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Auditing—Keeping Track of User Actions

In addition to configuring user accounts and access rights, it can also be useful to keep track of the individual user actions: in other words, who did what to your server configuration. This sort of audit trail facility is even required in many organizations.

There are two Jenkins plugins that can help you do this. The Audit Trail plugin keeps a record of user changes in a special log file. And the JobConfigHistory plugin lets you keep a copy of previous versions of the various system and job configuration files that Jenkins uses.

The Audit Trail Plugin keeps track of the main user actions in a set of rolling log files. To set this up, go to the Plugin Manager page and select the Audit Trail plugin in the list of available plugins. Then, as usual, click on Install and restart Jenkins once the plugin has been downloaded.

You can set up the audit trail configuration in the Audit Trail section of the main Jenkins configuration page (see Figure 7-28). The most important field is the Log Location, which is where you indicate the directory in which the log files are to be written. The audit trail is designed to produce system-style log files, which are often placed in a special system directory such as /var/log. You can also configure the number of log files to be maintained, and the (approximate) maximum size of each file. The simplest option is to provide an absolute path (such as /var/log/hudson.log), in which case Jenkins will write to log files ...

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