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Mac® Bible by Dwight Spivey

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Chapter 3. Finder Fun

Now that you and the Finder are a bit more acquainted, I want to show you some fun, neat ways to make the Finder even more useful.

Mac OS X has always included beautiful graphics, but Apple has been mindful that the gorgeous interface of Mac OS X wasn't just eye candy, but functional as well. This chapter explores some of these great-looking yet functional and easy to use tools: the Dock, Dashboard, Exposé, and Spaces.

Mastering the Dock

The Dock, shown in Figure 3.1, is the row of icons that sits at the bottom of your Mac's screen by default. The Dock has been a part of Mac OS X since its first version, Cheetah (10.0), and has seen many revisions leading up to its current state in Mac OS X 10.5, or Leopard. The Dock is the perfect place to store icons for your favorite applications, making it easy to open the application with just one click without having to navigate your hard drive to find it. Apple has preloaded the Dock with application icons, but you can rearrange and even remove the icons you don't need, and you can add icons you do need.

The Dock isn't limited to just application icons; it can also contain shortcuts to folders that reside on your hard drive—for instance, the Documents folder in your home directory.

The Dock is one of the most widely used elements of the Mac OS X interface.

Figure 3.1. The Dock is one of the ...

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