You are previewing Lean UX.

Lean UX

Cover of Lean UX by Jeff Gothelf... Published by O'Reilly Media, Inc.
  1. Dedication
  2. Special Upgrade Offer
  3. Praise for <span xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" xmlns:epub="http://www.idpf.org/2007/ops" xmlns:m="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:pls="http://www.w3.org/2005/01/pronunciation-lexicon" xmlns:ssml="http://www.w3.org/2001/10/synthesis" xmlns:svg="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg" class="emphasis"><em>Lean UX</em></span>
  4. Foreword
  5. Preface
    1. What Is Lean UX and How Is It Different?
    2. Who Is Lean UX For?
    3. What’s In It for You?
    4. A Note from Jeff
    5. A Note from Josh
    6. From Jeff and Josh
  6. I. Introduction and Principles
    1. 1. Why Lean UX?
    2. 2. Principles
      1. The Three Foundations of Lean UX
      2. Principles
      3. Wrapping Up: Principles
  7. II. Process
    1. 3. Vision, Framing, and Outcomes
      1. Assumptions
      2. Hypotheses
      3. Outcomes
      4. Personas
      5. Features
      6. Assembling Your Subhypotheses
      7. Conclusion
    2. 4. Collaborative Design
      1. Collaborative Design in Practice
      2. Design Studio
      3. Style Guides
      4. Case Study
      5. Collaborating with Geographically Distributed Teams
      6. Wrapping Up: Collaborative Design
    3. 5. MVPs and Experiments
      1. About MVPs and Experiments
      2. The Focus of an MVP
      3. Creating an MVP
      4. What Should Go Into My Prototype?
      5. Putting It All Together: Using a Prototype MVP
      6. Types of Non-Prototype MVPs
      7. Hybrids and Creativity
      8. Conclusion
    4. 6. Feedback and Research
      1. Continuous and Collaborative
      2. Case Study: Three Users Every Thursday at Meetup
      3. Monitoring Techniques for Continuous, Collaborative Discovery
      4. Conclusion
  8. III. Making It Work
    1. 7. Integrating Lean UX and Agile
      1. Some Definitions
      2. Beyond Staggered Sprints
      3. Building Lean UX into the Rhythm of Scrum
      4. Participation
      5. Design Is a Team Sport: Knowsy Case Study
      6. Beyond the Scrum Team
      7. Conclusion
    2. 8. Making Organizational Shifts
      1. SHIFT: Outcomes
      2. SHIFT: Roles
      3. SHIFT: New Skills for UX Designers
      4. SHIFT: Cross-Functional Teams
      5. SHIFT: Small Teams
      6. SHIFT: Workspace
      7. SHIFT: No More Heroes
      8. No More BDUF, Baby
      9. SHIFT: Speed First, Aesthetics Second
      10. SHIFT: Value Problem Solving
      11. Shift: UX Debt
      12. SHIFT: Agencies Are in the Deliverables Business
      13. SHIFT: Working with Third-Party Vendors
      14. SHIFT: Documentation Standards
      15. SHIFT: Be Realistic about Your Environment
      16. SHIFT: Managing Up and Out
      17. A Last Word
      18. Conclusion
  9. A.  
  10. Index
  11. About the Author
  12. Special Upgrade Offer
  13. Copyright
O'Reilly logo

Chapter 3. Vision, Framing, and Outcomes

If it disagrees with experiment, it’s wrong.

Dr. Richard Feynman

Traditionally, UX design projects are framed by requirements and deliverables; teams are given requirements and expected to produce deliverables. Lean UX radically shifts the way we frame our work. Our goal is not to create a deliverable, it’s to change something in the world—to create an outcome. We start with assumptions instead of requirements. We create and test hypotheses. We measure to see whether we’ve achieved our desired outcomes.

This chapter covers the main tool of outcome-focused work: the hypothesis statement. The hypothesis statement is the starting point for a project. It states a clear vision for the work and shifts the conversation between team members and their managers from outputs (e.g., “we will create a single sign-on feature”) to outcomes (e.g., “we want to increase the number of new sign-ups to our service”).

The hypothesis statement is a way of expressing assumptions in testable form. It is composed of the following elements:

Assumptions

A high-level declaration of what we believe to be true.

Hypotheses

More granular descriptions of our assumptions that target specific areas of our product or workflow for experimentation.

Outcomes

The signal we seek from the market to help us validate or invalidate our hypotheses. These are often quantitative but can also be qualitative.

Personas

Models of the people for whom we believe we are solving a problem.

Features

The product ...

The best content for your career. Discover unlimited learning on demand for around $1/day.