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Mastering AutoCAD® Civil 3D® 2011: Autodesk Offical Training Guide

Book Description

Design Your Way from Field to Finish with This Expert Guide

Create winning designs and effectively manage every stage of your projects with this Autodesk Official Training Guide for Autodesk's powerful civil engineering software. Authored by experts with close ties to the software development team and the Civil 3D community, this book offers an in-depth, tutorial-based approach that is grounded in real-world examples so that you can get the most out of Civil 3D.

Fully updated for Civil 3D 2011's new features, such as advanced tools for geospatial and earthwork analysis, this book not only shows you how to use Civil 3D in a production environment, it also prepares you for Autodesk's Civil 3D 2011 Certified Associate and Certified Professional exams.

Table of Contents

  1. Copyright
  2. Dear Reader,
  3. Acknowledgments
  4. About the Authors
  5. Introduction
    1. Who Should Read This Book
    2. What You Will Learn
    3. What You Need
    4. The Mastering Series
    5. What Is Covered in This Book
    6. How to Contact the Authors
  6. 1. Getting Dirty: The Basics of Civil 3D
    1. 1.1. Windows on the Model
      1. 1.1.1. Toolspace
        1. 1.1.1.1. Prospector
          1. 1.1.1.1.1. Open Drawings
          2. 1.1.1.1.2. Projects
          3. 1.1.1.1.3. Data Shortcuts
          4. 1.1.1.1.4. Drawing Templates
        2. 1.1.1.2. Settings
          1. 1.1.1.2.1. Drawing Settings
          2. 1.1.1.2.2. Units and Zone Tab
          3. 1.1.1.2.3. Transformation Tab
          4. 1.1.1.2.4. Object Layers Tab
          5. 1.1.1.2.5. Abbreviations Tab
          6. 1.1.1.2.6. Ambient Settings Tab
          7. 1.1.1.2.7. Object Settings
        3. 1.1.1.3. Survey
        4. 1.1.1.4. Toolbox
      2. 1.1.2. Panorama
      3. 1.1.3. Ribbon
    2. 1.2. It's All About Style
      1. 1.2.1. Label Styles
      2. 1.2.2. Object Styles
    3. 1.3. The Underlying Engine
    4. 1.4. The Bottom Line
  7. 2. Back to Basics: Lines and Curves
    1. 2.1. Labeling Lines and Curves
      1. 2.1.1. Coordinate Line Commands
        1. 2.1.1.1. Line Command
        2. 2.1.1.2. Create Line by Point # Range Command
        3. 2.1.1.3. Create Line by Point Object Command
        4. 2.1.1.4. Create Line by Point Name Command
        5. 2.1.1.5. Create Line by Northing/Easting and Create Line by Grid Northing/Easting Commands
        6. 2.1.1.6. Create Line by Latitude/Longitude Command
      2. 2.1.2. Direction-Based Line Commands
        1. 2.1.2.1. Create Line by Bearing Command
        2. 2.1.2.2. Create Line by Azimuth Command
        3. 2.1.2.3. Create Line by Angle Command
        4. 2.1.2.4. Create Line by Deflection Command
        5. 2.1.2.5. Create Line by Station/Offset Command
        6. 2.1.2.6. Create Line by Side Shot Command
        7. 2.1.2.7. Create Line Extension Command
        8. 2.1.2.8. Create Line from End of Object Command
        9. 2.1.2.9. Create Line Tangent from Point Command
        10. 2.1.2.10. Create Line Perpendicular from Point Command
    2. 2.2. Creating Curves
      1. 2.2.1. Standard Curves
        1. 2.2.1.1. Create Curve between Two Lines Command
        2. 2.2.1.2. Create Curve on Two Lines Command
        3. 2.2.1.3. Create Curve through Point Command
        4. 2.2.1.4. Create Multiple Curves Command
        5. 2.2.1.5. Create Curve from End of Object Command
        6. 2.2.1.6. Create Reverse or Compound Curves Command
      2. 2.2.2. Re-creating a Deed Using Line and Curve Tools
      3. 2.2.3. Best Fit Entities
        1. 2.2.3.1. Create Best Fit Line Command
        2. 2.2.3.2. Create Best Fit Arc Command
        3. 2.2.3.3. Create Best Fit Parabola Command
      4. 2.2.4. Attach Multiple Entities
      5. 2.2.5. The Curve Calculator
      6. 2.2.6. Adding Line and Curve Labels
      7. 2.2.7. Converting Curve Labels to Tags and Making a Curve Table
    3. 2.3. Using Transparent Commands
      1. 2.3.1. Standard Transparent Commands
      2. 2.3.2. Matching Transparent Commands
    4. 2.4. Using Inquiry Commands
    5. 2.5. Establishing Drawing Settings
      1. 2.5.1. Drawing Settings: Units and Zone
      2. 2.5.2. Drawing Settings: Ambient Settings
      3. 2.5.3. Checking Your Work: The Mapcheck Analysis
    6. 2.6. The Bottom Line
  8. 3. Lay of the Land: Survey
    1. 3.1. Understanding the Concepts
    2. 3.2. Databases Everywhere!
      1. 3.2.1. The Equipment Database
      2. 3.2.2. The Figure Prefix Database
        1. 3.2.2.1. Figure Settings
      3. 3.2.3. The Survey Database
        1. 3.2.3.1. The Survey Database Settings
        2. 3.2.3.2. Survey Database Components
      4. 3.2.4. The Linework Code Sets Database
      5. 3.2.5. Creating a Field Book
      6. 3.2.6. Working with Field Books
        1. 3.2.6.1. Control Points
        2. 3.2.6.2. Non-Control Points
        3. 3.2.6.3. Directions
        4. 3.2.6.4. Setups
        5. 3.2.6.5. Traverses
        6. 3.2.6.6. Other Methods of Manipulating Survey Data
      7. 3.2.7. Other Survey Features
    3. 3.3. The Bottom Line
  9. 4. X Marks the Spot: Points
    1. 4.1. Anatomy of a Point
    2. 4.2. Creating Basic Points
      1. 4.2.1. Point Settings
        1. 4.2.1.1. Default Layer
        2. 4.2.1.2. Prompt for Elevations, Names, and Descriptions
      2. 4.2.2. Importing Points from a Text File
        1. 4.2.2.1. Importing a Text File of Points
      3. 4.2.3. Converting Points from Land Desktop, Softdesk, and Other Sources
        1. 4.2.3.1. Converting Points
      4. 4.2.4. Getting to Know the Create Points Dialog
        1. 4.2.4.1. Creating Points
    3. 4.3. Basic Point Editing
      1. 4.3.1. Physical Point Edits
      2. 4.3.2. Properties Box Point Edits
      3. 4.3.3. Panorama and Prospector Point Edits
      4. 4.3.4. Changing Point Elevations
    4. 4.4. Point Styles
    5. 4.5. Point Label Styles
      1. 4.5.1. Creating More Complex Point and Point-Label Styles
    6. 4.6. Point Tables
    7. 4.7. User-Defined Properties
      1. 4.7.1. Creating a Point Table and User-Defined Properties for Tree Points
      2. 4.7.2. Creating a Point Group to Control Visibility and Moving a Point Group to Surface
      3. 4.7.3. Working with Description Keys
        1. 4.7.3.1. Creating a Description Key Set
        2. 4.7.3.2. Creating Description Keys
        3. 4.7.3.3. Advanced Description Key Parameters
        4. 4.7.3.4. Activating a Description Key Set
    8. 4.8. The Bottom Line
  10. 5. The Ground Up: Surfaces in Civil 3D
    1. 5.1. Digging In
    2. 5.2. Creating Surfaces
      1. 5.2.1. Free Surface Information
        1. 5.2.1.1. Surfaces from Government Digital Elevation Models
        2. 5.2.1.2. Surfaces from Google Earth
      2. 5.2.2. Inexpensive Surface Approximations
        1. 5.2.2.1. Surfaces from Aerial Contour Information
        2. 5.2.2.2. Surfaces from Point Clouds or Text Files
      3. 5.2.3. On-the-Ground Surveying
    3. 5.3. Refining and Editing Surfaces
      1. 5.3.1. Surface Properties
      2. 5.3.2. Surface Additions
        1. 5.3.2.1. Adding Breakline Information
        2. 5.3.2.2. Adding a Surface Border
        3. 5.3.2.3. Surface Masks
        4. 5.3.2.4. Surface Cropping
        5. 5.3.2.5. Manual Surface Edits
          1. 5.3.2.5.1. Point and Triangle Editing
          2. 5.3.2.5.2. Surface Smoothing
          3. 5.3.2.5.3. Surface Simplifying
    4. 5.4. Surface Styling and Analysis
      1. 5.4.1. Surface Styles
        1. 5.4.1.1. The Contouring Basics
        2. 5.4.1.2. Elevation Banding
      2. 5.4.2. Slopes and Slope Arrows
    5. 5.5. Comparing Surfaces
      1. 5.5.1. Simple Volumes
      2. 5.5.2. Volume Surfaces
    6. 5.6. Labeling the Surface
      1. 5.6.1. Contour Labeling
        1. 5.6.1.1. Placing Contour Labels
        2. 5.6.1.2. Contour Labeling Styles
      2. 5.6.2. Surface Point Labels
        1. 5.6.2.1. Labeling Slopes
        2. 5.6.2.2. Critical Points
        3. 5.6.2.3. Surface Grid Labels
    7. 5.7. Point Cloud Surfaces
      1. 5.7.1. Importing a Point Cloud
        1. 5.7.1.1. Importing a Point Cloud
        2. 5.7.1.2. Creating a Point Cloud Surface
    8. 5.8. The Bottom Line
  11. 6. Don't Fence Me In: Parcels
    1. 6.1. Creating and Managing Sites
      1. 6.1.1. Best Practices for Site Topology Interaction
      2. 6.1.2. Creating a New Site
    2. 6.2. Creating a Boundary Parcel
    3. 6.3. Creating a Wetlands Parcel
    4. 6.4. Creating a Right-of-Way Parcel
    5. 6.5. Creating Subdivision Lot Parcels Using Precise Sizing Tools
      1. 6.5.1. Attached Parcel Segments
      2. 6.5.2. Precise Sizing Settings
        1. 6.5.2.1. New Parcel Sizing
        2. 6.5.2.2. Automatic Layout
      3. 6.5.3. Slide Line – Create Tool
      4. 6.5.4. Swing Line – Create Tool
    6. 6.6. Creating Open Space Parcels Using the Free Form Create Tool
    7. 6.7. Editing Parcels by Deleting Parcel Segments
    8. 6.8. Best Practices for Parcel Creation
      1. 6.8.1. Forming Parcels from Segments
      2. 6.8.2. Parcels Reacting to Site Objects
      3. 6.8.3. Constructing Parcel Segments with the Appropriate Vertices
    9. 6.9. Labeling Parcel Areas
    10. 6.10. Labeling Parcel Segments
      1. 6.10.1. Labeling Multiple Parcel Segments
      2. 6.10.2. Labeling Spanning Segments
      3. 6.10.3. Adding Curve Tags to Prepare for Table Creation
      4. 6.10.4. Creating a Table for Parcel Segments
    11. 6.11. The Bottom Line
  12. 7. Laying a Path: Alignments
    1. 7.1. Alignments, Pickles, and Freedom
      1. 7.1.1. Alignments and Sites
      2. 7.1.2. Alignment Entities and Freedom
    2. 7.2. Creating an Alignment
      1. 7.2.1. Creating from a Polyline
      2. 7.2.2. Creating by Layout
      3. 7.2.3. Creating with Design Constraints and Check Sets
    3. 7.3. Editing Alignment Geometry
      1. 7.3.1. Grip-Editing
      2. 7.3.2. Tabular Design
      3. 7.3.3. Component-Level Editing
      4. 7.3.4. Changing Alignment Components
    4. 7.4. Alignments as Objects
      1. 7.4.1. Renaming Objects
      2. 7.4.2. The Right Station
      3. 7.4.3. Assigning Design Speeds
      4. 7.4.4. Banking Turn Two
    5. 7.5. Styling Alignments
      1. 7.5.1. The Alignment
      2. 7.5.2. Labeling Alignments
        1. 7.5.2.1. The Power of Label Sets
          1. 7.5.2.1.1. Major Station
          2. 7.5.2.1.2. Geometry Points
          3. 7.5.2.1.3. Label Set
        2. 7.5.2.2. Station Offset Labeling
        3. 7.5.2.3. Segment Labeling
      3. 7.5.3. Alignment Tables
        1. 7.5.3.1. Creating a Line Table
        2. 7.5.3.2. An Alignment Segment Table
    6. 7.6. The Bottom Line
  13. 8. Cut to the Chase: Profiles
    1. 8.1. Elevate Me
      1. 8.1.1. Surface Sampling
      2. 8.1.2. Layout Profiles
        1. 8.1.2.1. Layout by PVI
        2. 8.1.2.2. Layout by Entity
        3. 8.1.2.3. Creating a Profile from a File
      3. 8.1.3. Editing Profiles
        1. 8.1.3.1. Grip Profile Editing
        2. 8.1.3.2. Parameter and Panorama Profile Editing
        3. 8.1.3.3. Component-Level Editing
    2. 8.2. Profile Display and Stylization
      1. 8.2.1. Profile Styles
        1. 8.2.1.1. Profile Labels
        2. 8.2.1.2. Applying Labels
        3. 8.2.1.3. Station Labels
        4. 8.2.1.4. Line Labels
        5. 8.2.1.5. Curve Labels
        6. 8.2.1.6. Grade Breaks
        7. 8.2.1.7. Profile Label Sets
    3. 8.3. The Bottom Line
  14. 9. Slice and Dice: Profile Views in Civil 3D
    1. 9.1. A Better Point of View
      1. 9.1.1. Creating During Sampling
      2. 9.1.2. Creating Manually
      3. 9.1.3. Splitting Views
        1. 9.1.3.1. Creating Manually Limited Profile Views
        2. 9.1.3.2. Creating Staggered Profile Views
        3. 9.1.3.3. Creating Gapped Profile Views
        4. 9.1.3.4. Creating Stacked Profile Views
    2. 9.2. Profile Utilities
      1. 9.2.1. Superimposing Profiles
      2. 9.2.2. Object Projection
    3. 9.3. Editing Profile Views
      1. 9.3.1. Profile View Properties
        1. 9.3.1.1. Adjusting the Profile View Station Limits
        2. 9.3.1.2. Adjusting the Profile View Elevations
        3. 9.3.1.3. Profile Display Options
        4. 9.3.1.4. Profile View Bands
        5. 9.3.1.5. Profile View Hatch
      2. 9.3.2. Profile View Styles
        1. 9.3.2.1. Profile View Style Selection
        2. 9.3.2.2. Profile View Style Editing
      3. 9.3.3. Labeling Styles
        1. 9.3.3.1. View Annotation
        2. 9.3.3.2. Band Sets
    4. 9.4. The Bottom Line
  15. 10. Templates Plus: Assemblies and Subassemblies
    1. 10.1. Subassemblies
      1. 10.1.1. The Corridor Modeling Catalog
        1. 10.1.1.1. Accessing the Corridor Modeling Catalog
        2. 10.1.1.2. Accessing Subassembly Help
        3. 10.1.1.3. Adding Subassemblies to a Tool Palette
    2. 10.2. Building Assemblies
      1. 10.2.1. Creating a Typical Road Assembly
        1. 10.2.1.1. The BasicLane Subassembly
        2. 10.2.1.2. The BasicCurbandGutter Subassembly
        3. 10.2.1.3. The BasicSidewalk Subassembly
      2. 10.2.2. Alternative Subassemblies
        1. 10.2.2.1. Alternatives to the BasicLane Subassembly
          1. 10.2.2.1.1. BasicLaneTransition
          2. 10.2.2.1.2. LaneParabolic
          3. 10.2.2.1.3. LaneBrokenBack
        2. 10.2.2.2. Alternatives to the BasicCurbandGutter
          1. 10.2.2.2.1. BasicCurb
          2. 10.2.2.2.2. BasicShoulder
          3. 10.2.2.2.3. UrbanCurbGutterGeneral
        3. 10.2.2.3. Alternatives to the BasicSidewalk Subassembly
          1. 10.2.2.3.1. UrbanSidewalk
      3. 10.2.3. Editing an Assembly
        1. 10.2.3.1. Editing a Single Subassembly
        2. 10.2.3.2. Editing the Entire Assembly
        3. 10.2.3.3. Renaming the Assembly
        4. 10.2.3.4. Changing Parameters
        5. 10.2.3.5. Renaming Groups and Subassemblies
      4. 10.2.4. Creating Assemblies for Nonroad Uses
    3. 10.3. Working with Generic Subassemblies
      1. 10.3.1. Enhancing Assemblies Using Generic Links
    4. 10.4. Working with Daylight Subassemblies
      1. 10.4.1. Enhancing an Assembly with a Daylight Subassembly
        1. 10.4.1.1. Alternative Daylight Subassemblies
          1. 10.4.1.1.1. DaylightToROW
          2. 10.4.1.1.2. BasicSideSlopeCutDitch
          3. 10.4.1.1.3. DaylightBasin
    5. 10.5. Saving Subassemblies and Assemblies for Later Use
      1. 10.5.1. Storing a Customized Subassembly on a Tool Palette
      2. 10.5.2. Storing a Completed Assembly on a Tool Palette
    6. 10.6. The Bottom Line
  16. 11. Easy Does It: Basic Corridors
    1. 11.1. Understanding Corridors
    2. 11.2. Creating a Simple Road Corridor
      1. 11.2.1. Utilities for Viewing Your Corridor
      2. 11.2.2. Rebuilding Your Corridor
      3. 11.2.3. Common Corridor Problems
    3. 11.3. Corridor Anatomy
      1. 11.3.1. Points
      2. 11.3.2. Links
      3. 11.3.3. Shapes
      4. 11.3.4. Corridor Feature Lines
    4. 11.4. Adding a Surface Target for Daylighting
      1. 11.4.1. Common Daylighting Problems
    5. 11.5. Applying a Hatch Pattern to a Corridor
    6. 11.6. Creating a Corridor Surface
      1. 11.6.1. The Corridor Surface
      2. 11.6.2. Creation Fundamentals
        1. 11.6.2.1. Data Types
          1. 11.6.2.1.1. Creating a Surface from Link Data
          2. 11.6.2.1.2. Creating a Surface from Feature Lines
          3. 11.6.2.1.3. Creating a Surface from Both Link Data and Feature Lines
        2. 11.6.2.2. Other Surface Tasks
      3. 11.6.3. Adding a Surface Boundary
        1. 11.6.3.1. Boundary Types
        2. 11.6.3.2. Common Surface Creation Problems
    7. 11.7. Performing a Volume Calculation
      1. 11.7.1. Common Volume Problem
    8. 11.8. Creating a Corridor with a Lane Widening
      1. 11.8.1. Using Target Alignments
      2. 11.8.2. Common Transition Problems
      3. 11.8.3. Creating a Stream Corridor
    9. 11.9. The Bottom Line
  17. 12. The Road Ahead: Advanced Corridors
    1. 12.1. Getting Creative with Corridor Models
    2. 12.2. Using Alignment and Profile Targets to Model a Roadside Swale
      1. 12.2.1. Corridor Utilities
    3. 12.3. Modeling a Peer-Road Intersection
      1. 12.3.1. Using the Intersection Wizard
      2. 12.3.2. Manually Adding a Baseline and Region for an Intersecting Road
      3. 12.3.3. Creating an Assembly for the Intersection
      4. 12.3.4. Adding Baselines, Regions, and Targets for the Intersections
      5. 12.3.5. Troubleshooting Your Intersection
        1. 12.3.5.1. Your Lanes Appear to Be Backward
        2. 12.3.5.2. Your Intersection Drops Down to Zero
        3. 12.3.5.3. Your Lanes Extend Too Far in Some Directions
        4. 12.3.5.4. Your Lanes Don't Extend Far Enough
      6. 12.3.6. Building a First-Draft Corridor Surface
      7. 12.3.7. Perfecting Your Model to Optimize the Design
      8. 12.3.8. Refining a Corridor Surface
    4. 12.4. Modeling a Cul-de-sac
      1. 12.4.1. Adding a Baseline, Region, and Targets for the Cul-de-sac
      2. 12.4.2. Troubleshooting Your Cul-de-sac
        1. 12.4.2.1. Your Cul-de-sac Appears with a Large Gap in the Center
        2. 12.4.2.2. Your Cul-de-sac Appears to Be Backward
        3. 12.4.2.3. Your Cul-de-sac Drops Down to Zero
        4. 12.4.2.4. Your Cul-de-sac Seems Flat
    5. 12.5. Modeling a Widening with an Assembly Offset
    6. 12.6. Using a Feature Line as a Width and Elevation Target
    7. 12.7. The Bottom Line
  18. 13. Stacking Up: Cross Sections
    1. 13.1. The Corridor
    2. 13.2. Lining Up for Samples
      1. 13.2.1. Creating Sample Lines along a Corridor
      2. 13.2.2. Editing the Swath Width of a Sample Line Group
    3. 13.3. Creating the Views
    4. 13.4. Creating a Single-Section View
    5. 13.5. It's a Material World
      1. 13.5.1. Creating a Materials List
      2. 13.5.2. Creating a Volume Table in the Drawing
      3. 13.5.3. Adding Soil Factors to a Materials List
      4. 13.5.4. Generating a Volume Report
    6. 13.6. A Little More Sampling
      1. 13.6.1. Adding a Pipe Network to a Sample Line Group
    7. 13.7. Annotating the Sections
    8. 13.8. The Bottom Line
  19. 14. The Tool Chest: Parts Lists and Part Builder
    1. 14.1. Planning a Typical Pipe Network: A Sanitary Sewer Example
    2. 14.2. The Part Catalog
      1. 14.2.1. The Structures Domain
      2. 14.2.2. The Pipes Domain
      3. 14.2.3. The Supporting Files
    3. 14.3. Part Builder
      1. 14.3.1. Parametric Parts
      2. 14.3.2. Part Builder Orientation
        1. 14.3.2.1. Understanding the Organization of Part Builder
        2. 14.3.2.2. Exploring Part Families
      3. 14.3.3. Adding a Part Size Using Part Builder
      4. 14.3.4. Sharing a Custom Part
      5. 14.3.5. Adding an Arch Pipe to Your Part Catalog
    4. 14.4. Part Styles
      1. 14.4.1. Creating Structure Styles
        1. 14.4.1.1. The Model Tab
        2. 14.4.1.2. The Plan Tab
        3. 14.4.1.3. The Profile Tab
        4. 14.4.1.4. The Display Tab
        5. 14.4.1.5. Creating Structure Styles for a Sanitary Manhole and Sanitary Cleanout
      2. 14.4.2. Creating Pipe Styles
        1. 14.4.2.1. The Plan Tab
        2. 14.4.2.2. The Profile Tab
        3. 14.4.2.3. The Section Tab
        4. 14.4.2.4. The Display Tab
        5. 14.4.2.5. Creating a Pipe Style for a Sanitary Sewer
    5. 14.5. Part Rules
      1. 14.5.1. Structure Rules
        1. 14.5.1.1. Maximum Pipe Size Check
        2. 14.5.1.2. Pipe Drop Across Structure
        3. 14.5.1.3. Set Sump Depth
      2. 14.5.2. Pipe Rules
        1. 14.5.2.1. Cover And Slope Rule
        2. 14.5.2.2. Cover Only Rule
        3. 14.5.2.3. Pipe to Pipe Match Rule
        4. 14.5.2.4. Length Check
      3. 14.5.3. Creating Structure and Pipe Rule Sets
    6. 14.6. Parts List
      1. 14.6.1. Adding Part Families on the Pipes Tab
        1. 14.6.1.1. Modifying Styles and Rules
      2. 14.6.2. Adding Part Families on the Structures Tab
        1. 14.6.2.1. Modifying Styles and Rules
        2. 14.6.2.2. Modifying Pay Items
      3. 14.6.3. Creating a Parts List for a Sanitary Sewer
    7. 14.7. The Bottom Line
  20. 15. Running Downhill: Pipe Networks
    1. 15.1. Exploring Pipe Networks
    2. 15.2. Pipe Network Object Types
    3. 15.3. Creating a Sanitary Sewer Network
      1. 15.3.1. Creating a Pipe Network with Layout Tools
      2. 15.3.2. Establishing Pipe Network Parameters
      3. 15.3.3. Using the Network Layout Creation Tools
        1. 15.3.3.1. Placing Parts in a Network
        2. 15.3.3.2. Creating a Sanitary Sewer Network
      4. 15.3.4. Creating a Storm Drainage Pipe Network from a Feature Line
    4. 15.4. Changing Flow Direction
    5. 15.5. Editing a Pipe Network
      1. 15.5.1. Editing Your Network in Plan View
      2. 15.5.2. Making Tabular Edits to Your Pipe Network
      3. 15.5.3. Shortcut Menu Edits
      4. 15.5.4. Editing with the Network Layout Tools Toolbar
    6. 15.6. Creating an Alignment from Network Parts
    7. 15.7. Drawing Parts in Profile View
      1. 15.7.1. Vertical Movement Edits Using Grips in Profile
      2. 15.7.2. Removing a Part from Profile View
      3. 15.7.3. Showing Pipes That Cross the Profile View
    8. 15.8. Adding Pipe Network Labels
      1. 15.8.1. Creating a Labeled Pipe Network Profile Including Crossings
      2. 15.8.2. Pipe Labels
      3. 15.8.3. Structure Labels
      4. 15.8.4. Special Profile Attachment Points for Structure Labels
    9. 15.9. Creating an Interference Check between a Storm and Sanitary Pipe Network
    10. 15.10. The Bottom Line
  21. 16. Working the Land: Grading
    1. 16.1. Working with Grading Feature Lines
      1. 16.1.1. Accessing Grading Feature Line Tools
      2. 16.1.2. Creating Grading Feature Lines
      3. 16.1.3. Editing Feature Line Horizontal Information
      4. 16.1.4. Editing Feature Line Elevation Information
      5. 16.1.5. Stylizing and Labeling Feature Lines
        1. 16.1.5.1. Feature Line Styles
        2. 16.1.5.2. Feature Line Labels
    2. 16.2. Grading Objects
      1. 16.2.1. Defining Criteria Sets
      2. 16.2.2. Creating Gradings
      3. 16.2.3. Editing Gradings
      4. 16.2.4. Grading Styles
      5. 16.2.5. Creating Surfaces from Grading Groups
    3. 16.3. The Bottom Line
  22. 17. Sharing the Model: Data Shortcuts
    1. 17.1. What Are Data Shortcuts?
    2. 17.2. Publishing Data Shortcut Files
      1. 17.2.1. The Working and Data Shortcuts Folders
      2. 17.2.2. Creating Data Shortcuts
    3. 17.3. Using Data Shortcuts
      1. 17.3.1. Creating Shortcut References
      2. 17.3.2. Updating and Managing References
        1. 17.3.2.1. Updating the Source and Reference
        2. 17.3.2.2. Managing Changes in the Source Data
        3. 17.3.2.3. Fixing Broken Shortcuts
        4. 17.3.2.4. The Data Shortcuts Editor
    4. 17.4. The Bottom Line
  23. 18. Behind the Scenes: Autodesk Data Management Server
    1. 18.1. What Is Vault?
      1. 18.1.1. ADMS and Vault
      2. 18.1.2. ADMS and SQL
    2. 18.2. Installing ADMS
    3. 18.3. Managing ADMS
      1. 18.3.1. ADMS Console
        1. 18.3.1.1. Creating and Managing Vaults
        2. 18.3.1.2. Creating and Managing Users
        3. 18.3.1.3. Creating Groups
      2. 18.3.2. Accessing Vaults via Vault
    4. 18.4. Vault Management via Vault
      1. 18.4.1. Vault Options
      2. 18.4.2. Vault Administration and Working Folders
    5. 18.5. The Bottom Line
  24. 19. Teamwork: Vault Client and Civil 3D
    1. 19.1. Vault and Project Theory
      1. 19.1.1. Vault versus Data Shortcuts
      2. 19.1.2. Project Timing
      3. 19.1.3. Project Workflow with Vault and Civil 3D
      4. 19.1.4. Feedback from the Vault
    2. 19.2. Working in Vault
      1. 19.2.1. Preparing for Projects in Civil 3D
        1. 19.2.1.1. Establishing a Project Template
        2. 19.2.1.2. Creating a New Civil 3D Project
      2. 19.2.2. Populating Vault with Data
        1. 19.2.2.1. Vault Eligibility
        2. 19.2.2.2. Loading the Vault
          1. 19.2.2.2.1. Loading New Drawings
          2. 19.2.2.2.2. Loading Existing Drawings
      3. 19.2.3. Working with Vault Data References
        1. 19.2.3.1. Creating a Data Reference
        2. 19.2.3.2. Updating the Source
        3. 19.2.3.3. Updating the Reference
        4. 19.2.3.4. Breaking the Reference
      4. 19.2.4. Pulling It Together
        1. 19.2.4.1. Pulling the Needed References
        2. 19.2.4.2. Going Vertical with Design
        3. 19.2.4.3. Building a Road Model
        4. 19.2.4.4. Preparing the Sheets
    3. 19.3. Team Management in Vault
      1. 19.3.1. Vault Folder Permission
      2. 19.3.2. Restoring Previous Versions
    4. 19.4. The Bottom Line
  25. 20. Out the Door: Plan Production
    1. 20.1. Preparing for Plan Sets
    2. 20.2. Prerequisite Components
    3. 20.3. Using View Frames and Match Lines
      1. 20.3.1. The Create View Frames Wizard
        1. 20.3.1.1. Alignment Page
        2. 20.3.1.2. Sheets Page
        3. 20.3.1.3. View Frame Group Page
        4. 20.3.1.4. Match Lines Page
        5. 20.3.1.5. Profile Views Page
      2. 20.3.2. Creating View Frames
      3. 20.3.3. Editing View Frames and Match Lines
    4. 20.4. Creating Plan & Profile Sheets
      1. 20.4.1. The Create Sheets Wizard
        1. 20.4.1.1. View Frame Group and Layouts Page
        2. 20.4.1.2. Create Sheets Page
        3. 20.4.1.3. Profile Views Page
        4. 20.4.1.4. Data References Page
      2. 20.4.2. Managing Sheets
    5. 20.5. Creating Section Sheets
      1. 20.5.1. Creating Section View Groups
      2. 20.5.2. Creating Section Sheets
    6. 20.6. Supporting Components
      1. 20.6.1. Templates
      2. 20.6.2. Styles and Settings
    7. 20.7. The Bottom Line
  26. 21. Playing Nice with Others: LDT and LandXML
    1. 21.1. What Is LandXML?
    2. 21.2. Handling Inbound Data
      1. 21.2.1. Importing Land Desktop Data
      2. 21.2.2. Importing LandXML Data
    3. 21.3. Sharing the Model
      1. 21.3.1. Creating LandXML Files
      2. 21.3.2. Creating an AutoCAD Drawing
        1. 21.3.2.1. Object Enablers and Proxy Graphics
        2. 21.3.2.2. Stripping Custom Objects
    4. 21.4. The Bottom Line
  27. 22. Get The Picture: Visualization
    1. 22.1. AutoCAD 3D Modeling Workspace
      1. 22.1.1. Applying Different Visual Styles
      2. 22.1.2. Render Materials
    2. 22.2. Visualizing Civil 3D Objects
      1. 22.2.1. Applying a Visual Style
      2. 22.2.2. Visualizing a Surface
      3. 22.2.3. Visualizing a Corridor
      4. 22.2.4. Creating Code Set Styles
      5. 22.2.5. Visualizing a Pipe Network
      6. 22.2.6. Visualizing AutoCAD Objects
        1. 22.2.6.1. Solids
        2. 22.2.6.2. Blocks
        3. 22.2.6.3. Multiview Blocks
        4. 22.2.6.4. Moving Objects to Surfaces and Extracting Objects from Surfaces
      7. 22.2.7. Creating a 3D DWF from a Corridor Model
      8. 22.2.8. Creating a Quick Rendering from a Corridor Model
        1. 22.2.8.1. A Quick Rendering
        2. 22.2.8.2. Adjusting Lighting
    3. 22.3. The Bottom Line
  28. 23. Projecting the Cost: Quantity Takeoff
    1. 23.1. Inserting a Pay Item List and Categories
    2. 23.2. Keeping Tabs on the Model
      1. 23.2.1. AutoCAD Objects as Pay Items
      2. 23.2.2. Pricing Your Corridor
      3. 23.2.3. Pipes and Structures as Pay Items
        1. 23.2.3.1. Assigning Pay Items in the Parts List
        2. 23.2.3.2. Pay Items as Part Properties
      4. 23.2.4. Highlighting Pay Items
    3. 23.3. Inventory Your Pay Items
    4. 23.4. The Bottom Line
  29. A. The Bottom Line
    1. A.1. Chapter 1: Getting Dirty: The Basics of Civil 3D
    2. A.2. Chapter 2: Back to Basics: Lines and Curves
    3. A.3. Chapter 3: Lay of the Land: Survey
    4. A.4. Chapter 4: X Marks the Spot: Points
    5. A.5. Chapter 5: The Ground Up: Surfaces in Civil 3D
    6. A.6. Chapter 6: Don't Fence Me In: Parcels
    7. A.7. Chapter 7: Laying a Path: Alignments
    8. A.8. Chapter 8: Cut to the Chase: Profiles
    9. A.9. Chapter 9: Slice and Dice: Profile Views in Civil 3D
    10. A.10. Chapter 10: Templates Plus: Assemblies and Subassemblies
    11. A.11. Chapter 11: Easy Does It: Basic Corridors
    12. A.12. Chapter 12: The Road Ahead: Advanced Corridors
    13. A.13. Chapter 13: Stacking Up: Cross Sections
    14. A.14. Chapter 14: The Tool Chest: Parts Lists and Part Builder
    15. A.15. Chapter 15: Running Downhill: Pipe Networks
    16. A.16. Chapter 16: Working the Land: Grading
    17. A.17. Chapter 17: Sharing the Model: Data Shortcuts
    18. A.18. Chapter 18: Behind the Scenes: Autodesk Data Management Server
    19. A.19. Chapter 19: Teamwork: Vault Client and Civil 3D
    20. A.20. Chapter 20: Out the Door: Plan Production
    21. A.21. Chapter 21: Playing Nice with Others: LDT and LandXML
    22. A.22. Chapter 22: Get the Picture: Visualization
    23. A.23. Chapter 23: Projecting the Cost: Quantity Takeoff
  30. B. The Autodesk Certification Exams
    1. B.1. Civil 3D 2011 Exam Preparation Roadmap
      1. B.1.1. Assessment Tests
      2. B.1.2. ATC® Instructor-Led Courses
    2. B.2. Recommended Experience Levels for Civil 3D 2011 Certification Exams
      1. B.2.1. 2011 Certified Associate Exam
      2. B.2.2. 2011 Certified Professional Exam