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Jenkins: The Definitive Guide by John Ferguson Smart

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Master/Slave Strategies in Jenkins

There are a number of different ways that you can configure set up a distributed build farm using Jenkins, depending on your operating systems and network architecture. In all cases, the fact that a build job is being run on a slave, and how that slave is managed, is transparent for the end-user: the build results and artifacts will always end up on the master server.

Creating a new Jenkins slave node is a straightforward process. First, go to the Manage Jenkins screen and click on Manage Nodes. This screen displays the list of slave agents (also known as “Nodes” in more politically correct terms), shown in Figure 11-1. From here, you can set up new nodes by clicking on the New Node button. You can also configure some of the parameters related to your distributed build setup (see Node Monitoring).

Managing slave nodes

Figure 11-1. Managing slave nodes

There are several different strategies when it comes to managing Jenkins slave nodes, depending on your target operating systems and other architectural considerations. These strategies affect the way you configure your slave nodes, so we need to consider them separately. In the following sections, we will look at the most frequently used ways to install and configure Jenkins slaves:

  • The master starts the slave agents via ssh

  • Starting the slave agent manually using Java Web Start

  • Installing the slave agent as a Window service ...

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