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Mac OS X Hacks by Rael Dornfest, Kevin Hemenway

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Exchanging a File via Bluetooth

Mac OS X 10.2’s built-in support for Bluetooth wireless data means you have yet another way to exchange data with another Macintosh, PC, or mobile device.

If you’re using WiFi (802.11b) wireless access, chances are you discovered it through Apple’s fabulous AirPort base station and AirPort-enabled iBooks and TiBooks. The same is about to happen to an oft-dismissed technology called Bluetooth. Originally billed as a cable-replacement technology, Bluetooth is taking off as the standard for low-range, reasonable-speed, small-footprint connectivity between computers, PDAs [Hack #32], cell phones [Hack #31], modems [Hack #77], cameras — any device with data to share.

Mac OS X 10.2 bakes Bluetooth (http://www.apple.com/bluetooth/) support right in, requiring only an inexpensive external USB dongle; in fact, by the time you read this, your iBook might just have Bluetooth onboard. Turn it on and you have yet another way to exchange your files with another Macintosh, PC, or other device.

The Bluetooth File Exchange application (Application Utilities Bluetooth File Exchange) is a drag-and-drop interface for sending and receiving files via Bluetooth.

Sending a File

To send a file to another machine using Bluetooth, simply drag and drop it onto the Bluetooth File Exchange icon, as shown in Figure 6-37.

Drop and send a file via Bluetooth File Exchange

Figure 6-37. Drop and send a file via Bluetooth ...

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