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Knowledge Visualization and Visual Literacy in Science Education

Book Description

Effective communication within learning environments is a pivotal aspect to students’ success. By enhancing abstract concepts with visual media, students can achieve a higher level of retention and better understand the presented information. Knowledge Visualization and Visual Literacy in Science Education is an authoritative reference source for the latest scholarly research on the implementation of visual images, aids, and graphics in classroom settings and focuses on how these methods stimulate critical thinking in students. Highlighting concepts relating to cognition, communication, and computing, this book is ideally designed for researchers, instructors, academicians, and students.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. Title Page
  3. Copyright Page
  4. Book Series
    1. Mission
    2. Coverage
  5. Editorial Advisory Board
  6. Foreword
  7. Preface
    1. CHALLENGES AND POSSIBLE SOLUTIONS
    2. ORGANIZATION OF THE BOOK
    3. REFERENCES
  8. Acknowledgment
  9. Section 1: Cognition and Visual Literacy
    1. Chapter 1: Teaching and Learning Science as a Visual Experience
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. THE FRAMEWORK
      4. WAYS OF COMMUNICATING KNOWLEDGE
      5. KNOWLEDGE VISUALIZATION CONCEPTS AND METHODS
      6. CONCERNS ABOUT SCIENCE EDUCATION
      7. CONCLUSION AND DISCUSSION
      8. REFERENCES
      9. ADDITIONAL READING
      10. KEY TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
    2. Chapter 2: Exploring Perception, Cognition, and Neural Pathways of Stereo Vision and the Split–Brain Human Computer Interface
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. BACKGROUND
      4. SOLUTIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS
      5. FUTURE RESEARCH DIRECTIONS
      6. CONCLUSION
      7. REFERENCES
      8. ADDITIONAL READING
      9. KEY TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
      10. APPENDIX
    3. Chapter 3: Better Visualization through Better Vision
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION: CHANGING HOW WE SEE
      3. A MAP OF THE TERRITORY
      4. FUTURE RESEARCH DIRECTIONS
      5. REFERENCES
      6. ADDITIONAL READING
      7. KEY TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
    4. Chapter 4: Science and Art
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. THE CONCEPT OF A FOURTH DIMENSION
      4. THE MATHEMATICAL ORDER
      5. CONCLUSION
      6. REFERENCES
      7. ADDITIONAL READING
      8. KEY TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
  10. Section 2: Visual Communication and Knowledge Visualization
    1. Chapter 5: Visualization in Biology
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. COLLECTING SEAWEED OR ALGAE
      4. AQUATIC ORGANISMS
      5. DRAWING AS KNOWING
      6. LEARNING ABOUT ALGAE
      7. ONLINE RESOURCES
      8. CITIZEN SCIENCE
      9. ART AND ALGAE
      10. CONCLUSION
      11. FURTHER RESEARCH DIRECTIONS
      12. REFERENCES
      13. ADDITIONAL READING
      14. KEY TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
    2. Chapter 6: Visualisation and Communication in Mathematics
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. MISSING POINTS
      4. SANGAKU
      5. ANAMORPHIC VIEWS
      6. INFINITE DESCENT
      7. ANALYSIS
      8. ALGORITHMIC
      9. STUDIES OF DYNAMICAL SYSTEM
      10. MATHS LEADING TO ART
      11. CONCLUSION
      12. REFERENCES
      13. ADDITIONAL READING
      14. KEY TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
    3. Chapter 7: Collage Strategy
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. BACKGROUND
      4. 1. THEORY
      5. 2. PRACTICE
      6. CONCLUSION
      7. REFERENCES
      8. ADDITIONAL READING
      9. KEY TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
    4. Chapter 8: How We Hear and Experience Music
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. BACKGROUND
      4. VIRTUAL MUSIC
      5. AN EXPERIMENT ON THE NATURE OF PITCH: PSYCHOACOUSTICS OF RESULTANT TONES
      6. PRENATAL ORIGINS OF MUSICAL EMOTION: THE CASE FOR FETAL IMPRINTING
      7. A BOOTSTRAP THEORY OF SENSORY PERCEPTION
      8. CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATION
      9. REFERENCES
      10. ADDITIONAL READING
      11. KEY TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
  11. Section 3: Computing and Programming
    1. Chapter 9: Using Video Tutorials to Learn Maya 3D for Creative Outcomes
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. INTRODUCTION OF VIDEO TUTORIALS: CASE STUDIES
      4. RESULTS FROM CASE STUDIES
      5. DISCUSSION OF RESULTS
      6. CONCLUSION
      7. FUTURE DIRECTIONS
      8. REFERENCES
      9. KEY TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
    2. Chapter 10: Metaphors for Dance and Programming
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: MUSIC, WORDS, AND PROGRAMS
      4. RULES AND RESTRICTIONS IN PROGRAMMING THROUGH A METAPHOR OF DANCE STEPS
      5. PROGRAMS, EXAMPLES, AND VISUAL SOLUTIONS
      6. RECOMMENDATIONS FOR FURTHER WORK
      7. SUMMARY AND CONCLUSION
      8. REFERENCES
      9. ADDITIONAL READING
      10. KEY TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
  12. Section 4: Educational Applications and Cognitive Learning
    1. Chapter 11: Optimizing Students' Information Processing in Science Learning
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. THEORETICAL BACKGROUND
      4. OPTIMIZE VISUAL LEARNING IN SCIENCE
      5. A FRAMEWORK FOR OPTIMIZING EFFECTIVE VISUALS IN SCIENCE LEARNING
      6. FUTURE RESEARCH
      7. DISCUSSION
      8. CONCLUSION
      9. REFERENCES
      10. KEY TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
    2. Chapter 12: Integrative Visual Projects for Cognitive Learning
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. 1. THE TAIL STORY
      4. 2. THE EGG STORY
      5. EGG CULTURE
      6. 3. THE BEACH
      7. 4. NANOTECHNOLOGY AND BIOIMAGING
      8. CONCLUSION
      9. REFERENCES
      10. ADDITIONAL READING
      11. KEY TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
    3. Chapter 13: The Difference between Evaluating and Understanding Students' Visual Representations of Scientists and Engineers
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. EVALUATING VISUAL DATA FROM STUDENTS ABOUT SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS
      4. PERCEPTIONS TO CONCEPTIONS
      5. MOVING BEYOND EVALUATION TO UNDERSTANDING
      6. MULTIPLE REPRESENTATIONS OF SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS
      7. SCORING VISUAL DATA IN ENGINEERING ILLUSTRATIONS
      8. COMPARING STEREOTYPICAL ILLUSTRATIONS OF SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS
      9. SOLUTIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS
      10. FUTURE RESEARCH DIRECTIONS
      11. CONCLUSION
      12. REFERENCES
      13. KEY TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
  13. Compilation of References
  14. About the Contributors