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Joomla!® 24-Hour Trainer by Jen Kramer

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CHOOSING A GOOD DOMAIN NAME

There are many aspects to choosing a good domain name that works for your organization. Here are some things to consider.

Top-Level Domain

The top-level domain (TLD) refers to the domain name ending. Common endings include .com, .net, .org, .biz, and .info. There are specific endings for organizations, such as .edu for educational institutions and .gov for the United States government. Some endings refer to a country. In the United States, this is .us, but you may have also encountered .uk (United Kingdom), .de (Germany), and many others. For a full list of TLDs, see the Wikipedia article at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Internet_top-level_domains.

Historically, your organization would be limited to one of the TLDs. For example, if you were running a nonprofit, you would register a .org name. Internet service providers would register a .net name, while businesses would register a .com name.

These days, some TLDs are still restricted. You cannot register an .edu domain, for example, unless you are an accredited post-secondary educational institution in the United States. However, many TLDs are not restricted, including .com, .net, .org, .biz, and .info. Generally, you will find that nonprofits and other not-for-profit entities (like K-12 school districts) still register .org addresses, while businesses still prefer .com addresses; however, they are not restricted to those TLDs.

You may wish to register more than one address to prevent name confusion. ...

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