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Managing Projects in Organizations: How to Make the Best Use of Time, Techniques, and People, 3rd Edition

Book Description

In this third edition of Managing Projects in Organizations, J. Davidson Frame updates and expands on his classic book to provide an accessible introduction to the field of project management. Drawing on more than twenty-five years of consulting and training experience, Frame's most current edition of his landmark book includes a wealth of new topics, including:

  • Managing virtual teams

  • The evolving concept of the project manager's role

  • Comanaged project teams

  • The project office

  • Project portfolios

  • Web-based project management

  • International project management

  • Table of Contents

    1. Cover Page
    2. Title Page
    3. Copyright
    4. Contents
    5. Dedication
    6. Preface
      1. INTENDED AUDIENCE
      2. PROJECT MANAGEMENT AS THE ACCIDENTAL PROFESSION
      3. MY EXPERIENCES
      4. CONTENTS OF THE BOOK
      5. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
    7. The Author
    8. INTRODUCTION: Understanding the Process of Managing Projects
      1. WHAT IS A PROJECT?
      2. WHAT IS PROJECT MANAGEMENT?
      3. THE PROJECT LIFE CYCLE
      4. PROJECT MANAGEMENT IN THE INFORMATION AGE
      5. KEY LESSONS TO LEARN
    9. PART ONE: The Project Context : People, Teams, and the Organization
      1. CHAPTER ONE: Operating Within the Realities of Organizational Life
        1. ORGANIZATIONAL REALITY: THE DIVORCE OF RESPONSIBILITY AND AUTHORITY
        2. NURTURING AUTHORITY
        3. THE FULL PROJECT ENVIRONMENT
        4. THE POLITICS OF PROJECTS
        5. CONCLUSION
      2. CHAPTER TWO: Finding and Working with Capable People
        1. GENERAL ISSUES
        2. WHO'S IN CHARGE HERE?
        3. PSYCHOLOGICAL TYPES
        4. THE PROJECT MANAGER
        5. CONCLUSION
      3. CHAPTER THREE: Structuring Project Teams and Building Cohesiveness
        1. CHARACTERISTICS OF PROJECT TEAMS
        2. TEAM EFFICIENCY
        3. STRUCTURING TEAMS
        4. AN EMERGING STRUCTURE FOR KNOWLEDGE-BASED PROJECTS
        5. CREATING TEAM IDENTITY
        6. CONCLUSION
    10. PART TWO: Project Customers and Project Requirements
      1. CHAPTER FOUR: Making Certain the Project Is Based on a Clear Need
        1. EVOLUTION OF NEEDS
        2. THE NEEDS-REQUIREMENTS LIFE CYCLE
        3. PITFALLS IN DEFINING NEEDS
        4. CONCLUSION
      2. CHAPTER FIVE: Specifying What the Project Should Accomplish
        1. THE NATURE OF REQUIREMENTS
        2. PROBLEMS WITH REQUIREMENTS
        3. THE FUNDAMENTAL TRADE-OFF IN SPECIFYING REQUIREMENTS
        4. GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR SPECIFYING REQUIREMENTS
        5. RAPID PROTOTYPING
        6. CONCLUSION
    11. PART THREE: Project Planning and Control
      1. CHAPTER SIX: Tools and Techniques for Keeping the Project on Course
        1. THE PROJECT PLAN
        2. PLANNING AND UNCERTAINTY
        3. PROJECT CONTROL
        4. HOW MUCH PLANNING AND CONTROL IS ENOUGH?
        5. PLANNING AND CONTROL TOOLS: THE SCHEDULE
        6. PLANNING AND CONTROL TOOLS: THE BUDGET
        7. PLANNING AND CONTROL TOOLS: HUMAN AND MATERIAL RESOURCES
        8. RESOURCE LEVELING
        9. GRAPHICAL CONTROL OF PROJECTS
        10. THE ACTION COMPONENT OF CONTROL
        11. PROJECT MANAGEMENT SOFTWARE
        12. CONCLUSION
      2. CHAPTER SEVEN: Managing Special Problems and Complex Projects
        1. PLANNING AND CONTROL ON LARGE PROJECTS
        2. PLANNING AND CONTROL FOR PROJECT PORTFOLIOS
        3. PLANNING AND CONTROL FOR CONTRACTED PROJECTS
        4. PLANNING AND CONTROL WITH BUREAUCRATIC MILESTONES
        5. ESTABLISHING AND RUNNING A PROJECT SUPPORT OFFICE
        6. VIRTUAL TEAMS
        7. CONCLUSION
      3. CHAPTER EIGHT: Achieving Results : Principles for Success as a Project Manager
        1. RUDIMENTARY PRINCIPLES
        2. THE LAST WORD
    12. References
    13. Index