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Linux® Desk Reference, Second Edition

Book Description

  • Completely updated with hundreds of new examples!

  • The only Linux reference with examples for every command

  • All-new chapters on the Apache Web server, tc shell, and Emacs editor

  • Organized by task, so you can find it fast!

The practical, handy desk reference for every Linux user—now completely updated!

Linux Desk Reference, Second Edition packs information about every command Linux users need—organized for maximum value and convenience. Scott Hawkins has updated entries throughout the book, and added four new chapters—including all-new coverage of the tc shell, Emacs editor, and Apache Web server.

This friendly reference is organized by task so you can find what you need even if you don't know what it's called! Unlike other Linux references, this one delivers practical examples for every command it contains—plus hundreds of invaluable tips, warnings, diagrams, and sample outputs. And if you're a Linux expert, you'll love the "roadmap-style" alphabetical fast-find reference section!

No matter what you need to know about Linux, it's here...

  • Files and the filesystem

  • Sessions, users, and groups

  • Networking

  • I/O, devices, and disks

  • Apache Web services

  • Windows connectivity

  • Security

  • X Window System

  • Printers and print queues

  • Text editors-including vi and Emacs

  • The Linux kernel

  • Scripting

  • Email

  • Comparing and merging files

  • Scheduling

  • Archiving and compression

  • Performance monitoring

  • Startup/shutdown

  • Daemons

  • Shells-including bash and tc

  • Pattern matching

  • Processes

  • Diagnostics

  • Tuning

  • NIS/NFS

  • Development resources

  • And more!

Whether you're a sysadmin, developer, power user, or newbie, get the most convenient, up-to-date Linux reference you can buy: Linux Desk Reference, Second Edition!

Praise for the first edition

"Hawkins provides a superior combination of explanations, descriptions, and examples. Every Linux user, whether novice or experienced administrator, will value the organization and contents of the Linux Desk Reference."

SysAdmin magazine (Sept. 2000)

Table of Contents

  1. Copyright
    1. Dedication
  2. Acknowledgments
  3. Introduction
    1. How to Use This Book
    2. Conventions of This Book
  4. Documentation
    1. Introduction
    2. Related Files
    3. Commands
  5. System Structures
    1. Files
      1. Introduction
      2. Related Files
      3. Commands
    2. Process
      1. Introduction
      2. Related Files
      3. Commands
    3. Standard Input, Output, and Error
      1. Introduction
      2. Commands
    4. Directories
      1. Introduction
      2. Related Files
      3. Commands
    5. Users
      1. Introduction
      2. Related Files
      3. Commands
      4. Changing Defaults
    6. Paths
      1. Introduction
      2. Commands
    7. The Bash Shell
      1. Introduction
      2. Quick Overview of Shell Operation
      3. Topics Covered
      4. Related Files
      5. Commands
    8. The TC Shell
      1. Introduction
      2. Topics
      3. Command History
      4. Filename Substitution
      5. The Directory Stack
      6. Process Control
      7. Scheduled Execution
      8. Aliases
      9. Shell Programming
      10. Terminal Control
      11. Miscellaneous Commands
    9. Terminal and Keyboard
      1. Introduction
      2. Related Files
      3. Commands
    10. Disks
      1. Introduction
      2. Related Files
      3. Commands
    11. Filesystems
      1. Introduction
      2. Related Files
      3. Commands
    12. Printers and Print Queues
      1. Introduction
      2. The Print Process
      3. Related Files
      4. Commands
    13. Daemons
      1. Introduction
      2. Related Files
      3. Commands
    14. Machine Information
      1. Introduction
      2. Related Files
      3. Commands
    15. Kernel
      1. Introduction
      2. Related Files
      3. Commands
  6. Manipulating Data and Text Files
    1. Displaying Files
      1. Introduction
      2. Commands
    2. Comparing and Merging Files
      1. Introduction
      2. Commands
    3. Data Files
      1. Introduction
      2. Commands
    4. Document Formatting
      1. Introduction
      2. Document Formatting with Tex
      3. Related Files
      4. Commands
    5. The vi Editor
      1. Introduction
      2. Modes of Operation
      3. Line Ranges
      4. Related Files
      5. Sections
    6. Emacs
      1. Introduction
    7. Archiving and Compression
      1. Introduction
      2. Backup Levels
      3. Related Files
      4. Commands
  7. Common Tasks
    1. Startup and Shutdown
      1. Introduction
      2. Startup
      3. Shutdown
      4. Related Files
      5. Commands
    2. X Window System
      1. Introduction
      2. Related Files
      3. Commands
    3. Scheduling
      1. Introduction
      2. Related Files
      3. Commands
    4. Finding Stuff
      1. Introduction
      2. Regular Expressions
      3. Related Files
      4. Commands
    5. Diagnostics and System Performance
      1. Introduction
      2. Related Files
      3. Commands
    6. Security
      1. Introduction
      2. Related Files
      3. Commands
    7. Miscellaneous
      1. Introduction
      2. Related Files
      3. Commands
  8. Networking
    1. TCP/IP
      1. Introduction
      2. Related Files
      3. Commands
    2. Networking Applications
      1. Introduction
      2. Related Files
      3. Commands
    3. NIS and NFS
      1. Introduction
      2. NIS
      3. NFS
      4. Related Files
      5. Commands
    4. DOS and Windows Connectivity
      1. Introduction
      2. Related Files
      3. Commands
    5. Mail and Other Communication
      1. Introduction
      2. Related Files
      3. Commands
    6. Apache
      1. Introduction
      2. Related Files
      3. Commands
      4. Common Directives
      5. Virtual Hosting by Name
    7. Software Development Tools
      1. Introduction
      2. Tools
    8. Glossary
  9. Index