You are previewing Learning iPhone Programming.

Learning iPhone Programming

Cover of Learning iPhone Programming by Alasdair Allan Published by O'Reilly Media, Inc.
  1. Learning iPhone Programming
    1. SPECIAL OFFER: Upgrade this ebook with O’Reilly
    2. A Note Regarding Supplemental Files
    3. Preface
      1. Who Should Read This Book?
      2. What Should You Already Know?
      3. What Will You Learn?
      4. What’s in This Book?
      5. Conventions Used in This Book
      6. Using Code Examples
      7. How to Contact Us
      8. Safari® Books Online
      9. Acknowledgments
    4. 1. Why Go Native?
      1. The Pros and Cons
      2. The Release Cycle
      3. Build It and They Will Come
    5. 2. Becoming a Developer
      1. Registering As an iPhone Developer
      2. Enrolling in the iPhone Developer Program
      3. The Apple Developer Connection
      4. Installing the iPhone SDK
      5. Preparing Your iPhone or iPod touch
    6. 3. Your First iPhone App
      1. Objective-C Basics
      2. Creating a Project
    7. 4. Coding in Objective-C
      1. Declaring and Defining Classes
      2. Memory Management
      3. Fundamental iPhone Design Patterns
      4. Conclusion
    8. 5. Table-View-Based Applications
      1. Simplifying the Template Classes
      2. Creating a Table View
      3. Building a Model
      4. Connecting the Controller to the Model
      5. Adding Navigation Controls to the Application
      6. Adding a City View
      7. Edit Mode
    9. 6. Other View Controllers
      1. Utility Applications
      2. Tab Bar Applications
      3. Modal View Controllers
      4. The Image Picker View Controller
    10. 7. Connecting to the Network
      1. Detecting Network Status
      2. Embedding a Web Browser in Your App
      3. Sending Email
      4. Getting Data from the Internet
    11. 8. Handling Data
      1. Data Entry
      2. Parsing XML
      3. Parsing JSON
      4. Regular Expressions
      5. Storing Data
    12. 9. Distributing Your Application
      1. Adding Missing Features
      2. Building and Signing
      3. Submitting to the App Store
      4. Reasons for Rejection
    13. 10. Using Sensors
      1. Hardware Support
      2. Using the Camera
      3. The Core Location Framework
      4. Using the Accelerometer
      5. Using the Digital Compass
      6. Accessing the Proximity Sensor
      7. Using Vibration
    14. 11. Geolocation and Mapping
      1. User Location
      2. Annotating Maps
    15. 12. Integrating Your Application
      1. Application Preferences
      2. Custom URL Schemes
      3. Media Playback
      4. Using the Address Book
    16. 13. Other Native Platforms
      1. PhoneGap
      2. MonoTouch
    17. 14. Going Further
      1. Cocoa and Objective-C
      2. Web Applications
      3. Core Data
      4. Push Notifications
      5. In-App Purchase
      6. Core Animation
      7. Game Kit
      8. Writing Games
      9. Look and Feel
      10. Hardware Accessories
    18. Index
    19. About the Author
    20. Colophon
    21. SPECIAL OFFER: Upgrade this ebook with O’Reilly
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Creating a Project

Now let’s create our first application in Xcode. Launch Xcode by double-clicking its icon (it’s located in the /Developer/Applications folder on your hard drive). Click “Create a new Xcode project” in the Xcode welcome window, and then click Application under the iPhone OS section on the left side of the screen. Next, click the View-based Application template and click Choose. When prompted, name your new project HelloWorld. Make sure you don’t put a space between Hello and World, as this can sometimes confuse Xcode.

Note

If you don’t see a welcome window when you start up Xcode, you can create a new project by choosing FileNew Project.

Xcode will now open a project window. The left pane shows the classes and other files associated with the project, organized into groups. If you double-click on each group icon, the group will expand to show you the files it contains, as shown in Figure 3-1. The application template you choose determines how the groups are arranged, but you can move the files around and create your own groups if you prefer to organize things differently. The two main groups you’ll be working with are Classes, which contain all the classes that make up the application, and Resources, which contain other supporting files, including the .xib files that the Interface Builder application uses to describe your application’s UI. By default, the project will open to the top level of the project hierarchy, and the top-right pane will show a list of all the ...

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