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Mathematics and Physics for Programmers, Second Edition by Danny Kodicek, John Patrick Flynt

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Chapter 17. 3-D Geometry

Overview

Thus far, most of the discussion in this book has involved 2-D problems. While adding a third dimension is mostly just a matter of adding another number, doing so has many implications. For one thing, since your computer screen has two dimensions, not three, when you enter the third dimension, you must find some way to flatten the extra dimension back to a 2-D image. Further, objects in 3-D have sides that are visible and that occlude other sides. To understand how to work with such problems, in this chapter you’ll start by looking at how 3-D space can be represented.

3-D Vectors

By now you are used to representing a point in 2-D space in terms of a pair of ...

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