You are previewing Match: A Systematic, Sane Process for Hiring the Right Person Every Time.

Match: A Systematic, Sane Process for Hiring the Right Person Every Time

  1. Copyright
  2. The Awakening
    1. Creating a Process
  3. Acknowledgments
    1. MATCH
  4. Introduction
    1. MATCH
    2. Systematic/Sane?
    3. How to Use This Book
    4. Frequently Asked Questions
      1. What kind of success can I expect from using the MATCH Process?
      2. Is MATCH right for my organization?
      3. Do I have to implement all the steps of MATCH?
      4. Does MATCH work across all industries?
      5. Why should I bother with MATCH?
  5. I. MATCH: The Foundation
    1. 1. Assume the Proper Mind-Set
    2. 2. Begin with the Mission
      1. 2.1. The Purpose of the Mission Statement from a Hiring Perspective
      2. 2.2. Thoughts on the Mission Statement Itself
      3. 2.3. Ownership of Mission
      4. 2.4. A Portion of the Ritz-Carlton Mission Statement
      5. 2.5. Avoid the Dilbert Web Site Mission Statement
    3. 3. Assemble the Hiring Team
      1. 3.1. Who Leads the Charge?
    4. 4. Clarify the Corporate Culture
      1. 4.1. Your Hiring Team and the Scorecard
  6. IIA. MATCH: The Process: Phase I—Preparing the Recruiting Plan
    1. 5. Create the Organizational Chart: Step 1
      1. 5.1. The Deeper Function of an Org Chart
    2. 6. Compile a Job Overview: Step 2
      1. 6.1. The Benefits of a Good Job Overview
      2. 6.2. The Skills Required
    3. 7. Create the Competency Profile: Step 3
      1. 7.1. The Process
      2. 7.2. Competency Profile
      3. 7.3. Behavioral Interviewing
      4. 7.4. Common Questions
    4. 8. Structure the Recruiting Plan: Step 4
      1. 8.1. Final Check before Launch of Recruiting Plan
      2. 8.2. Common Recruiting Methods
      3. 8.3. Never Set Hiring Deadlines
      4. 8.4. Thoughts on Recruiting Firms
  7. IIB. MATCH: The Process: Phase II—Implementing the Recruiting Plan
    1. 9. Conduct the Phone Screen: Step 5
      1. 9.1. Phone Screen
      2. 9.2. Developing and Using a Telephone Screening Form
      3. 9.3. The Dos and Don'ts of Interviewing
      4. 9.4. Tips on the Phone Screen
      5. 9.5. Closing and Clarification
      6. 9.6. Time-Saving Tips for Phone Screens
      7. 9.7. Using the Proper Equipment
      8. 9.8. Thoughts on Recruiting Firms and the Screening Process
    2. 10. Conduct the Face-to-Face Interview: Step 6
      1. 10.1. Overview
      2. 10.2. The Interview Format and Your Hiring Team
      3. 10.3. The Four Parts of the Interview Process
      4. 10.4. A Final Word: Where to Interview?
    3. 11. Check References: Step 7
      1. 11.1. Prior to the Reference Call
      2. 11.2. How to Get a Reference to Return Your Call Every Time
      3. 11.3. Using the Data Collected in the Reference Calls
      4. 11.4. The Value of References during the Interview Process
    4. 12. Perform Background Checks: Step 8
  8. III. MATCH: The Process: Phase III—Executing the Hire
    1. 13. Make the Decision: Step 9
      1. 13.1. Responsibilities
      2. 13.2. The Process
    2. 14. Extend the Offer: Step 10
      1. 14.1. Knowing What to Offer
      2. 14.2. Offer and Counteroffer
      3. 14.3. You're Still Only 90 Percent There
    3. 15. Receive Acceptance: Step 11
      1. 15.1. A Glimpse into the Other Side
      2. 15.2. What You Can Do
    4. 16. Perform Onboarding: Step 12
      1. 16.1. The Process
      2. 16.2. Effective Onboarding Programs
      3. 16.3. Onboarding's Increased Importance
      4. 16.4. Onboarding Checklist Sample 1
  9. IV. MATCH: The Process: Phase IV—Following Up
    1. 17. Retain the Employee: Step 13
      1. 17.1. First, Understand Your Own Framework
      2. 17.2. The Retention Areas
      3. 17.3. Mentoring
      4. 17.4. Retention Strategies
    2. 18. Test the Return on Investment: Step 14
      1. 18.1. Calculating and Avoiding the Cost of a Mishire
      2. 18.2. Analyzing Increased Revenue/Efficiency
      3. 18.3. Revenue per Employee (RPE)
      4. 18.4. Web Site Developer
      5. 18.5. Database Manager
      6. 18.6. Office Manager
      7. 18.7. Cultural Impact
      8. 18.8. The Best Candidate Available for the Money
      9. 18.9. Measuring ROI
    3. 19. Make the Process Stick: Step 15
      1. 19.1. Making the Right Process Stick
      2. 19.2. The Feedback Loop
      3. 19.3. A Suggested Format Is the Debrief Session
    4. 20. Foster a Culture of Effective Hiring: Step 16
      1. 20.1. Foster a Culture of Effective Hiring
      2. 20.2. Creating a Culture of Continuous Improvement in the Area of Hiring
      3. 20.3. The Mission Still Drives the Hire
  10. Conclusion
    1. So What Does MATCH Stand For?
    2. A View from Inside a Recruiting Firm
    3. A Lesson Learned
  11. I. A Word about Contractors
    1. A.1. Try Before You Buy
    2. A.2. The Benefits
    3. A.3. Managing Contractors
  12. II. Sample Documents for Hiring a Controller
    1. B.1. Sample Job Description
      1. B.1.1. Organizational Chart
    2. B.2. Sample Interview Questions
      1. B.2.1. Additional Questions
    3. B.3. Sample Reference Questions
      1. B.3.1. Additional Questions
  13. III. The Cost of a Mishire: The Story of the Bad Controller
    1. C.1. You Know Jack
      1. C.1.1. Story: The Bad Controller
  14. IV. Onboarding Checklist
  15. About the Author
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Chapter 15. Receive Acceptance: Step 11

It is not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change.

Charles Darwin

Change is difficult—for everyone. Psychologists rank "starting a new job" third, just below "death of a loved one" and "divorce" on the stress continuum. So even though you and the hiring team have agreed on a candidate, remember that the deal still faces major obstacles, and if you don't manage the emotional "care and feeding" of your candidate during the transition to your company, you could easily lose them.

A Glimpse into the Other Side

We'll talk about what you can do in a moment, but let me first give you insight into what happens at the candidate's current company, once they turn in their notice. (Or maybe you already know, because you do this in your own company!)

  1. Upon telling their supervisor that they are resigning to go to work for your company, that supervisor says something like, "Let's keep this news between you and me until we can make a formal announcement."

    Note

    Sticky Notes:

    • Accept that changing jobs is extremely stressful for your candidate.

    • Plan for the possibility of a counteroffer.

    • Keep in frequent touch with small pieces of information.

  2. The president or the CEO personally calls to invite the resigning employee out to dinner.

  3. At dinner, the bigwig praises the resigning employee and mentions that he or she was being seriously considered for a raise and promotion. The bigwig explains that it is really ...

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