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Making Things Move DIY Mechanisms for Inventors, Hobbyists, and Artists by Dustyn Roberts

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5Mechanical and Electrical Power, Work, and Energy

All things that move need some source of energy. This energy may be as simple as using the force of gravity to create movement (how apples fall from trees), or as complex as the internal combustion engine in a gas-powered car. A person can also supply power by cranking a handle or pedaling a bike. Our bodies turn the chemical energy from the food we eat into mechanical energy so we can walk, run, and jump. Motors turn electrical energy into mechanical energy so we can make things move and spin.

In this chapter, we’ll discuss how power, work, and energy are related, identify sources of power, and highlight some practical examples of putting these sources to work.

Mechanical Power

Mechanical ...

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