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Manager Redefined: The Competitive Advantage in the Middle of Your Organization

Book Description

In this book the author explains that managers must build human capital and engender employee engagement by managing them almost not at all, by attending instead to the factors and circumstances that make them successful. In other words, managers must play their role from offstage and out of the limelight. Based on a survey of over 16,000 employees, the author presents Towers-Watson' management performance model: Executing tasks, Building relationships and performance capability, and Energizing change. Additionally, managers must create an atmosphere of authenticity and trust.

Table of Contents

  1. Copyright
  2. PREFACE
    1. A Few Words about Our Information Sources
    2. Acknowledgments
  3. I. Context
    1. 1. Do Managers Matter?
      1. 1.1. A Brief History of Management
      2. 1.2. Defining Management and Leadership
      3. 1.3. The Definition, and the Power, of Engagement
      4. 1.4. SUMMARY: THE MEANING OF THE MANAGER
    2. 2. Why Managers Have a Tough Job
      1. 2.1. Employees Are Smart and Demanding
      2. 2.2. We Have Ambivalent Feelings about Leadership and Followership
      3. 2.3. We Really Don't Like Being Told What to Do
      4. 2.4. Managers Behave Badly
      5. 2.5. SUMMARY: THE MANAGER PARADOX
    3. 3. A New Model of Manager Performance
      1. 3.1. Managers and Competitive Advantage
        1. 3.1.1. A Semiconductor Example
        2. 3.1.2. An Airline Example
        3. 3.1.3. A Software Example
      2. 3.2. The Manager Performance Model26
        1. 3.2.1. Executing Tasks
        2. 3.2.2. Developing People
        3. 3.2.3. Delivering the Deal
        4. 3.2.4. Energizing Change
        5. 3.2.5. The Foundation—Authenticity and Trust
      3. 3.3. SUMMARY: MANAGERIAL METAPHORS
    4. 4. Constructing the Manager Role
      1. 4.1. Manager Contribution—The Player-Coach Job
      2. 4.2. Manager Competency—The Technical Skill Dilemma
      3. 4.3. The Size of the Job—Span of Control
        1. 4.3.1. Because They Thought They Had To
        2. 4.3.2. Because They Thought They Should
        3. 4.3.3. The Truth about Spans
      4. 4.4. Building the Role System
      5. 4.5. SUMMARY: A BALANCING ACT
  4. II. Implementation
    1. 5. Executing Tasks
      1. 5.1. Planning Work
        1. 5.1.1. Develop Causal Maps
        2. 5.1.2. Analyze Results from a Reference Class of Projects
        3. 5.1.3. Engage in Counterfactual Thinking
      2. 5.2. Clarifying Job Roles
        1. 5.2.1. Customize Individual Jobs
        2. 5.2.2. Recognize Who Can, Should, and Wants to Do What
        3. 5.2.3. Make Teamwork Work
        4. 5.2.4. Carefully Catalyze Self-Managing Teams
      3. 5.3. Monitoring Progress
      4. 5.4. SUMMARY: MANAGER AS ETHNOGRAPHER
    2. 6. Developing People
      1. 6.1. Acting as a Human Capital Treasurer
        1. 6.1.1. Help Employees Formulate Career Plans and Choose the Best Learning Modes
        2. 6.1.2. Create a Constellation of Learning Contacts
        3. 6.1.3. Help People Travel Multidirectional Career Paths
      2. 6.2. Providing Direct Development
        1. 6.2.1. Coach Effectively
        2. 6.2.2. Believe in People's Ability to Develop
      3. 6.3. Goal Setting and Performance Feedback
        1. 6.3.1. Build Self-Efficacy Through FAMIC Goal Setting
        2. 6.3.2. Reinforce FAMIC Goals with FITEMA Performance Feedback
      4. 6.4. SUMMARY: BUILDING TOMORROW'S ASSETS
    3. 7. Delivering the Deal
      1. 7.1. Transforming the Extrinsic into the Intrinsic
      2. 7.2. Individualizing Rewards
      3. 7.3. Boosting Engagement Through Recognition
        1. 7.3.1. Inclusiveness Creates the Opportunity
        2. 7.3.2. Communication Defines the Context and Sets the Ground Rules
        3. 7.3.3. Trust Provides the Emotional Foundation
      4. 7.4. SUMMARY: MANAGERIAL ALCHEMY
    4. 8. Energizing Change
      1. 8.1. Coping with Imposed Change
        1. 8.1.1. Embrace Positive Change
        2. 8.1.2. Handle Adverse Change
          1. 8.1.2.1. Minimize Risk to the Deal
          2. 8.1.2.2. Build Human Capital to Support Change
          3. 8.1.2.3. Sharpen the Strategic Focus of Work
      2. 8.2. Choosing to Change
        1. 8.2.1. Enhance Individual Creativity
        2. 8.2.2. Build Adaptable Teams
      3. 8.3. Sustaining Engagement
        1. 8.3.1. Foster Well-Being
        2. 8.3.2. Ensure Performance Support
      4. 8.4. SUMMARY: MANAGING CHANGE
    5. 9. Authenticity and Trust
      1. 9.1. Connecting Authenticity and Trust
      2. 9.2. Building Trust Through Authenticity
        1. 9.2.1. Maintain Openness
        2. 9.2.2. Clarify and Focus Work
        3. 9.2.3. Display Scrupulous Fairness
      3. 9.3. Implications for Manager Performance
        1. 9.3.1. Executing Tasks
        2. 9.3.2. Developing People
        3. 9.3.3. Delivering the Deal
        4. 9.3.4. Energizing Change
      4. 9.4. SUMMARY: THE FABRIC OF AUTHENTICITY AND TRUST
    6. 10. Fitting the Pieces Together
      1. 10.1. Manager Role Structure and Performance Model—A Summary
      2. 10.2. What Makes a Great Manager?
        1. 10.2.1. Requisite Variety
        2. 10.2.2. Cognitive Fluidity
        3. 10.2.3. Ability to Catalyze Action
        4. 10.2.4. Ability to Navigate the Organization
        5. 10.2.5. Social Intelligence
      3. 10.3. Can a Good Manager Manage Anything?
      4. 10.4. Make Versus Buy
      5. 10.5. Notes for Those Who Want Managers to Succeed
        1. 10.5.1. What Executives Can Do
        2. 10.5.2. What Human Resources Can Do
  5. NOTES
    1. Preface
    2. Chapter One
    3. Chapter Two
    4. Chapter Three
    5. Chapter Four
    6. Chapter Five
    7. Chapter Six
    8. Chapter Seven
    9. Chapter Eight
    10. Chapter Nine
    11. Chapter Ten
  6. THE AUTHORS