You are previewing Learning Ruby.

Learning Ruby

Cover of Learning Ruby by Michael Fitzgerald Published by O'Reilly Media, Inc.
  1. Learning Ruby
    1. SPECIAL OFFER: Upgrade this ebook with O’Reilly
    2. A Note Regarding Supplemental Files
    3. Preface
      1. Who Should Read This Book?
      2. How This Book Works
      3. About the Examples
      4. How This Book Is Organized
      5. Conventions Used in This Book
      6. Comments and Questions
      7. Safari® Enabled
      8. Acknowledgments
    4. 1. Ruby Basics
      1. Hello, Matz
      2. Interactive Ruby
      3. Resources
      4. Installing Ruby
      5. Permission Denied
      6. Associating File Types on Windows
      7. Review Questions
    5. 2. A Quick Tour of Ruby
      1. Ruby Is Object-Oriented
      2. Ruby's Reserved Words
      3. Comments
      4. Variables
      5. Strings
      6. Numbers and Operators
      7. Conditional Statements
      8. Arrays and Hashes
      9. Methods
      10. Blocks
      11. Symbols
      12. Exception Handling
      13. Ruby Documentation
      14. Review Questions
    6. 3. Conditional Love
      1. The if Statement
      2. The case Statement
      3. The while Loop
      4. The loop Method
      5. The for loop
      6. Execution Before or After a Program
      7. Review Questions
    7. 4. Strings
      1. Creating Strings
      2. Concatenating Strings
      3. Accessing Strings
      4. Comparing Strings
      5. Manipulating Strings
      6. Case Conversion
      7. Managing Whitespace, etc.
      8. Incrementing Strings
      9. Converting Strings
      10. Regular Expressions
      11. 1.9 and Beyond
      12. Review Questions
    8. 5. Math
      1. Class Hierarchy and Included Modules
      2. Converting Numbers
      3. Basic Math Operations
      4. Ranges
      5. Inquiring About Numbers
      6. More Math Methods
      7. Math Functions
      8. Rational Numbers
      9. Prime Numbers
      10. Review Questions
    9. 6. Arrays
      1. Creating Arrays
      2. Accessing Elements
      3. Concatenation
      4. Set Operations
      5. Unique Elements
      6. Blow Your Stack
      7. Comparing Arrays
      8. Changing Elements
      9. Deleting Elements
      10. Arrays and Blocks
      11. Sorting Things and About Face
      12. Multidimensional Arrays
      13. 1.9 and Beyond
      14. Other Array Methods
      15. Review Questions
    10. 7. Hashes
      1. Creating Hashes
      2. Accessing Hashes
      3. Iterating over Hashes
      4. Changing Hashes
      5. Converting Hashes to Other Classes
      6. 1.9 and Beyond
      7. Other Hash Methods
      8. Review Questions
    11. 8. Working with Files
      1. Directories
      2. Creating a New File
      3. Opening an Existing File
      4. Deleting and Renaming Files
      5. File Inquiries
      6. Changing File Modes and Owner
      7. The IO Class
      8. Review Questions
    12. 9. Classes
      1. Defining the Class
      2. Instance Variables
      3. Accessors
      4. Class Variables
      5. Class Methods
      6. Inheritance
      7. Modules
      8. public, private, or protected
      9. Review Questions
    13. 10. More Fun with Ruby
      1. Formatting Output with sprintf
      2. Processing XML
      3. Date and Time
      4. Reflection
      5. Using Tk
      6. Metaprogramming
      7. RubyGems
      8. Exception Handling
      9. Creating Documentation with RDoc
      10. Embedded Ruby
      11. Review Questions
    14. 11. A Short Guide to Ruby on Rails
      1. Where Did Rails Come From
      2. Why Rails?
      3. What Have Other Folks Done with Rails?
      4. Hosting Rails
      5. Installing Rails
      6. Learning Rails
      7. A Brief Tutorial
      8. Review Questions
    15. A. Ruby Reference
      1. Ruby Interpreter
      2. Ruby's Reserved Words
      3. Operators
      4. Escape Characters
      5. Predefined Variables
      6. Global Constants
      7. Regular Expressions
      8. String Unpack Directives
      9. Array Pack Directives
      10. Sprintf Flags and Field Types
      11. File Tests
      12. Time Formatting Directives
      13. RDoc Options
      14. Rake
    16. B. Answers to Review Questions
      1. Chapter 1 Review Questions
      2. Chapter 2 Review Questions
      3. Chapter 3 Review Questions
      4. Chapter 4 Review Questions
      5. Chapter 5 Review Questions
      6. Chapter 6 Review Questions
      7. Chapter 7 Review Questions
      8. Chapter 8 Review Questions
      9. Chapter 9 Review Questions
      10. Chapter 10 Review Questions
      11. Chapter 11 Review Questions
    17. Glossary
    18. Index
    19. About the Author
    20. Colophon
    21. SPECIAL OFFER: Upgrade this ebook with O’Reilly
O'Reilly logo

Blocks

A block in Ruby is more than just a code block or group of statements. In a certain context, a block has a special meaning. This kind of block is always invoked in conjunction with a method, as you will see. In fact, it is referred to as a nameless function.

A block in Ruby is often (but not always) an idiom for getting all the values out of a data structure by iterating over the structure. It sort of means, "give me everything you've got in there, one at a time." I'll show you a common use of the block.

Remember the array pacific? Here it is again:

pacific = [ "Washington", "Oregon", "California" ]

You can call a block on pacific to retrieve all of its elements, one at a time, with the each method. Here is one way to do it:

pacific.each do |element|
 puts element
end

The name between the pipe characters (|element|) can be any name you want. The block uses it as a local variable to keep track of every element in the array, and later uses it to do something with the element. This block uses puts to print each element in the array:

Washington
Oregon
California

You can replace do/end with a pair of braces, as is commonly done, to make things a bit tighter (by the way, braces actually have a higher precedence than do/end):

pacific.each { |e| puts e }

Many dozens of classes have each methods in them, such as Array, Hash, and String. But don't get the wrong idea. Iterating over data structures isn't the only way to use blocks. Let me give you a simple example using yield, a Ruby keyword. ...

The best content for your career. Discover unlimited learning on demand for around $1/day.