O'Reilly logo

Linux Server Hacks by Rob Flickenger

Stay ahead with the world's most comprehensive technology and business learning platform.

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required

Chapter 4. Networking

Hacks #45-53

There was once a time when a network admin was a person who spent all of his time trying to figure out how to make machines talk to each other over a network. It seems that lately, much of a network admin's time is spent trying to figure out how to restrict access to their machines via the network, thus keeping out the undesirables while still allowing legitimate traffic to pass through.

Fortunately, the netfilter firewall in Linux provides a very flexible interface to the kernel's networking decisions. Using the iptables command, you can create firewall rules that let you create a rich and very flexible access policy. It can not only match packets based on port, interface and MAC addresses, but also on data contained within the packet and even by the rate that packets are received. This information can be used to help weed out all sorts of attempted attacks, from port floods to virii.

But locking users out isn't nearly as much fun as connecting users together. After all the whole point of a computer network is to allow people to communicate with each other! We'll take a look at some more unusual methods for controlling the flow of network traffic, from the remote port forwarding to various forms of IP tunnelling. By the time we've explored IP encapsulation and user space tunnels like vtun, we'll see how it is possible to build networks on top of the Internet that behave in all sorts of unexpected and surprisingly useful ways.

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, interactive tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required