You are previewing Learning Android.

Learning Android

Cover of Learning Android by Marko Gargenta Published by O'Reilly Media, Inc.
  1. Learning Android
    1. SPECIAL OFFER: Upgrade this ebook with O’Reilly
    2. A Note Regarding Supplemental Files
    3. Preface
      1. What’s Inside
      2. Conventions Used in This Book
      3. Using Code Examples
      4. Safari® Books Online
      5. How to Contact Us
      6. Acknowledgments
    4. 1. Android Overview
      1. Android Overview
      2. History
      3. Android Versions
      4. Summary
    5. 2. The Stack
      1. Stack Overview
      2. Linux
      3. Native Libraries
      4. Dalvik
      5. Application Framework
      6. Applications
      7. Summary
    6. 3. Quick Start
      1. Installing the Android SDK
      2. Hello, World
      3. The Emulator
      4. Summary
    7. 4. Main Building Blocks
      1. What Are Main Building Blocks?
      2. A Real-World Example
      3. Activities
      4. Intents
      5. Services
      6. Content Providers
      7. Broadcast Receivers
      8. Application Context
      9. Summary
    8. 5. Yamba Project Overview
      1. The Yamba Application
      2. Design Philosophy
      3. Project Design
      4. Part 1: Android User Interface
      5. Part 2: Preferences, Filesystem, Options Menu, and Intents
      6. Part 3: Android Services
      7. Part 4: Working with Databases
      8. Part 5: Lists and Adapters
      9. Part 6: Broadcast Receivers
      10. Part 7: Content Providers
      11. Part 8: System Services
      12. Summary
    9. 6. Android User Interface
      1. Two Ways to Create a User Interface
      2. Views and Layouts
      3. Starting the Yamba Project
      4. The StatusActivity Layout
      5. The StatusActivity Java Class
      6. Logging in Android
      7. Threading in Android
      8. Other UI Events
      9. Adding Color and Graphics
      10. Alternative Resources
      11. Optimizing the User Interface
      12. Summary
    10. 7. Preferences, the Filesystem, the Options Menu, and Intents
      1. Preferences
      2. The Options Menu
      3. Shared Preferences
      4. The Filesystem Explained
      5. Summary
    11. 8. Services
      1. The Yamba Application Object
      2. UpdaterService
      3. Looping in the Service
      4. Pulling Data from Twitter
      5. Summary
    12. 9. The Database
      1. About SQLite
      2. DbHelper
      3. First Example
      4. Update UpdaterService
      5. Refactoring Status Data
      6. Summary
    13. 10. Lists and Adapters
      1. TimelineActivity
      2. Basic TimelineActivity Layout
      3. About Adapters
      4. TimelineAdapter
      5. ViewBinder: A Better Alternative to TimelineAdapter
      6. Updating the Manifest File
      7. Base Activity
      8. Summary
    14. 11. Broadcast Receivers
      1. About Broadcast Receivers
      2. BootReceiver
      3. The TimelineReceiver
      4. Broadcasting Intents
      5. The Network Receiver
      6. Adding Custom Permissions to Send and Receive Broadcasts
      7. Summary
    15. 12. Content Providers
      1. Creating a Content Provider
      2. Using Content Providers Through Widgets
      3. Summary
    16. 13. System Services
      1. Compass Demo
      2. Location Service
      3. Updating Yamba to Use the Location Service
      4. Intent Service
      5. Sending Notifications
      6. Summary
    17. 14. The Android Interface Definition Language
      1. Implementing the Remote Service
      2. Implementing the Remote Client
      3. Summary
    18. 15. The Native Development Kit (NDK)
      1. What Is and Isn’t the NDK For?
      2. Problems Solved by the NDK
      3. An NDK Example: Fibonacci
      4. Summary
    19. Index
    20. About the Author
    21. Colophon
    22. SPECIAL OFFER: Upgrade this ebook with O’Reilly
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Implementing the Remote Client

Now that we have the remote service, we are going to create a client that connects to that service to test that it all works well. Note that in this example we purposely separated the client and the server into two separate projects with different Java packages altogether, in order to demonstrate how they are separate apps.

So we’re going to create a new Android project in Eclipse for this client, just as we’ve done before for various other applications. However, this time around we are also going to make this project depend on the LogService project. This is important because LogClient has to find the AIDL files we created as part of LogService in order to know what that remote interface looks like. To do this in Eclipse:

  1. After you have created your LogClient project, right-click on your project in Package Explorer and choose Properties.

  2. In the “Properties for LogClient” dialog box, choose Java Build Path, and then click on the Projects tab.

  3. In this tab, click on “Add…”, and point to your LogService project.

This procedure will add LogService as a dependent project for LogClient.

Binding to the Remote Service

Our client is going to be an activity so that we can see it working graphically. In this activity, we’re going to bind to the remote service, and from that point on, use it as if it were just like any other local class. Behind the scenes, the Android binder will marshal and unmarshal the calls to the service.

The binding process is asynchronous, meaning ...

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