You are previewing Learning iPhone Programming.

Learning iPhone Programming

Cover of Learning iPhone Programming by Alasdair Allan Published by O'Reilly Media, Inc.
  1. Learning iPhone Programming
    1. SPECIAL OFFER: Upgrade this ebook with O’Reilly
    2. A Note Regarding Supplemental Files
    3. Preface
      1. Who Should Read This Book?
      2. What Should You Already Know?
      3. What Will You Learn?
      4. What’s in This Book?
      5. Conventions Used in This Book
      6. Using Code Examples
      7. How to Contact Us
      8. Safari® Books Online
      9. Acknowledgments
    4. 1. Why Go Native?
      1. The Pros and Cons
      2. The Release Cycle
      3. Build It and They Will Come
    5. 2. Becoming a Developer
      1. Registering As an iPhone Developer
      2. Enrolling in the iPhone Developer Program
      3. The Apple Developer Connection
      4. Installing the iPhone SDK
      5. Preparing Your iPhone or iPod touch
    6. 3. Your First iPhone App
      1. Objective-C Basics
      2. Creating a Project
    7. 4. Coding in Objective-C
      1. Declaring and Defining Classes
      2. Memory Management
      3. Fundamental iPhone Design Patterns
      4. Conclusion
    8. 5. Table-View-Based Applications
      1. Simplifying the Template Classes
      2. Creating a Table View
      3. Building a Model
      4. Connecting the Controller to the Model
      5. Adding Navigation Controls to the Application
      6. Adding a City View
      7. Edit Mode
    9. 6. Other View Controllers
      1. Utility Applications
      2. Tab Bar Applications
      3. Modal View Controllers
      4. The Image Picker View Controller
    10. 7. Connecting to the Network
      1. Detecting Network Status
      2. Embedding a Web Browser in Your App
      3. Sending Email
      4. Getting Data from the Internet
    11. 8. Handling Data
      1. Data Entry
      2. Parsing XML
      3. Parsing JSON
      4. Regular Expressions
      5. Storing Data
    12. 9. Distributing Your Application
      1. Adding Missing Features
      2. Building and Signing
      3. Submitting to the App Store
      4. Reasons for Rejection
    13. 10. Using Sensors
      1. Hardware Support
      2. Using the Camera
      3. The Core Location Framework
      4. Using the Accelerometer
      5. Using the Digital Compass
      6. Accessing the Proximity Sensor
      7. Using Vibration
    14. 11. Geolocation and Mapping
      1. User Location
      2. Annotating Maps
    15. 12. Integrating Your Application
      1. Application Preferences
      2. Custom URL Schemes
      3. Media Playback
      4. Using the Address Book
    16. 13. Other Native Platforms
      1. PhoneGap
      2. MonoTouch
    17. 14. Going Further
      1. Cocoa and Objective-C
      2. Web Applications
      3. Core Data
      4. Push Notifications
      5. In-App Purchase
      6. Core Animation
      7. Game Kit
      8. Writing Games
      9. Look and Feel
      10. Hardware Accessories
    18. Index
    19. About the Author
    20. Colophon
    21. SPECIAL OFFER: Upgrade this ebook with O’Reilly
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Chapter 13. Other Native Platforms

If you want to build applications for the iPhone and the iPod touch that will be sold on the App Store, alternatives are available to the traditional Objective-C and Cocoa Touch route. Development platforms now exist allowing JavaScript and C# developers to get direct access to the iPhone’s hardware features, such as the accelerometer.

PhoneGap

PhoneGap, developed by Nitobi, is an open source development platform for building cross-platform mobile applications with JavaScript.

On the iPhone, it works by providing a prebuilt library containing Objective-C classes that wrap the iPhone’s native capabilities (e.g., vibration and accelerometer support) and exposes these capabilities to JavaScript along with an Xcode project template that makes use of the library. You can then compile your application as a hybrid of native Objective-C and JavaScript inside Xcode.

The platform is device-agnostic, allowing you to build an application for the iPhone, Android, and BlackBerry devices simultaneously. Developing applications using the PhoneGap framework is a reasonable alternative to building all-native applications in Objective-C.

In the past, submitting to the App Store applications built around the PhoneGap platform was problematic. However, since the 0.8.0 release, this has been resolved and Apple has approved PhoneGap for building applications intended for the store.

Note

Since the 0.8.0 release, the PhoneGap platform has embedded a version tag into the compiled ...

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