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Mastering Revit® Architecture 2010

Book Description

As Autodesk's fastest-growing software package, Revit Architecture offers a new version that will require Revit users of all areas of expertise—architects, project managers, designers, contractors, and building owners—to learn new skills. As the only complete tutorial and reference for the newest version of Revit software, this book provides you with a hands-on look at the Revit interface, explores key modeling principles, looks at design options and features, and shows how to best present designs, and discusses proven workflows and best practices. The in-depth discussions, real-world examples, and detailed tutorials are drawn from the author’s professional experience using the program.

Table of Contents

  1. Copyright
  2. Dear Reader,
  3. Acknowledgments
  4. About the Authors
  5. Foreword
    1. Change Was Coming
    2. There Are People Who Do
    3. Iterating and Innovating in a Recession
    4. Nurturing a Young Technology
    5. Where Are We Now?
    6. What's Next?
      1. Economic Pressures
      2. Environmental Pressures
  6. Introduction
    1. Who Should Read This Book
    2. What You Will Learn
    3. The Mastering Series
  7. 1. Understanding BIM: From the Basics to Advanced Realities
    1. 1.1. Identifying the Advantages of BIM
      1. 1.1.1. A Brief History of Design and Documentation
      2. 1.1.2. Building Information Modeling
    2. 1.2. BIM and Process Change
      1. 1.2.1. Revit Encourages Creativity
      2. 1.2.2. Every Element in Revit Has Properties
      3. 1.2.3. Elements Interact with Other Elements—All the Time
      4. 1.2.4. Duplicating Views Takes Two Clicks
      5. 1.2.5. Revit Fosters Problem Solving
      6. 1.2.6. Revit Lets You Leverage Other Tools to Support Your Workflow
      7. 1.2.7. Revit Allows You to Draft
      8. 1.2.8. The Family Editor Is a Powerful Tool
      9. 1.2.9. Revit Does Away with Layers and X-References
      10. 1.2.10. BIM Is More than a Technology Approach: It's a Change in Process
      11. 1.2.11. Revit Is the Most Advanced BIM Application
      12. 1.2.12. Where Can You Go from Here?
    3. 1.3. The Bottom Line
  8. 2. Revit Fundamentals
    1. 2.1. Understanding Revit Parametric Elements
      1. 2.1.1. Model Categories
      2. 2.1.2. Annotation Categories
      3. 2.1.3. Subcategories
      4. 2.1.4. Imported Categories/Subcategories
      5. 2.1.5. Views
      6. 2.1.6. Type and Instance Parameters
      7. 2.1.7. Bidirectional Relationships
      8. 2.1.8. Constraints
      9. 2.1.9. Revit Families
        1. 2.1.9.1. System Families
        2. 2.1.9.2. Component Families
        3. 2.1.9.3. In-Place Families
      10. 2.1.10. Overriding the Representation of Elements
    2. 2.2. Working with the Revit User Interface
      1. 2.2.1. Starting Revit
      2. 2.2.2. The Start Screen
      3. 2.2.3. The User Interface
        1. 2.2.3.1. Application Frame Overview
      4. 2.2.4. The View Window
        1. 2.2.4.1. View Controls
      5. 2.2.5. SteeringWheel and View Cube
      6. 2.2.6. The Project Browser
    3. 2.3. Modifying and Personalizing the Interface
    4. 2.4. Using the Project Browser
      1. 2.4.1. Views
      2. 2.4.2. Customizing the Project Browser's Organization
      3. 2.4.3. Sheets
      4. 2.4.4. Families
      5. 2.4.5. Links
      6. 2.4.6. Groups
    5. 2.5. Navigating Views and View Properties
      1. 2.5.1. Floor Plans
        1. 2.5.1.1. View Range
        2. 2.5.1.2. Cut Plane
        3. 2.5.1.3. The Primary Range
        4. 2.5.1.4. View Depth
      2. 2.5.2. Creating a Plan View Using View Range and a Plan Region
      3. 2.5.3. Sections
        1. 2.5.3.1. Broken Section Lines
        2. 2.5.3.2. Jogged Sections
        3. 2.5.3.3. Depth of a Section
        4. 2.5.3.4. Autohiding Sections and Elevations
      4. 2.5.4. Elevations
      5. 2.5.5. 3D Views
        1. 2.5.5.1. Axonometric 3D Views
          1. 2.5.5.1.1. Orienting to Other Views
        2. 2.5.5.2. Perspective Views (Cameras)
    6. 2.6. The Bottom Line
  9. 3. Know Your Editing Tools
    1. 3.1. Selecting, Modifying, and Replacing Elements
      1. 3.1.1. Selection
        1. 3.1.1.1. Filtering Your Selection
        2. 3.1.1.2. Selecting All Instances
        3. 3.1.1.3. Using the Type Selector
        4. 3.1.1.4. Matching Properties
      2. 3.1.2. Copying and Pasting
        1. 3.1.2.1. Paste Aligned
      3. 3.1.3. Create Similar
    2. 3.2. Editing Elements Interactively
      1. 3.2.1. Moving Elements
        1. 3.2.1.1. Using Temporary Dimensions
        2. 3.2.1.2. Using the Move Tool
        3. 3.2.1.3. Nudging Elements
        4. 3.2.1.4. Moving with Nearby Elements
      2. 3.2.2. Copy
      3. 3.2.3. Rotating and Mirroring Elements
        1. 3.2.3.1. Using the Spacebar
        2. 3.2.3.2. Using the Rotate Tool
        3. 3.2.3.3. Using the Mirror Tool
      4. 3.2.4. Arraying Elements
      5. 3.2.5. Scaling Elements
      6. 3.2.6. Aligning Elements
      7. 3.2.7. Trimming Lines and Walls
      8. 3.2.8. Extending Lines and Walls
      9. 3.2.9. Splitting Lines and Walls
      10. 3.2.10. Offsetting Lines and Walls
      11. 3.2.11. Keeping Elements from Moving
        1. 3.2.11.1. Pinning Elements
        2. 3.2.11.2. Constraints
    3. 3.3. Exploring Other Editing Tools
      1. 3.3.1. Join Geometry
      2. 3.3.2. Split Face and Paint
      3. 3.3.3. Keyboard Shortcuts (Accelerators)
    4. 3.4. The Bottom Line
  10. 4. Setting Up Your Templates and Office Standards
    1. 4.1. Starting a Project with a Custom Template
      1. 4.1.1. Strategies for Making Templates
      2. 4.1.2. Settings for Graphic Consistency
      3. 4.1.3. Object Styles
      4. 4.1.4. Line Styles
      5. 4.1.5. Line Patterns
      6. 4.1.6. Creating a New Line Pattern
      7. 4.1.7. Materials
        1. 4.1.7.1. Graphics
        2. 4.1.7.2. Render Appearance
      8. 4.1.8. Fill Patterns (Hatches)
        1. 4.1.8.1. Creating a Custom Pattern Using a Pattern File
        2. 4.1.8.2. Importing a Custom Pattern
        3. 4.1.8.3. Importing PAT Files
      9. 4.1.9. Dimension Styles
        1. 4.1.9.1. Properties of Dimension Styles
      10. 4.1.10. Text
        1. 4.1.10.1. Properties of Text
    2. 4.2. Creating Custom Annotation Tags
      1. 4.2.1. View Tags
        1. 4.2.1.1. Section View Tags
          1. 4.2.1.1.1. Creating a Custom Section Tag
          2. 4.2.1.1.2. Creating a Custom Section Tag Family
          3. 4.2.1.1.3. Creating a Section Tag with a Custom Head/Tail Graphic
        2. 4.2.1.2. Callouts
          1. 4.2.1.2.1. Creating a Custom Callout Head
          2. 4.2.1.2.2. Callout Views—Type Properties
          3. 4.2.1.2.3. Creating Callout Tags
        3. 4.2.1.3. Elevation Tags
          1. 4.2.1.3.1. Elevation Tag Properties
          2. 4.2.1.3.2. Elevation View Type Properties
          3. 4.2.1.3.3. Creating an Elevation Tag
          4. 4.2.1.3.4. Assigning a Family to a View Tag
        4. 4.2.1.4. Levels
          1. 4.2.1.4.1. Level Properties
        5. 4.2.1.5. Grids
      2. 4.2.2. Customizing Element Tags
        1. 4.2.2.1. Creating a Custom Door Tag
        2. 4.2.2.2. Creating Tags for Other Categories That Don't Have Family Templates
      3. 4.2.3. Keynotes and Textnotes
        1. 4.2.3.1. Keynote Types
        2. 4.2.3.2. Creating a Custom Keynote
    3. 4.3. Creating Custom Title Blocks
      1. 4.3.1. Creating a Custom Title Block with the Family Editor
      2. 4.3.2. Revisions
      3. 4.3.3. Best Practices and Workarounds: Positioning Views on a Sheet
    4. 4.4. The Bottom Line
  11. 5. Customizing System Families and Project Settings in Your Template
    1. 5.1. Creating New Types of System Families
      1. 5.1.1. Wall Types
        1. 5.1.1.1. Creating Your Own Wall Types
          1. 5.1.1.1.1. The Preview Window
          2. 5.1.1.1.2. The Layers Table
          3. 5.1.1.1.3. Default Wrapping
          4. 5.1.1.1.4. Modify Vertical Structure (Section Preview only)
          5. 5.1.1.1.5. Level of Detail
          6. 5.1.1.1.6. Wall Function
      2. 5.1.2. Floor and Roof Types
      3. 5.1.3. Ceiling Types
      4. 5.1.4. Stair Types
        1. 5.1.4.1. Properties of Stairs
      5. 5.1.5. Door and Window Types
    2. 5.2. Using Types and Type Catalogs
      1. 5.2.1. Creating Family Types in the Project Environment
      2. 5.2.2. Creating Family Types in the Family Editor
      3. 5.2.3. Creating Family Types with Type Catalogs
        1. 5.2.3.1. Type Catalog Syntax
      4. 5.2.4. Loading from a Type Catalog
    3. 5.3. Customizing Project Settings in Your Template
      1. 5.3.1. Graphic Overrides of Host Objects
      2. 5.3.2. Additional Global Project Settings to Consider When Making Your Templates
        1. 5.3.2.1. Area and Volume Computations Settings
        2. 5.3.2.2. Units
        3. 5.3.2.3. Keynoting Settings
        4. 5.3.2.4. Materials
        5. 5.3.2.5. Setting Up Good Project Defaults
          1. 5.3.2.5.1. Default Wall
          2. 5.3.2.5.2. Default Doors and Windows
          3. 5.3.2.5.3. Default Dimension Types
          4. 5.3.2.5.4. Align Tool
          5. 5.3.2.5.5. Levels and Plan Views
          6. 5.3.2.5.6. Elevations
          7. 5.3.2.5.7. Views
          8. 5.3.2.5.8. View Templates
          9. 5.3.2.5.9. Color Fill Schemes
    4. 5.4. The Bottom Line
  12. 6. Modeling Principles in Revit I
    1. 6.1. Grasping the Basics of Modeling with Revit
    2. 6.2. Understanding Sketch-Based Design
      1. 6.2.1. Floors and Roofs
      2. 6.2.2. Sketching Rules of Thumb
    3. 6.3. Understanding Work Planes, Levels, Grids, Reference Planes, and Reference Lines
      1. 6.3.1. Work Planes
      2. 6.3.2. Levels
      3. 6.3.3. Grids
      4. 6.3.4. Reference Planes
        1. 6.3.4.1. Using Reference Planes in the Family Editor
      5. 6.3.5. Reference Lines
        1. 6.3.5.1. Scope Boxes
      6. 6.3.6. Work Planes in a Nutshell
        1. 6.3.6.1. Working with Work Planes
        2. 6.3.6.2. Work Plane Visibility
        3. 6.3.6.3. Other Work Plane Operations
    4. 6.4. The Bottom Line
  13. 7. Modeling Principles in Revit II
    1. 7.1. Understanding the Principles of Modeling in Revit
    2. 7.2. Modeling with the Five Basic Sketch-Based Techniques
      1. 7.2.1. Extrusions
      2. 7.2.2. Revolve
      3. 7.2.3. Sweeps
        1. 7.2.3.1. Defining the Sweep Path
        2. 7.2.3.2. Defining the Profile
        3. 7.2.3.3. Trajectory Segmentation
      4. 7.2.4. Blends
        1. 7.2.4.1. Troubleshooting Blends
        2. 7.2.4.2. Examples of Blends in Practice
      5. 7.2.5. Swept Blends
    3. 7.3. Combining Solids and Voids
      1. 7.3.1. Examples Showing Use of Voids
        1. 7.3.1.1. Vaults
        2. 7.3.1.2. Vertical Shapes
        3. 7.3.1.3. Complex Roofs
    4. 7.4. The Bottom Line
  14. 8. Concept Massing Studies
    1. 8.1. Understanding Massing Workflows
      1. 8.1.1. Massing Study Workflows
      2. 8.1.2. Revit's Massing Tools
      3. 8.1.3. Mass Creation and Visibility Tools
      4. 8.1.4. Visibility of Mass Elements
    2. 8.2. Starting a Conceptual Massing Study
      1. 8.2.1. Creating a Mass—Basics
        1. 8.2.1.1. Creating Form
      2. 8.2.2. Direct Manipulation of Mass
      3. 8.2.3. Boolean Operations
      4. 8.2.4. Join Geometry
      5. 8.2.5. Creating a New Mass Family
    3. 8.3. Understanding Form Making and Rationalization
      1. 8.3.1. Making a Parametric Extrusion
        1. 8.3.1.1. Making a Parametric Material
      2. 8.3.2. Making a Revolve
      3. 8.3.3. Making a Loft
        1. 8.3.3.1. X-Ray Mode
      4. 8.3.4. Making a Sweep
      5. 8.3.5. Rationalization of Surfaces
        1. 8.3.5.1. Divide Surface Tool
        2. 8.3.5.2. Applying a Pattern to the Surface
      6. 8.3.6. Importing 3D Conceptual Models Created in Other Applications
    4. 8.4. The Bottom Line
  15. 9. From Conceptual Mass to a Real Building
    1. 9.1. Understanding Conceptual Design and Early Studies
      1. 9.1.1. Getting Site Data and Building the Context
        1. 9.1.1.1. Scale
        2. 9.1.1.2. Orientation
      2. 9.1.2. Positioning Imported Files Relative to the Revit Project
    2. 9.2. Building the 3D Context
      1. 9.2.1. Program Check and Feasibility
      2. 9.2.2. Modeling by Face to Make a Building
        1. 9.2.2.1. Mass Floors
        2. 9.2.2.2. Verifying Your Design and Its Fit within the Defined Program
        3. 9.2.2.3. Model by Face: Walls
        4. 9.2.2.4. Model by Face: Floors
        5. 9.2.2.5. Model by Face: Roofs
        6. 9.2.2.6. Model by Face: Curtain System
      3. 9.2.3. Technical Details You Should Be Aware of When Scheduling Mass Elements
    3. 9.3. Applying 3D Components to a Divided Surface
    4. 9.4. Using Imported Geometry from Other Applications for Massing
      1. 9.4.1. SketchUp
      2. 9.4.2. Rhinoceros
      3. 9.4.3. Autodesk Maya
      4. 9.4.4. Autodesk Inventor
      5. 9.4.5. AutoCAD 2010
    5. 9.5. Using Smart Relationships between Building Mass and the Underlying Mass
    6. 9.6. The Bottom Line
  16. 10. Working with Design Options
    1. 10.1. Using Revit Design Options
      1. 10.1.1. Design Option Tools
      2. 10.1.2. Design Option Sets
      3. 10.1.3. Adding Elements to a Design Option
      4. 10.1.4. Editing a Design Option
        1. 10.1.4.1. Editing an Option by Selecting an Element
      5. 10.1.5. Displaying Design Options
    2. 10.2. Deciding on a Design Solution
      1. 10.2.1. Putting Design Options into Practice
    3. 10.3. Using Design Options with Parametric Design
      1. 10.3.1. Showing Quantities and Cost Schedules for Multiple Options
      2. 10.3.2. Working with Rooms and Design Options
    4. 10.4. The Bottom Line
  17. 11. Creating Custom 3D Content
    1. 11.1. Modeling Parametric 3D Families
      1. 11.1.1. Choosing the Right Family Template
      2. 11.1.2. Types of Families
        1. 11.1.2.1. Host-Based Families
        2. 11.1.2.2. Profile Families
        3. 11.1.2.3. 2D Line-Based Families
        4. 11.1.2.4. 3D Line-Based Families
        5. 11.1.2.5. Face-Based and Work Plane-Based Families
          1. 11.1.2.5.1. Face-Based Families
          2. 11.1.2.5.2. Work Plane-Based Families
        6. 11.1.2.6. Rich Photorealistic Content (RPC) Families
        7. 11.1.2.7. Assigning a Rendering Appearance
        8. 11.1.2.8. Detail Component Families
        9. 11.1.2.9. 3D Families
        10. 11.1.2.10. Curtain Panel Families
      3. 11.1.3. Family Categories and Parameters
        1. 11.1.3.1. Additional Family Parameters for Structural Content
    2. 11.2. Nesting One Family into Another
      1. 11.2.1. Scheduling Nested Families
      2. 11.2.2. Linking Parameters
      3. 11.2.3. Linking Parameters (Conditional Visibility)
    3. 11.3. Building Relationships between Parameters with Formulas
      1. 11.3.1. Making a Parametric Array
      2. 11.3.2. Encoding Design Rules
        1. 11.3.2.1. Example: Using a Formula to Control Dimensions
        2. 11.3.2.2. Using a Formula to Control an Array
      3. 11.3.3. Building a Parametric 3D Family
        1. 11.3.3.1. Nesting the Chair
        2. 11.3.3.2. Creating a Parametric Array
        3. 11.3.3.3. Controlling Visibility
    4. 11.4. The Bottom Line
  18. 12. Extended Modeling Techniques—Walls
    1. 12.1. Using Advanced Modeling Techniques for Standard Walls
      1. 12.1.1. Wall Core
      2. 12.1.2. Layer Join Cleanup
      3. 12.1.3. Editing Wall Joins
      4. 12.1.4. Disjoining Walls
      5. 12.1.5. Stacked Walls
      6. 12.1.6. Adding Wall Articulation
        1. 12.1.6.1. Example: Assigning Two Different Materials on the Final Finish of a Wall
      7. 12.1.7. Wall Wrapping
      8. 12.1.8. Sweeps and Reveals
        1. 12.1.8.1. Reveals
        2. 12.1.8.2. Wall Sweep Returns
        3. 12.1.8.3. Extending Wall Layers Beyond Their Base
      9. 12.1.9. Creating Custom In-Place Walls
    2. 12.2. Using Advanced Modeling Design Techniques for Curtain Walls
      1. 12.2.1. Designing a Curtain Wall
      2. 12.2.2. Curtain Panels
        1. 12.2.2.1. Selecting the Elements within the Curtain Wall
      3. 12.2.3. Curtain Wall Doors and Windows
      4. 12.2.4. Complex Curtain Wall Panels
    3. 12.3. The Bottom Line
  19. 13. Extended Modeling Techniques—Roofs and Floors
    1. 13.1. Understanding the Various Roof Creation Methods
      1. 13.1.1. Roof by Footprint
      2. 13.1.2. Roof by Extrusion
      3. 13.1.3. Roof-in-Place
        1. 13.1.3.1. Sloped Glazing
        2. 13.1.3.2. Sloped Arrows
    2. 13.2. Creating All Kinds of Roofs
      1. 13.2.1. Flat Roof
      2. 13.2.2. Gable Roof with Asymmetric Slopes
      3. 13.2.3. Shed Roof
      4. 13.2.4. Hipped Roof
      5. 13.2.5. Hip Roof Following Recessed Walls
      6. 13.2.6. Gable Roof
      7. 13.2.7. Gable Roof with Extending Pergola
      8. 13.2.8. Hip and Gable Hybrid Roof
      9. 13.2.9. Gambrel Roof
      10. 13.2.10. Dutch Gable with Glazed Roof
      11. 13.2.11. Dutch Gable
      12. 13.2.12. Hipped Roof with Sloped Arrow Dormer
      13. 13.2.13. Hipped Roof with Two Dormers
      14. 13.2.14. Four-Sided Gable
      15. 13.2.15. Hipped Roof with Extruded Roof Dormer
      16. 13.2.16. Cone Roof
      17. 13.2.17. Dome
      18. 13.2.18. Barrel Roof
      19. 13.2.19. Multipitch Roof
    3. 13.3. Working with Advanced Roof and Floor Shape Editing
      1. 13.3.1. Sloped Roofs
      2. 13.3.2. Warped Surfaces
    4. 13.4. The Bottom Line
  20. 14. Extended Modeling Techniques—Railings and Fences
    1. 14.1. Working with Railings and Fences
      1. 14.1.1. Railings
      2. 14.1.2. Subelements of the Railing Element and Principles of Railing Structure
      3. 14.1.3. Railing Construction
      4. 14.1.4. Setting Up Rail Structure
        1. 14.1.4.1. Options for Posts
        2. 14.1.4.2. Defining the Main Pattern
        3. 14.1.4.3. Balusters per Tread
        4. 14.1.4.4. Additional Controls
    2. 14.2. The Bottom Line
  21. 15. Presentation Techniques for Plans, Sections, and Elevations
    1. 15.1. Using Shadows for Presentation Purposes
      1. 15.1.1. Analytical Drawings: Sun and Shadow Studies
        1. 15.1.1.1. Enabling Shadows
        2. 15.1.1.2. Sun and Shadow Settings
        3. 15.1.1.3. Intensity
      2. 15.1.2. Create Expressive Drawings with Shadows
        1. 15.1.2.1. High-Contrast Black and White Effects
        2. 15.1.2.2. Soft Shadows
      3. 15.1.3. Performance Considerations
      4. 15.1.4. Color-Coded Plans and Sections
        1. 15.1.4.1. Color Fill Schemes
        2. 15.1.4.2. Creating Predefined Color Schemes
        3. 15.1.4.3. Colored Sections
    2. 15.2. Creating Presentation-Quality Plans and Sections
      1. 15.2.1. Coarse Scale Fill Patterns
      2. 15.2.2. Graphic Overrides and View Templates
    3. 15.3. Creating Elevations That Convey Depth
      1. 15.3.1. Linework
      2. 15.3.2. Drafting Lines
      3. 15.3.3. True-Color Elevations
      4. 15.3.4. Elevations with Transparent Materials
      5. 15.3.5. Using Images in Elevation Views
    4. 15.4. The Bottom Line
  22. 16. Presenting Perspective Views
    1. 16.1. Creating Perspective Views
      1. 16.1.1. Showing the Camera
      2. 16.1.2. Silhouetted Edge Display
    2. 16.2. Creating Photorealistic Renderings
      1. 16.2.1. The Rendering Dialog Box
        1. 16.2.1.1. Quality
        2. 16.2.1.2. Output
        3. 16.2.1.3. Lighting
          1. 16.2.1.3.1. Sunlight
          2. 16.2.1.3.2. Artificial Lights
          3. 16.2.1.3.3. Turning Off Lights in a Rendering
        4. 16.2.1.4. Background
        5. 16.2.1.5. Rendering the View
        6. 16.2.1.6. Adjusting Exposure
        7. 16.2.1.7. Saving Renderings as Images
      2. 16.2.2. Materials
        1. 16.2.2.1. Editing a Rendering Appearance
        2. 16.2.2.2. Replacing Materials
        3. 16.2.2.3. Custom Rendering Images
        4. 16.2.2.4. Adding Entourage for Rendering
      3. 16.2.3. Rendering Tips
    3. 16.3. Creating Animated Walkthroughs
    4. 16.4. Exporting the 3D Model for Use in Other Applications
    5. 16.5. The Bottom Line
  23. 17. Fine-Tuning Your Preliminary Design
    1. 17.1. Quantifying Your Preliminary Designs
      1. 17.1.1. The Foundation Model
      2. 17.1.2. Calculating Area Plans
      3. 17.1.3. Rooms and Room Tags
      4. 17.1.4. Area Plans
        1. 17.1.4.1. Creating a Gross Area Plan
        2. 17.1.4.2. Creating a Rentable Area Plan
      5. 17.1.5. Adding Areas and Tags
    2. 17.2. Creating Schedules
      1. 17.2.1. Making a Simple Schedule (Rentable Area)
      2. 17.2.2. Placing the Schedule on a Sheet
      3. 17.2.3. Additional Schedule Capabilities
    3. 17.3. Using Schedules for Preliminary Cost Estimates
      1. 17.3.1. Editing the Graphic Appearance of a Schedule
        1. 17.3.1.1. New Options in Revit 2010
    4. 17.4. The Bottom Line
  24. 18. Evaluating Your Preliminary Design: Sustainability
    1. 18.1. Incorporating a Sustainable Approach from the Beginning
      1. 18.1.1. Preliminary Design Tools
      2. 18.1.2. The LEED Rating System
    2. 18.2. Using Revit to Create Sun Studies
      1. 18.2.1. Making a Solar Study
      2. 18.2.2. Animated Sun Studies
        1. 18.2.2.1. Previewing a Solar Study
        2. 18.2.2.2. Exporting the Animation
    3. 18.3. Tracking Recycled Materials and Other Sustainability Strategies Using Schedules
      1. 18.3.1. Recycled Materials
      2. 18.3.2. Window Surface Percentage vs. Room Area
      3. 18.3.3. Energy Analysis
        1. 18.3.3.1. IES <VE>
        2. 18.3.3.2. gbXML
          1. 18.3.3.2.1. Exporting to gbXML
          2. 18.3.3.2.2. Green Building Studio
    4. 18.4. Daylighting
      1. 18.4.1. Quality Control Measures
    5. 18.5. The Bottom Line
  25. 19. Annotating Your Model
    1. 19.1. Annotating Views
      1. 19.1.1. Creating and Annotating Rooms
      2. 19.1.2. Room Separation Lines
      3. 19.1.3. Selecting Rooms
        1. 19.1.3.1. Graphical Selection
        2. 19.1.3.2. Selecting a Room from a Schedule Table
      4. 19.1.4. Rooms and Room Tags
      5. 19.1.5. Rooms in Section Views
      6. 19.1.6. Room Properties
      7. 19.1.7. Area and Volume Computations
        1. 19.1.7.1. Calculating Volumes of Rooms with Variable Widths
    2. 19.2. Using Schedule Keys
      1. 19.2.1. Creating a Schedule Key
    3. 19.3. Leveraging Tags
      1. 19.3.1. Loading Tags
      2. 19.3.2. Placing Tags
      3. 19.3.3. Changing a Tag Value
      4. 19.3.4. Tagging Untagged Elements
        1. 19.3.4.1. Tagging Elements in Plan: Doors
    4. 19.4. Understanding Project and Shared Parameters
      1. 19.4.1. Creating a Custom Project Parameter
      2. 19.4.2. Creating Shared Parameters
        1. 19.4.2.1. Creating the Shared Parameter File
        2. 19.4.2.2. Creating a Group of Parameters
        3. 19.4.2.3. Creating the Shared Parameter
        4. 19.4.2.4. Creating a New Project Parameter Using the Shared Parameter and Assigning It to a Category
        5. 19.4.2.5. Setting the Shared Parameter in the Objects That Belong to the Selected Category (Doors)
        6. 19.4.2.6. Adding the Shared Parameter to a Door Tag
    5. 19.5. Adding Text and Keynotes
      1. 19.5.1. Text
      2. 19.5.2. Keynotes and Textnotes
      3. 19.5.3. Keynote Behavior and Editing
      4. 19.5.4. Keynote Filenaming Conventions
      5. 19.5.5. Keynote Settings
      6. 19.5.6. Adding Keynotes to a View
      7. 19.5.7. Keynote Legends
      8. 19.5.8. The Keynote Family
        1. 19.5.8.1. Adding Notes to a Wall Section by Material
        2. 19.5.8.2. Adding Notes to a Wall Section by Element
      9. 19.5.9. Predefining Keynotes
    6. 19.6. The Bottom Line
  26. 20. Developing the Design with SmartWorkflows
    1. 20.1. Working with Repetitive Elements
    2. 20.2. Understanding How to Use Groups
      1. 20.2.1. Using Groups for Repetitive Rooms
      2. 20.2.2. Creating and Managing Groups
      3. 20.2.3. Creating and Placing Repetitive Units Using Groups
      4. 20.2.4. Adding Rooms to a Group
      5. 20.2.5. Nesting a Group into Another Group
      6. 20.2.6. Adding Detail Elements to Groups
      7. 20.2.7. Nesting a Group from a Previous Project
      8. 20.2.8. Making Variations to a Group Instance
      9. 20.2.9. Repeating Groups on Other Levels
      10. 20.2.10. Making the Group a Part of the Project
      11. 20.2.11. Editing a Group in a Separate File
      12. 20.2.12. Detail Groups
      13. 20.2.13. Best Practices for Grouping
    3. 20.3. Understanding the Principles of Links
      1. 20.3.1. Common Link Use Cases
        1. 20.3.1.1. Coordination with Other Disciplines
      2. 20.3.2. Linking Files
      3. 20.3.3. Special Link Features
      4. 20.3.4. Controlling the Visibility of Links
    4. 20.4. Deciding Whether to Use Groups, Links, or Both
      1. 20.4.1. Final Considerations
    5. 20.5. The Bottom Line
  27. 21. Moving from Design to Detailed Documentation
    1. 21.1. Advancing the Design
    2. 21.2. Creating Drafting Views
    3. 21.3. Importing and Linking CAD Details
      1. 21.3.1. Linking vs. Importing
        1. 21.3.1.1. Linking CAD Formats
        2. 21.3.1.2. Importing or Linking CAD Formats
        3. 21.3.1.3. Options During Import/Link
        4. 21.3.1.4. Importing CAD Details
    4. 21.4. Creating 2D Detail Components
      1. 21.4.1. Detail Groups
      2. 21.4.2. Detail Components
      3. 21.4.3. Masking Regions
      4. 21.4.4. Creating a Repeating Detail Element
      5. 21.4.5. Detail Component Properties
      6. 21.4.6. Creating Custom Line Types Using Repeating Details
      7. 21.4.7. Miscellaneous Line Tools
        1. 21.4.7.1. Insulation
        2. 21.4.7.2. Region
          1. 21.4.7.2.1. Region Type Properties
        3. 21.4.7.3. Showing Hidden Elements with Dashed Lines
      8. 21.4.8. Linework
      9. 21.4.9. Using Callouts
      10. 21.4.10. Adding Information to Your Details
      11. 21.4.11. Embellishing the Wall Section: The SIM (Similar) Condition
      12. 21.4.12. Adding Detail Components
        1. 21.4.12.1. Editing a Detail Component
        2. 21.4.12.2. Finishing the Detail
      13. 21.4.13. Embellishing the Wall Section: The Model Details
        1. 21.4.13.1. Reusing Drafting Lines
        2. 21.4.13.2. Modifying the Floor Condition
        3. 21.4.13.3. Creating a Masking Region
        4. 21.4.13.4. Adding the Base Molding
        5. 21.4.13.5. Modifying the Floor and Ceiling Connections and Details
        6. 21.4.13.6. Adding Repeating Details
        7. 21.4.13.7. Nesting Detail Components
        8. 21.4.13.8. Finishing the Detail
    5. 21.5. The Bottom Line
  28. 22. Advanced Detailing Techniques
    1. 22.1. Creating 3D Details
      1. 22.1.1. 3D Details: Enabling a Section Box in 3D View
      2. 22.1.2. 3D Details: Orienting to View
      3. 22.1.3. Adding Annotations to the 3D Detail
    2. 22.2. Adding Detail Components to Families
      1. 22.2.1. Adding Details to a Window Family
      2. 22.2.2. Visibility Settings
      3. 22.2.3. Adding More Information Using Symbolic Lines
    3. 22.3. Reusing Details from Other Revit Projects
      1. 22.3.1. Exporting Details from Revit Projects
      2. 22.3.2. Importing Views into Revit Projects
    4. 22.4. The Bottom Line
  29. 23. Tracking Changes in Your Model
    1. 23.1. Adding Revisions to Your Project
      1. 23.1.1. Placing Revision Clouds
      2. 23.1.2. Tagging a Revision Cloud
        1. 23.1.2.1. Customizing the Tag
        2. 23.1.2.2. Disabling the Leader
    2. 23.2. BIM and Supplemental Drawings
    3. 23.3. Using Autodesk Design Review
      1. 23.3.1. The Design Review User Interface
        1. 23.3.1.1. Selecting Elements in Design Review
      2. 23.3.2. Exporting to Design Review
        1. 23.3.2.1. DWF Exports
      3. 23.3.3. Marking Up the Model Using Design Review
      4. 23.3.4. Importing a Design Review Markup
    4. 23.4. The Bottom Line
  30. 24. Worksharing
    1. 24.1. Setting Up a Project with Worksets
    2. 24.2. Understanding Worksharing Basics
      1. 24.2.1. Workset Organization
      2. 24.2.2. Moving Elements Between Worksets
    3. 24.3. Managing Workflow with Worksets
      1. 24.3.1. Creating a Central File
      2. 24.3.2. Creating the Local File
      3. 24.3.3. Saving Shared Work
      4. 24.3.4. Loading Work from Other Team Members
    4. 24.4. Understanding Element Ownership in Worksets
      1. 24.4.1. Borrowing Elements
      2. 24.4.2. Requesting Permission
      3. 24.4.3. Granting Permission
      4. 24.4.4. Closing Revit
    5. 24.5. The Bottom Line
  31. A. The Bottom Line
    1. A.1. Chapter 1: Understanding Basic BIM: From the Basics to Advanced Realities
    2. A.2. Chapter 2: Revit Fundamentals
    3. A.3. Chapter 3: Know Your Editing Tools
    4. A.4. Chapter 4: Setting Up Your Templates and Office Standards
    5. A.5. Chapter 5: Customizing System Families and Project Settings in Your Template
    6. A.6. Chapter 6: Modeling Principles in Revit I
    7. A.7. Chapter 7: Modeling Principles in Revit II
    8. A.8. Chapter 8: Concept Massing Studies
    9. A.9. Chapter 9: From Conceptual Mass to a Real Building
    10. A.10. Chapter 10: Working with Design Options
    11. A.11. Chapter 11: Creating Custom 3D Content
    12. A.12. Chapter 12: Extended Modeling Techniques—Walls
    13. A.13. Chapter 13: Extended Modeling Techniques—Roofs and Floors
    14. A.14. Chapter 14: Extended Modeling Techniques—Railing and Fences
    15. A.15. Chapter 15: Presentation Techniques for Plans, Sections, and Elevations
    16. A.16. Chapter 16: Presenting Perspective Views
    17. A.17. Chapter 17: Fine-Tuning Your Preliminary Design
    18. A.18. Chapter 18: Evaluating Your Preliminary Design: Sustainability
    19. A.19. Chapter 19: Annotating Your Model
    20. A.20. Chapter 20: Developing the Design with Smart Workflows
    21. A.21. Chapter 21: Moving from Design to Detailed Documentation
    22. A.22. Chapter 22: Advanced Detailing Techniques
    23. A.23. Chapter 23: Tracking Changes in Your Model
    24. A.24. Chapter 24: Worksharing
  32. B. Tips and Troubleshooting
    1. B.1. Optimizing Performance
    2. B.2. Using Best Practices
    3. B.3. Dealing with File Corruption
    4. B.4. Getting Started in Revit
    5. B.5. Finding Additional Resources
  33. Mastering Revit Architecture Project Gallery
    1. Burt, Hill USA
    2. Nemeth, Polakova, Senteska Slovakia
    3. Case Design USA
    4. Gensler USA
    5. To Pluss To Norway
    6. HOK Worldwide
    7. WATG USA
    8. Ellerbe Becket USA
    9. Montealegre Beach Arquitectos Ltda Chile
    10. Link Landskap Norway
    11. E. N. Raycroft; T. Castro; A. Blood; D. Belcher USA