You are previewing Lean UX.

Lean UX

Cover of Lean UX by Jeff Gothelf... Published by O'Reilly Media, Inc.
  1. Dedication
  2. Special Upgrade Offer
  3. Praise for <span xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" xmlns:epub="http://www.idpf.org/2007/ops" xmlns:m="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:pls="http://www.w3.org/2005/01/pronunciation-lexicon" xmlns:ssml="http://www.w3.org/2001/10/synthesis" xmlns:svg="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg" class="emphasis"><em>Lean UX</em></span>
  4. Foreword
  5. Preface
    1. What Is Lean UX and How Is It Different?
    2. Who Is Lean UX For?
    3. What’s In It for You?
    4. A Note from Jeff
    5. A Note from Josh
    6. From Jeff and Josh
  6. I. Introduction and Principles
    1. 1. Why Lean UX?
    2. 2. Principles
      1. The Three Foundations of Lean UX
      2. Principles
      3. Wrapping Up: Principles
  7. II. Process
    1. 3. Vision, Framing, and Outcomes
      1. Assumptions
      2. Hypotheses
      3. Outcomes
      4. Personas
      5. Features
      6. Assembling Your Subhypotheses
      7. Conclusion
    2. 4. Collaborative Design
      1. Collaborative Design in Practice
      2. Design Studio
      3. Style Guides
      4. Case Study
      5. Collaborating with Geographically Distributed Teams
      6. Wrapping Up: Collaborative Design
    3. 5. MVPs and Experiments
      1. About MVPs and Experiments
      2. The Focus of an MVP
      3. Creating an MVP
      4. What Should Go Into My Prototype?
      5. Putting It All Together: Using a Prototype MVP
      6. Types of Non-Prototype MVPs
      7. Hybrids and Creativity
      8. Conclusion
    4. 6. Feedback and Research
      1. Continuous and Collaborative
      2. Case Study: Three Users Every Thursday at Meetup
      3. Monitoring Techniques for Continuous, Collaborative Discovery
      4. Conclusion
  8. III. Making It Work
    1. 7. Integrating Lean UX and Agile
      1. Some Definitions
      2. Beyond Staggered Sprints
      3. Building Lean UX into the Rhythm of Scrum
      4. Participation
      5. Design Is a Team Sport: Knowsy Case Study
      6. Beyond the Scrum Team
      7. Conclusion
    2. 8. Making Organizational Shifts
      1. SHIFT: Outcomes
      2. SHIFT: Roles
      3. SHIFT: New Skills for UX Designers
      4. SHIFT: Cross-Functional Teams
      5. SHIFT: Small Teams
      6. SHIFT: Workspace
      7. SHIFT: No More Heroes
      8. No More BDUF, Baby
      9. SHIFT: Speed First, Aesthetics Second
      10. SHIFT: Value Problem Solving
      11. Shift: UX Debt
      12. SHIFT: Agencies Are in the Deliverables Business
      13. SHIFT: Working with Third-Party Vendors
      14. SHIFT: Documentation Standards
      15. SHIFT: Be Realistic about Your Environment
      16. SHIFT: Managing Up and Out
      17. A Last Word
      18. Conclusion
  9. A.  
  10. Index
  11. About the Author
  12. Special Upgrade Offer
  13. Copyright
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Chapter 6. Feedback and Research

Research is formalized curiosity. It is poking and prying with a purpose.

Zora Neale Hurston

It’s now time to put our MVP to the test. All of our work up to this point has been based on assumptions; now we must begin the validation process. We use lightweight, continuous, and collaborative research techniques to do this.

Research with users is at the heart of most approaches to UX. Too often, teams outsource research work to specialized research teams. And too often, research activities take place only on rare occasions—either at the beginning of a project or at the end. Lean UX solves the problems these tactics create by making research both continuous and collaborative. Let’s dig in to see how to do that.

In this chapter, we cover:

  • Collaborative research techniques that allow you to build shared understanding with your team

  • Continuous research techniques that allow you to build small, informal qualitative research studies into every iteration

  • Which artifacts to test and what results you can expect from each of these tests

  • How to incorporate the voice of the customer throughout the Lean UX cycle

  • How to use A/B testing (described later in this chapter) in your research

  • How to reconcile contradictory feedback from multiple sources

Continuous and Collaborative

Lean UX takes basic UX research techniques and overlays two important ideas. First, Lean UX research is continuous; this means that you build research activities into every sprint. Instead of a costly and ...

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