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Linux All-in-One For Dummies, 5th Edition by Emmett Dulaney

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Chapter 6

Managing DNS

In This Chapter

arrow Understanding DNS

arrow Exploring BIND

arrow Finding out how to configure DNS

arrow Setting up a caching name server

arrow Configuring a primary name server

Domain Name System (DNS) is an Internet service that converts a fully qualified domain name, such as www.debian.org, into its corresponding IP address, such as 194.109.137.218. You can think of DNS as the directory of Internet hosts — DNS is the reason why you can use easy-to-remember hostnames even though TCP/IP requires numeric IP addresses for data transfers. DNS is basically a hierarchy of distributed DNS servers. This chapter provides an overview of DNS and shows you how to set up a caching DNS server on your Linux system.

Understanding Domain Name System (DNS)

In TCP/IP networks, each network interface (for example, an Ethernet card or a dial-up modem connection) is identified by an IP address. Because IP addresses are hard to remember, an easy-to-remember name is assigned to the IP address — much like the ...

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