Cover by Alasdair Allan

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Building and Signing

The certificates we generated in Chapter 2 were intended only for development. If you want to distribute your application to end users, you’ll need to return to the Developer Portal, generate a different set of profiles, and rebuild your application, signing it this time with your new distribution profile rather than the development profile you have used thus far.

Note

The different provisioning profiles are used for different purposes. The development profile you generated in Chapter 2 is intended for development and your own devices. The ad hoc distribution profile is intended for alpha and beta testing, while the App Store distribution profile is intended for distributing your final build to the iTunes App Store.

Ad Hoc Distribution

Ad hoc builds of your application are used to distribute your application outside your own development environment, and are intended to allow you to distribute your application to beta testers. In the same way you registered your iPhone or iPod touch for development, you must register all of the devices onto which you intend to distribute your application using an ad hoc build. You can register up to 100 devices per year in the iPhone Program Portal. This is a firm limit; deleting already registered devices will not allow you to add further devices.

Note

Normally when you distribute applications via the ad hoc method, no application artwork is displayed when the user looks at your application inside the iTunes interface. However, if ...

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