization in the real time paradigm: NIJL (1953, 1974, 2007)
          1. 2.2.1 The Tsuruoka survey
          2. 2.2.2 The relationship between phonological change in Tsuruoka and the media
        3. 2.3 What do these surveys tell us?
      3. 3 Similarity beyond geographical distance: De-standardization in lexical accent and sentential pitch trajectory
        1. 3.1 Emergence of a de-standardized version of lexical accent
        2. 3.2 Sentential pitch levelling as a supra-local innovation and its social meanings
      4. 4 Stylized performance based on the media models
      5. 5 Discussion and conclusion
      6. References
    4. Commentary: Television and language use. What do we mean by influence and how do we detect it?
      1. 1 Why focus on TV?
      2. 2 What is affected by TV?
      3. 3 What do we mean by influence and how do we detect it?
      4. References
  7. Section III: Media engagement in interactional practice
    1. ‘Girlpower or girl (in) trouble?’ Identities and discourses in the (new) media engagements of adolescents’ school-based interaction
      1. 1 Introduction
      2. 2 Data and methods
        1. 2.1 A practice-based approach to (new) media engagements and identities
      3. 3 (New) Media engagements-in-interaction
        1. 3.1 A survey
        2. 3.2 Ways of telling media engagements
        3. 3.3 Small stories of new media engagements: Routines and transgressions
        4. 3.4 Ways of telling and sites as windows into the tellers of media engagements
          1. 3.4.1 Situated identities
          2. 3.4.2 Reflections
          3. 3.4.3 Positionings of girlpower and girl (in) trouble
      4. 4 Concluding remarks
      5. References
    2. Multilingualism, multimodality and media engagement in classroom talk and action
      1. 1 Introduction
      2. 2 Multilingualism, multimodality and media engagement
      3. 3 Methodology
      4. 4 The context of the study: Turkish-speaking communities and their schools in London
      5. 5 Results
        1. 5.1 Baran’s linguistic repertoire and everyday media engagement
        2. 5.2 Teaching and learning in Turkish school
        3. 5.3 “I’m always on mobile innit”: Baran’s media engagement in Turkish class
        4. 5.4 “Annemize”: Singing for Mother’s Day
      6. 6 Discussion and conclusion
      7. References
    3. Commentary: ‘Agents’ or ‘participation’. Sociolinguistic frameworks for the study of media engagement
      1. References
  8. Section IV: Change in mass-mediatized and digitally mediated language
    1. Semiotic economy, growth of mass media discourse, and change of written language through multimodal techniques. - The case of newspapers (printed and online) and web services
      1. 1 Introduction: What is at issue?
      2. 2 Communication technology and language history
      3. 3 Texts in printed newspapers
      4. 4 Texts in online newspapers
      5. 5 Texts on the World Wide Web
      6. 6 Summary and outlook
      7. References
    2. Genre profiles and genre change. The case of TV news
      1. 1 Introduction
      2. 2 Genre change and social change
      3. 3 Genre profiles
      4. 4 Genre profiles in TV news shows
      5. 5 Conclusion
      6. References
    3. Tweets in the news. Legitimizing medium, standardizing form
      1. 1 Introduction
      2. 2 Background
        1. 2.1 Twitter in the news media
        2. 2.2 Vernacularity and authenticity in Twitter quotations
      3. 3 Research Questions
      4. 4 Analyses and Discussion
        1. 4.1 Changes in quantity: Trajectory of reported tweets from 2006–2011
        2. 4.2 Changes in context: Recontextualizing reported tweets
        3. 4.3 Changes in character: The linguistic and orthographic profile of reported tweets
      5. 5 Conclusions
      6. References
    4. Commentary: Mediality, mediatization and sociolinguistic change
      1. 1 ‘Media’ – ‘mediality’ – ‘mediatization’
      2. 2 Cui bono?
      3. References
  9. Section V: Enregisterment of change in media discourse
    1. Revising the “journalist’s bible”. How news practitioners respond to language and social change
      1. 1 Introduction
        1. 1.1 The data
      2. 2 Locating language in the media
      3. 2.1 Journalists and language
      4. 2.2 Sociolinguistics and journalism
      5. 2.3 The complaint tradition and news practice
      6. 3 The AP Stylebook as journalistic tool and sociolinguistic resource
        1. 3.1 Purpose and position
        2. 3.2 Copy editors and the “journalist’s bible”
      7. 4 Responding to language change
        1. 4.1 Ask the Editor and usage rationales
        2. 4.2 Social justice issues
      8. 5 Behind the metatalk: Conclusions
      9. References
    2. The media on media-induced language change
      1. 1 Introduction
      2. 2 The media’s conception of media-induced language change
        1. 2.1 The corpus
        2. 2.2 Examples
          1. 2.2.1 “The language of the media”
          2. 2.2.2 Guardians and their standards
          3. 2.2.3 New media, new threats
        3. 2.3 A conceptual topology
      3. 3 Conclusions and discussion
      4. References
    3. The objectification of ‘Jafaican’. The discoursal embedding of Multicultural London English in the British media
      1. 1 Introduction: Mediatization of new urban youth varieties
      2. 2 The London multiethnolect: what it is and what people think about it
      3. 3 London’s multiethnolect: A short history
      4. 4 Entries referring to the multiethnolect in theUrban Dictionary
      5. 5 The multiethnolect in the newspapers: A quantitative analysis of mentions
      6. 6 The multiethnolect in the newspapers: evolving discourses and metaphors
        1. 6.1 Jafaican as agent: The cuckoo in the nest, pushing out the natives
        2. 6.2 Jafaican as a problem (1): Inappropriate in formal contexts
        3. 6.3 Jafaican as natural linguistic development
        4. 6.4 The enregisterment of Jafaican by the media: Are you ‘in the know’?
        5. 6.5 Jafaican as ‘foreign’, but not (yet) a threat
        6. 6.6 Jafaican as a problem (2): A cultural threat to gender equality
        7. 6.7 Jafaican as norm: The British music industry
        8. 6.8 Cockney as a museum piece
        9. 6.9 Enregisterment – again
        10. 6.10 Jafaican as a problem (3): Bad language, challenging dress style and bad behaviour
        11. 6.11 Jafaican as a problem (3): Hindering educational achievement and social mobility
        12. 6.12 ‘Jamaican’ (or Jamaican slang) as fashion
      7. 7 Conclusion
      8. References
    4. Commentary: Sociolinguists and the news media
      1. Refererences
  10. Section VI: Mediatized spaces for minoritized languages
    1. Súil Eile. Media, sociolinguistic change and the Irish Language
      1. 1 Introduction
      2. 2 Media, minority language LPP and sociolinguistic change
      3. 3 The Irish language context
      4. 4 Irish language mobility in media domains
        1. 4.1 TG4
          1. 4.1.1 TG4 and Language ideology
          2. 4.1.2 TG4 and language practices
        2. 4.2 Performative genres
          1. 4.2.1 Des Bishop as an agent of sociolinguistic change
      5. 5 Discussion
      6. References
    2. Sites of struggle and possibility in cyberspace. - Wikipedia and Facebook in Africa
      1. 1 Introduction – empowerment through technology?
      2. 2 Who has access to digital technology? Who can speak and act in cyberspace?
      3. 3 Measuring the multilingual internet – where are we now?
      4. 4 Wikipedia – “one of online multilingualism’s greatest successes”?
        1. 4.1 The isiXhosa Wikipedia
        2. 4.2 Wikipedia’s African successes – Malagasy, Yorùbá, Kiswahili and Afrikaans
      5. 5 Facebook – Indlu ka Xhosa (‘the house of Xhosa’)?
      6. 6 Conclusion
      7. References
    3. Circulation of indigenous Sámi resources across media spaces. - A rhizomatic discourse approach
      1. 1 Sociolinguistic transitions in Sámiland
      2. 2 A rhizomatic discourse approach
      3. 3 Circulation across Sámi media spaces
        1. 3.1 Space 1: Superfixed multilingual space: tv-Ođđasat
        2. 3.2 Space 2: Strategically hybrid Sámi space: television comedy
      4. 4 Discussion: Circulation across modern and postmodern Sámi media spaces
      5. References
    4. Commentary: Mediatized spaces for minoritized languages. Challenges and opportunities
      1. References
  11. Notes on contributors
  12. Index