Cover by Alasdair Allan

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Annotating Maps

Like we did for the UIWebView in Chapter 7, here we’re going to build some code that you’ll be able to reuse in your own applications later. We’re going to build a view controller that we can display modally, and which will display an MKMapView annotated with a marker pin and can then be dismissed, returning us to our application.

We can reuse the Prototype application code we built in Chapter 7, which I used to demonstrate how to use the web and mail composer views. Open the Finder and navigate to the location where you saved the Prototype project. Right-click on the folder containing the project files and select Duplicate; a folder called Prototype copy will be created containing a duplicate of our project. Rename the folder Prototype3, and just as we did when we rebuilt the Prototype application to demonstrate the mail composer, prune the application down to the stub with the Go! button and associated pushedGo: method we can use to trigger the display of our map view (see Sending Email in Chapter 7 for details).

Now, right-click on the Classes group in the Groups & Files pane, select AddNew File, and select Cocoa Touch Class from the iPhone section. Create a UIViewController subclass, leaving the “With XIB for user interface” checkbox ticked. Name the new class “MapViewController” when prompted.

Note

At this point, I normally rename the NIB file that Xcode automatically created, removing the “Controller” part of the filename and leaving it as MapView.xib, as I feel ...

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