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Linux All-in-One For Dummies, 5th Edition by Emmett Dulaney

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Chapter 2

Managing Users and Groups

In This Chapter

arrow Managing a user account with a GUI user manager and commands

arrow Understanding the password file

arrow Managing your groups

arrow Working in the user environment

arrow Changing user and group ownerships of files and directories

Linux is a multiuser system, so it has many user accounts. Even if you’re the only user on your system, there will be a whole host of system user accounts. These aren’t for people. They’re just for running specific programs; many servers require a unique username and group name. For example, the FTP server runs under the username ftp.

User accounts can belong to one or more groups. Typically, each username has a corresponding private group name. By default, each user belongs to that corresponding private group. However, you can define other groups for the purpose of providing access to specific files and directories based on group membership.

User and group ownerships of files are a way to make sure that only the right people ...

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