You are previewing Maintainable JavaScript.

Maintainable JavaScript

Cover of Maintainable JavaScript by Nicholas C. Zakas Published by O'Reilly Media, Inc.
  1. Maintainable JavaScript
  2. SPECIAL OFFER: Upgrade this ebook with O’Reilly
  3. Introduction
  4. Preface
    1. Conventions Used in This Book
    2. Using Code Examples
    3. Safari® Books Online
    4. How to Contact Us
  5. I. Style Guidelines
    1. 1. Basic Formatting
      1. Indentation Levels
      2. Statement Termination
      3. Line Length
      4. Line Breaking
      5. Blank Lines
      6. Naming
      7. Literal Values
    2. 2. Comments
      1. Single-Line Comments
      2. Multiline Comments
      3. Using Comments
      4. Documentation Comments
    3. 3. Statements and Expressions
      1. Brace Alignment
      2. Block Statement Spacing
      3. The switch Statement
      4. The with Statement
      5. The for Loop
      6. The for-in Loop
    4. 4. Variables, Functions, and Operators
      1. Variable Declarations
      2. Function Declarations
      3. Function Call Spacing
      4. Immediate Function Invocation
      5. Equality
      6. eval()
      7. Primitive Wrapper Types
  6. II. Programming Practices
    1. 5. Loose Coupling of UI Layers
      1. What Is Loose Coupling?
      2. Keep JavaScript Out of CSS
      3. Keep CSS Out of JavaScript
      4. Keep JavaScript Out of HTML
      5. Keep HTML Out of JavaScript
    2. 6. Avoid Globals
      1. The Problems with Globals
      2. Accidental Globals
      3. The One-Global Approach
      4. The Zero-Global Approach
    3. 7. Event Handling
      1. Classic Usage
      2. Rule #1: Separate Application Logic
      3. Rule #2: Don’t Pass the Event Object Around
    4. 8. Avoid Null Comparisons
      1. Detecting Primitive Values
      2. Detecting Reference Values
      3. Detecting Properties
    5. 9. Separate Configuration Data from Code
      1. What Is Configuration Data?
      2. Externalizing Configuration Data
      3. Storing Configuration Data
    6. 10. Throw Your Own Errors
      1. The Nature of Errors
      2. Throwing Errors in JavaScript
      3. Advantages of Throwing Errors
      4. When to Throw Errors
      5. The try-catch Statement
      6. Error Types
    7. 11. Don’t Modify Objects You Don’t Own
      1. What Do You Own?
      2. The Rules
      3. Better Approaches
      4. A Note on Polyfills
      5. Preventing Modification
    8. 12. Browser Detection
      1. User-Agent Detection
      2. Feature Detection
      3. Avoid Feature Inference
      4. Avoid Browser Inference
      5. What Should You Use?
  7. III. Automation
    1. 13. File and Directory Structure
      1. Best Practices
      2. Basic Layout
    2. 14. Ant
      1. Installation
      2. The Build File
      3. Running the Build
      4. Target Dependencies
      5. Properties
      6. Buildr
    3. 15. Validation
      1. Finding Files
      2. The Task
      3. Improving the Target
      4. Other Improvements
      5. Buildr Task
    4. 16. Concatenation and Baking
      1. The Task
      2. Line Endings
      3. Headers and Footers
      4. Baking Files
    5. 17. Minification and Compression
      1. Minification
      2. Compression
    6. 18. Documentation
      1. JSDoc Toolkit
      2. YUI Doc
    7. 19. Automated Testing
      1. YUI Test Selenium Driver
      2. Yeti
      3. PhantomJS
      4. JsTestDriver
    8. 20. Putting It Together
      1. Missing Pieces
      2. Planning the Build
      3. Using a CI System
  8. A. JavaScript Style Guide
    1. Indentation
    2. Line Length
    3. Primitive Literals
    4. Operator Spacing
    5. Parentheses Spacing
    6. Object Literals
    7. Comments
      1. Single-Line Comments
      2. Multiline Comments
      3. Comment Annotations
    8. Variable Declarations
    9. Function Declarations
    10. Naming
    11. Strict Mode
    12. Assignments
    13. Equality Operators
    14. Ternary Operator
    15. Statements
      1. Simple Statements
      2. return Statement
      3. Compound Statements
      4. if Statement
      5. for Statement
      6. while Statement
      7. do Statement
      8. switch Statement
      9. try Statement
    16. White Space
    17. Things to Avoid
  9. B. JavaScript Tools
    1. Build Tools
    2. Documentation Generators
    3. Linting Tools
    4. Minification Tools
    5. Testing Tools
  10. Index
  11. About the Author
  12. Colophon
  13. SPECIAL OFFER: Upgrade this ebook with O’Reilly
  14. Copyright
O'Reilly logo

Chapter 19. Automated Testing

Testing JavaScript has long been a pain point for developers. You want to test JavaScript quickly and easily, but there are so many browsers to test. The first solution was manual testing across all browsers, which meant creating an HTML file and manually loading it in various browsers to ensure that it worked. Though functional, this approach was too slow for practical use.

The next wave of JavaScript testing focused on command-line testing by stubbing out the browser environment. Several attempts were made to get JavaScript testing on the command line using Rhino and a fake browser environment. Some companies even developed browser profiles that could be loaded in with the promise of cross-browser testing. The unfortunate reality was that these stubbed browser environments didn’t do the job. Trying to recreate a truly unique environment by hand led to inconsistencies: your tests might pass in the “fake Firefox” but fail in the actual browser.

More recently, attempts have been made to use the actual browsers for testing. This approach typically involves using an HTML file to launch tests and then having an application load that file in the different browsers. Many of the tools mentioned in this chapter are still under development, but they all give you a good starting point for integrating browser-based JavaScript testing.

YUI Test Selenium Driver

YUI Test is the unit testing framework for the YUI Library. The most recent version of YUI Test is more than ...

The best content for your career. Discover unlimited learning on demand for around $1/day.